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EUVL Materials Readiness for HVM

Friday, June 2nd, 2017

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technology Editor

Extreme-Ultra-Violet Lithography (EUVL)—based on ~13.5nm wavelength EM waves bouncing off mirrors in a vacuum—will finally be used in commercial IC fabrication by Intel, Samsung, and TSMC starting in 2018. In a recent quarterly earning calls ASML reported a backlog of orders for 21 EUVL tools. At the 2017 SPIE Advanced Lithography conference, presentations detailed how the source and mask and resist all are near targets for next year, while the mask pellicle still needs work. Actinic metrology for mask inspection still remains a known expensive issue to solve.

Figure 1 shows minimal pitch line/space grids and contact-hole arrays patterned with EUVL at global R&D hub IMEC in Belgium, as presented at the recent 2017 IMEC Technology Forum. While there is no way with photolithography to escape the trade-offs of the Resolution/Line-Width-Roughness/Sensitivity (RLS) triangle, patterning at the leading edge of possible pitches requires application-specific etch integration. The bottom row of SEMs in this figure all show dramatic improvements in LWR through atomic-scale etch and deposition treatments to patterned sidewalls.

Fig.1: SEM plan-view images of minimum pitch Resolution and Line-Width-Roughness and Sensitivity (RLS) for both Chemically-Amplified Resist (CAR) and Non-Chemically-Amplified Resist (NCAR, meaning metal-oxide solution from Inpria) formulations, showing that excessive LWR can be smoothed by various post-lithography deposition/etch treatments. (Source: IMEC)

ASML has recently claimed that as an indication of continued maturity, ASML’s NXE:33×0 steppers have now collectively surpassed one million processed wafers to date, and only correctly exposed wafers were included in the count. During the company’s 1Q17 earnings call, it was reported that three additional orders for NXE:3400B steppers were received in Q1 adding  to a total of 21 in backlog, worth nearly US$2.5B.

At $117M each NXE:3400B, assuming 10 years useful life it costs $32,000 each day and assuming 18 productive hours/day and 80 wafers/hour then it costs $22 per wafer-pass just for tool depreciation. In comparison, a $40M argon-fluoride immersion (ArFi) stepper over ten years with 21 available hours/day and 240 wafers/hour costs $2.2 per wafer-pass for depreciation. EUVL will always be an expensive high-value-add technology, even though a single EUVL exposure can replace 4-5 ArFi exposures.

Fabs that delay use of EUVL at the leading edge of device scaling will instead have to buy and facilitize many more ArFi tools, demanding more fab space and more optical lithography gases. SemiMD spoke with Paul Stockman, Linde Electronics’ Head of Market Development, about the global supply of specialty neon and xenon gas blends:  “Xenon is only a ppm level component of the neon-blend for Kr and Ar lasers, so there should be no concerns with Xenon supply for the industry. In our modeling we’ve realized the impact of multi-patterning on gas demand, and we’ve assumed that the industry would need multi-patterning in our forecasts.” said Stockman.

“From the Linde perspective, we manage supply carefully to meet anticipated customer demand,” reminded Stockman. “We recently added 40 million liters of neon capacity in the US, and continue to add significant supply with partners so that we can serve our customers regardless of the EUV scenario.” (Editor’s note: reported by SemiMD here.)

At SPIE Advanced Lithography 2017, SemiMD discussed multi-patterning process flows with Uday Mitra and Regina Freed of Applied Materials. “We need a lot of materials engineering now,” explained Freed. “We need new gap-fills and hard-masks, and we may need new materials for selective deposition. Regarding the etch, we need extreme selectivity with no damage, and ability to get into the smallest features to take out just one atomic layer at a time.”

Reminding us that IC fabs must be risk-averse when considering technology options, Mitra (formerly with Intel) commented, “You don’t do a technology change and a wafer size change at the same time. That’s how you risk manage, and you can imagine with something like EUVL that customers will first use it for limited patterning and check it out.”

Figure 2 lists the major issues in pattern-transfer using plasma etch tools, along with the process variables that must be controlled to ensure proper pattern fidelity. Applied Materials’ Sym3 etch chamber features hardware that provides pulsed energy at dual frequencies along with low residence time of reactant byproducts to allow for precise tuning of process parameters no matter what chemistry is needed.

Fig.2: Patterning issues and associated etch process variables which can be used for control thereof. (Source: Applied Materials)

Andrew Grenville, CEO of resist supplier Inpria, in an exclusive interview with SemiMD, commented on the infrastructure readiness for EUVL volume production. “We are building up our pilot line facility in Corvallis, Oregon. The timing for that is next year, and we are putting in place plans to continue to scale up the new materials at the same times as the quality control systems such as functional QC.” The end-users ask for quality control checks of more parameters, putting a burden on suppliers to invest in more metrology tools and even develop new measurement techniques. Inpria’s resist is based on SnOx nanoparticles, which provide for excellent etch resistance even with layers as thin as 20nm, but required the development of a new technique to measure ppb levels of trace metals in the presence of high tin signals.

“We believe that there is continued opportunity for improvement in the overall patterning performance based on the ancillaries, particularly in simplifying the under-layers. One of the core principles of our material is that we’re putting the ‘resist’ back in the resist,” enthused Grenville. “We can show the etch contrast of our material can really improve the Line-Width Roughness of the patterns because of what you can do in etch, and it’s not merely smoothing the resist. We can substantially improve the outcome by engineering the stack and the etch recipe using completely different chemistry than could be used with chemically-amplified resist.”

The 2017 EUVL Workshop (2017 International Workshop on EUV Lithography) will be held June 12-15 at The Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, CA. This workshop, now in its tenth year, is focused on the fundamental science of EUV Lithography (EUVL). Travel and hotel information as well as on-line registration is available at https://euvlitho.com/.

[DISCLOSURE:  Ed Korczynski is also Sr. Analyst for TECHCET responsible for the Critical Materials Report (CMR) on Photoresists, Extensions & Ancillaries.]

—E.K.

Mechanistic Modeling of Silicon ALE for FinFETs

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

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With billions of device features on the most advanced silicon CMOS ICs, the industry needs to be able to precisely etch atomic-scale features without over-etching. Atomic layer etching (ALE), can ideally remove uniform layers of material with consistent thickness in each cycle, and can improve uniformity, reduce damage, increase selectivity, and minimize aspect ratio dependent etching (ARDE) rates. Researchers Chad Huard et al. from the University of Michigan and Lam Research recently published “Atomic layer etching of 3D structures in silicon: Self-limiting and nonideal reactions” in the latest issue of the Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology A (http://dx.doi.org/10.1116/1.4979661). Proper control of sub-cycle pulse times is the key to preventing gas mixing that can degrade the fidelity of ALE.

The authors modeled non-idealities in the ALE of silicon using Ar/Cl2 plasmas:  passivation using Ar/Cl2 plasma resulting in a single layer of SiClx, followed by Ar-ion bombardment to remove the single passivated layer. Un-surprisingly, they found that ideal ALE requires self-limited processes during both steps. Decoupling passivation and etching allows for several advantages over continuous etching, including more ideal etch profiles, high selectivity, and low plasma-induced damage. Any continuous etching —when either or both process steps are not fully self-limited— can cause ARDE and surface roughness.

The gate etch in a finFET process requires that 3D corners be accurately resolved to maintain a uniform gate length along the height of the fin. In so doing, the roughness of the etch surface and the exact etch depth per cycle (EPC) are not as critical as the ability of ALE to be resistant to ARDE. The Figure shows that the geometry modeled was a periodic array of vertical crystalline silicon fins, each 10nm wide and 42nm high, set at a pitch of 42 nm. For continuous etching (a-c), simulations used a 70/30 mix of Ar/Cl gas and RF bias of 30V. Just before the etch-front touches the underlying SiO2 (a), the profile has tapered away from the trench sidewalls and the etch-front shows some micro-trenching produced by ions (or hot neutrals) specularly reflected from the tapered sidewalls. After a 25% over-etch (b), a significant amount of Si remains in the corners and on the sides of the fins. Even after an over-etch of 100% (c), Si still remains in the corners.

FIGURE CAPTION: Simulated profiles resulting from etching finFET gates with (a)–(c) a continuous etching process, or (d)–(f) an optimized ALE process. Time increases from left to right, and images represent equal over-etch (as a percentage of the time required to expose the bottom SiO2) not equal etch times. Times listed for the ALE process in (d)–(f) represent plasma-on, ignoring any purge or dwell times. (Source: J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A, Vol. 35, No. 3, May/Jun 2017)

In comparison, the ALE process (d-f) shows that after 25% over-etch (e) the bottom SiO2 surface would be almost completely cleared with minimal corner residues, and continuing to 100% over-etch results in little change to the profile. The ALE process times shown here do not include the gas purge and fill times between plasma pulses; to clear the feature using ALE required 200 pulses and assuming 5 seconds of purge time between each pulse results in a total process time of 15–20 min to clear the feature. This is a significant increase in total process time over the continuous etch (2 min).

One conclusion of this ALE modeling is that even small deviations from perfectly self-limited reactions significantly compromise the ideality of the ALE process. For example, having as little as 10 ppm Cl2 residual gas in the chamber during the ion bombardment phase produced non-idealities in the ALE. Introducing any source of continuous chemical etching into the ALE process leads to the onset of ARDE and roughening of the etch front. These trends have significant implications for both the design of specialized ALE chambers, and also for the use of ALE to control uniformity.

—E.K.

Lithographic Stochastic Limits on Resolution

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

The physical and economic limits of Moore’s Law are being approached as the commercial IC fab industry continues reducing device features to the atomic-scale. Early signs of such limits are seen when attempting to pattern the smallest possible features using lithography. Stochastic variation in the composition of the photoresist as well as in the number of incident photons combine to destroy determinism for the smallest devices in R&D. The most advanced Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) exposure tools from ASML cannot avoid this problem without reducing throughputs, and thereby increasing the cost of manufacturing.

Since the beginning of IC manufacturing over 50 years ago, chip production has been based on deterministic control of fabrication (fab) processes. Variations within process parameters could be controlled with statistics to ensure that all transistors on a chip performed nearly identically. Design rules could be set based on assumed in-fab distributions of CD and misalignment between layers to determine the final performance of transistors.

As the IC fab industry has evolved from micron-scale to nanometer-scale device production, the control of lithographic patterning has evolved to be able to bend-light at 193nm wavelength using Off-Axis Illumination (OAI) of Optical-Proximity Correction (OPC) mask features as part of Reticle Enhancement Technology (RET) to be able to print <40nm half-pitch (HP) line arrays with good definition. The most advanced masks and 193nm-immersion (193i) steppers today are able to focus more photons into each cubic-nanometer of photoresist to improve the contrast between exposed and non-exposed regions in the areal image. To avoid escalating cost and complexity of multi-patterning with 193i, the industry needs Extreme Ultra-Violet Lithography (EUVL) technology.

Figure 1 shows Dr. Britt Turkot, who has been leading Intel’s integration of EUVL since 1996, reassuring a standing-room-only crowd during a 2017 SPIE Advanced Lithography (http://spie.org/conferences-and-exhibitions/advanced-lithography) keynote address that the availability for manufacturing of EUVL steppers has been steadily improving. The new tools are close to 80% available for manufacturing, but they may need to process fewer wafers per hour to ensure high yielding final chips.

Figure 1. Britt Turkot (Intel Corp.) gave a keynote presentation on "EUVL Readiness for High-Volume Manufacturing” during the 2017 SPIE Advanced Lithography conference. (Source: SPIE)

The KLA-Tencor Lithography Users Forum was held in San Jose on February 26 before the start of SPIE-AL; there, Turcot also provided a keynote address that mentioned the inherent stochastic issues associated with patterning 7nm-node device features. We must ensure zero defects within the 10 billion contacts needed in the most advanced ICs. Given 10 billion contacts it is statistically certain that some will be subject to 7-sigma fluctuations, and this leads to problems in controlling the limited number of EUV photons reaching the target area of a resist feature. The volume of resist material available to absorb EUV in a given area is reduced by the need to avoid pattern-collapse when aspect-ratios increase over 2:1; so 15nm half-pitch lines will generally be limited to just 30nm thick resist. “The current state of materials will not gate EUV,” said Turkot, “but we need better stochastics and control of shot-noise so that photoresist will not be a long-term limiter.”

TABLE:  EUVL stochastics due to scaled contact hole size. (Source: Intel Corp.)

CONTACT HOLE DIAMETER 24nm 16nm
INCIDENT EUV PHOTONS 4610 2050
# ABSORBED IN AREAL IMAGE 700 215

From the LithoGuru blog of gentleman scientist Chris Mack (http://www.lithoguru.com/scientist/essays/Tennants_Law.html):

One reason why smaller pixels are harder to control is the stochastic effects of exposure:  as you decrease the number of electrons (or photons) per pixel, the statistical uncertainty in the number of electrons or photons actually used goes up. The uncertainty produces line-width errors, most readily observed as line-width roughness (LWR). To combat the growing uncertainty in smaller pixels, a higher dose is required.

We define a “stochastic” or random process as a collection of random variables (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stochastic_process), and a Wiener process (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiener_process) as a continuous-time stochastic process in honor of Norbert Wiener. Brownian motion and the thermally-driven diffusion of molecules exhibit such “random-walk” behavior. Stochastic phenomena in lithography include the following:

  • Photon count,
  • Photo-acid generator positions,
  • Photon absorption,
  • Photo-acid generation,
  • Polymer position and chain length,
  • Diffusion during post-exposure bake,
  • Dissolution/neutralization, and
  • Etching hard-mask.

Figure 2 shows the stochastics within EUVL start with direct photolysis and include ionization and scattering within a given discrete photoresist volume, as reported by Solid State Technology in 2010.

Figure 2. Discrete acid generation in an EUV resist is based on photolysis as well as ionization and electron scattering; stochastic variations of each must be considered in minimally scaled areal images. (Source: Solid State Technology)

Resist R&D

During SPIE-AL this year, ASML provided an overview of the state of the craft in EUV resist R&D. There has been steady resolution improvement over 10 years with Photo-sensitive Chemically-Amplified Resists (PCAR) from 45nm to 13nm HP; however, 13nm HP needed 58 mJ/cm2, and provided DoF of 99nm with 4.4nm LWR. The recent non-PCAR Metal-Oxide Resist (MOR) from Inpria has been shown to resolve 12nm HP with  4.7 LWR using 38 mJ/cm2, and increasing exposure to 70 mJ/cm2 has produced 10nm HP L/S patterns.

In the EUVL tool with variable pupil control, reducing the pupil fill increases the contrast such that 20nm diameter contact holes with 3nm Local Critical-Dimension Uniformity (LCDU) can be done. The challenge is to get LCDU to <2nm to meet the specification for future chips. ASML’s announced next-generation N.A. >0.5 EUVL stepper will use anamorphic mirrors and masks which will double the illumination intensity per cm2 compared to today’s 0.33 N.A. tools. This will inherently improve the stochastics, when eventually ready after 2020.

The newest generation EUVL steppers use a membrane between the wafer and the optics so that any resist out-gassing cannot contaminate the mirrors, and this allow a much wider range of materials to be used as resists. Regarding MOR, there are 3.5 times more absorbed photons and 8 times more electrons generated per photon compared to PCAR. Metal hard-masks (HM) and other under-layers create reflections that have a significant effect on the LWR, requiring tuning of the materials in resist stacks.

Default R&D hub of the world imec has been testing EUV resists from five different suppliers, targeting 20 mJ/cm2 sensitivity with 30nm thickness for PCAR and 18nm thickness for MOR. All suppliers were able to deliver the requested resolution of 16nm HP line/space (L/S) patterns, yet all resists showed LWR >5nm. In another experiment, the dose to size for imec’s “7nm-node” metal-2 (M2) vias with nominal pitch of 53nm was ~60mJ/cm2. All else equal, three times slower lithography costs three times as much per wafer pass.

—E.K.

Deep Learning Could Boost Yields, Increase Revenues

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

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By Dave Lammers, Contributing Editor

While it is still early days for deep-learning techniques, the semiconductor industry may benefit from the advances in neural networks, according to analysts and industry executives.

First, the design and manufacturing of advanced ICs can become more efficient by deploying neural networks trained to analyze data, though labelling and classifying that data remains a major challenge. Also, demand will be spurred by the inference engines used in smartphones, autos, drones, robots and other systems, while the processors needed to train neural networks will re-energize demand for high-performance systems.

Abel Brown, senior systems architect at Nvidia, said until the 2010-2012 time frame, neural networks “didn’t have enough data.” Then, a “big bang” occurred when computing power multiplied and very large labelled data sets grew at Amazon, Google, and elsewhere. The trifecta was complete with advances in neural network techniques for image, video, and real-time voice recognition, among others.

During the training process, Brown noted, neural networks “figure out the important parts of the data” and then “converge to a set of significant features and parameters.”

Chris Rowen, who recently started Cognite Ventures to advise deep-learning startups, said he is “becoming aware of a lot more interest from the EDA industry” in deep learning techniques, adding that “problems in manufacturing also are very suitable” to the approach.

Chris Rowen, Cognite Ventures

For the semiconductor industry, Rowen said, deep-learning techniques are akin to “a shiny new hammer” that companies are still trying to figure out how to put to good use. But since yield questions are so important, and the causes of defects are often so hard to pinpoint, deep learning is an attractive approach to semiconductor companies.

“When you have masses of data, and you know what the outcome is but have no clear idea of what the causality is, (deep learning) can bring a complex model of causality that is very hard to do with manual methods,” said Rowen, an IEEE fellow who earlier was the CEO of Tensilica Inc.

The magic of deep learning, Rowen said, is that the learning process is highly automated and “doesn’t require a fab expert to look at the particular defect patterns.”

“It really is a rather brute force, naïve method. You don’t really know what the constituent patterns are that lead to these particular failures. But if you have enough examples that relate inputs to outputs, to defects or to failures, then you can use deep learning.”

Juan Rey, senior director of engineering at Mentor Graphics, said Mentor engineers have started investigating deep-learning techniques which could improve models of the lithography process steps, a complex issue that Rey said “is an area where deep neural networks and machine learning seem to be able to help.”

Juan Rey, Mentor Graphics

In the lithography process “we need to create an approximate model of what needs to be analyzed. For example, for photolithography specifically, there is the transition between dark and clear areas, where the slope of intensity for that transition zone plays a very clear role in the physics of the problem being solved. The problem tends to be that the design, the exact formulation, cannot be used in every space, and we are limited by the computational resources. We need to rely on a few discrete measurements, perhaps a few tens of thousands, maybe more, but it still is a discrete data set, and we don’t know if that is enough to cover all the cases when we model the full chip,” he said.

“Where we see an opportunity for deep learning is to try to do an interpretation for that problem, given that an exhaustive analysis is impossible. Using these new types of algorithms, we may be able to move from a problem that is continuous to a problem with a discrete data set.”

Mentor seeks to cooperate with academia and with research consortia such as IMEC. “We want to find the right research projects to sponsor between our research teams and academic teams. We hope that we can get better results with these new types of algorithms, and in the longer term with the new hardware that is being developed,” Rey said.

Many companies are developing specialized processors to run machine-learning algorithms, including non-Von Neumann, asynchronous architectures, which could offer several orders of magnitude less power consumption. “We are paying a lot of attention to the research, and would like to use some of these chips to solve some of the problems that the industry has, problems that are not very well served right now,” Rey said.

While power savings can still be gained with synchronous architectures, Rey said brain-inspired projects such as Qualcomm’s Zeroth processor, or the use of memristors being developed at H-P Labs, may be able to deliver significant power savings. “These are all worth paying attention to. It is my feeling that different architectures may be needed to deal with unstructured data. Otherwise, total power consumption is going through the roof. For unstructured data, these types of problem can be dealt with much better with neuromorphic computers.”

The use of deep learning techniques is moving beyond the biggest players, such as Google, Amazon, and the like. Just as various system integrators package the open source modules of the Hadoop data base technology into a more-secure offering, several system integrators are offering workstations packaged with the appropriate deep-learning tools.

Deep learning has evolved to play a role in speech recognition used in Amazon’s Echo. Source: Amazon

Robert Stober, director of systems engineering at Bright Computing, bundles AI software and tools with hardware based on Nvidia or Intel processors. “Our mission statement is to deploy deep learning packages, infrastructure, and clusters, so there is no more digging around for weeks and weeks by your expensive data scientists,” Stober said.

Deep learning is driving new the need for new types of processors as well as high-speed interconnects. Tim Miller, senior vice president at One Stop Systems, said that training the neural networks used in deep learning is an ideal task for GPUs because they can perform parallel calculations, sharply reducing the training time. However, GPUs often are large and require cooling, which most systems are not equipped to handle.

David Kanter, principal consultant at Real World Technologies, said “as I look at what’s driving the industry, it’s about convolutional neural networks, and using general-purpose hardware to do this is not the most efficient thing.”

However, research efforts focused on using new materials or futuristic architectures may over-complicate the situation for data scientists outside of the research arena. At the International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM 2017), several research managers discussed using spin torque magnetic (STT-MRAM) technology, or resistive RAMs (ReRAM), to create dense, power-efficient networks of artificial neurons.

While those efforts are worthwhile from a research standpoint, Kanter said “when proving a new technology, you want to minimize the situation, and if you change the software architecture of neural networks, that is asking a lot of programmers, to adopt a different programming method.”

While Nvidia, Intel, and others battle it out at the high end for the processors used in training the neural network, the inference engines which use the results of that training must be less expensive and consume far less power.

Kanter said “today, most inference processing is done on general-purpose CPUs. It does not require a GPU. Most people I know at Google do not use a GPU. Since the (inference processing) workload load looks like the processing of DSP algorithms, it can be done with special-purpose cores from Tensilica (now part of Cadence) or ARC (now part of Synopsys). That is way better than any GPU,” Kanter said.

Rowen was asked if the end-node inference engine will blossom into large volumes. “I would emphatically say, yes, powerful inference engines will be widely deployed” in markets such as imaging, voice processing, language recognition, and modeling.

“There will be some opportunity for stand-alone inference engines, but most IEs will be part of a larger system. Inference doesn’t necessarily need hundreds of square millimeters of silicon. But it will be a major sub-system, widely deployed in a range of SoC platforms,” Rowen said.

Kanter noted that Nvidia has a powerful inference engine processor that has gained traction in the early self-driving cars, and Google has developed an ASIC to process its Tensor deep learning software language.

In many other markets, what is needed are very low power consumption IEs that can be used in security cameras, voice processors, drones, and many other markets. Nvidia CEO Jen Hsung Huang, in a blog post early this year, said that deep learning will spur demand for billions of devices deployed in drones, portable instruments, intelligent cameras, and autonomous vehicles.

“Someday, billions of intelligent devices will take advantage of deep learning to perform seemingly intelligent tasks,” Huang wrote. He envisions a future in which drones will autonomously find an item in a warehouse, for example, while portable medical instruments will use artificial intelligence to diagnose blood samples on-site.

In the long run, that “billions” vision may be correct, Kanter said, adding that the Nvidia CEO, an adept promoter as well as an astute company leader, may be wearing his salesman hat a bit.

“Ten years from now, inference processing will be widespread, and many SoCs will have an inference accelerator on board,” Kanter said.

Edge Placement Error Control in Multi-Patterning

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

SPIE Advanced Lithography remains the technical conference where the leading edge of minimum resolution patterning is explored, even though photolithography is now only part of the story. Leading OEMs continue to impress the industry with more productive ArFi steppers, but the photoresist suppliers and the purveyors of vacuum deposition and etch tools now provide most of the new value-add. Tri-layer-resist (TLR) stacks, specialty hard-masks and anti-reflective coatings (ARC), and complex thin-film depositions and etches all combine to create application-specific lithography solutions tuned to each critical mask.

Multi-patterning using complementary lithography—using argon-fluoride immersion (ArFi) steppers to pattern 1D line arrays plus extreme ultra-violet (EUV) tools to do line cuts—is under development at all leading edge fabs today. Figure 1 shows that edge placement error (EPE) in lines, cut layers, and vias/contacts between two orthogonal patterned layers can result in shorts and opens. Consequently, EPE control is critical for yield within any multi-patterning process flow, including litho-etch-litho-etch (LELE), self-aligned double-patterning (SADP) and self-aligned quadruple-patterning (SAQP).

Fig.1: Plan view schematic of 10nm half-pitch vertical lines overlaid with lower horizontal lines, showing the potential for edge-placement error (EPE). (Source: Y. Borodovsky, SPIE)

Happening the day before the official start of SPIE-AL, Nikon’s LithoVision event featured a talk by Intel Fellow and director of lithography hardware solutions Mark Phillips on the big picture of how the industry may continue to pattern smaller IC device features. Regarding the timing of Intel’s planned use of EUV litho technology, Phillips re-iterated that, “It’s highly desirable for the 7nm node, but we’ll only use it when it’s ready. However, EUVL will remain expensive even at full productivity, so 193i and multi-patterning will continue to be used. In particular we’ll need continued improvement in the 193i tools to meet overlay.”

Yuichi Shibazaki— Nikon Fellow and the main architect of the current generation of Nikon steppers—explained that the current generation of 193i steppers, featuring throughputs of >200 wafers per hour, have already been optimized to the point of diminishing returns. “In order to improve a small amount of performance it requires a lot of expense. So just improving tool performance may not decrease chip costs.” Nikon’s latest productivity offering is a converted alignment station as a stand-alone tool, intended to measure every product wafer before lithography to allow for feed-forward tuning of any stepper; cost and cost-of-ownership may be disclosed after the first beta-site tool reaches a customer by the end of this year.

“The 193 immersion technology continues to make steady progress, but there are not as many new game-changing developments,” confided Michael Lercel, Director of Strategic Marketing for ASML in an exclusive interview with SemiMD. “A major theme of several SPIE papers is on EPE, which traditionally we looked at as dependent upon CD and overlay. Now we’re looking at EPE in patterning more holistically, with need to control the complexity with different error-variables. The more information we can get the more we can control.”

At LithoVision this year, John Sturtevant—SPIE Fellow, and director of RET product development in the Design to Silicon Division at Mentor Graphics—discussed the challenges of controlling variability in multi-layer patterning. “A key challenge is predicting and then mitigating total EPE control,” reminded Sturtevant. “We’ve always paid attention to it, but the budgets that are available today are smaller than ever. Edge-placement is very important ” At the leading edge, there are multiple steps within the basic litho flow that induce proximity/local-neighbor effects which must be accounted for in EDA:  mask making, photoresist exposure, post-exposure bake (PEB), pattern development, and CD-SEM inspection (wherein there is non-zero resist shrinkage).

Due to the inherent physics of EUV lithography, as well as the atomic-scale non-uniformities in the reflective mirrors focusing onto the wafer, EUV exposure tools show significant variation in exposure uniformities. “For any given slit position there can be significant differences between tools. In practice we have used a single model of OPC for all slit locations in all scanners in the fab, and that paradigm may have to change,” said Sturtevant. “It’s possible that because the variation across the scanner is as much as the variation across the slit, it could mean we’ll need scanner-specific cross-slit computational lithography.” More than 3nm variation has been seen across 4 EUVL steppers, and the possible need for tool-specific optical proximity correction (OPC) and source-mask optimization (SMO) would be horrible for managing masks in HVM.

Thin Films Extend Patterning Resolution

Applied Materials has led the industry in thin-film depositions and etches for decades, and the company’s production proven processing platforms are being used more and more to extend the resolution of lithography. For SADP and SAQP MP, there are tunable unit-processes established for sidewall-spacer depositions, and chemical downstream etching chambers for mandrel pull with extreme material selectivity. CVD of dielectric and metallic hard-masks when combined with highly anisotropic plasma etching allows for device-specific and mask-specific pattern transfers that can reduce the line width/edge roughness (LWR/LER) originally present in the photoresist. Figure 2 from the SPIE-AL presentation “Impact of Materials Engineering on Edge Placement Error” by Regina Freed, Ying Zhang, and Uday Mitra of Applied Materials, shows LER reduction from 3.4 to 1.3 nm is possible after etch. The company’s Sym3 chamber features very high gas conductance to prevent etch byproducts from dissociation and re-deposition on resist sidewalls.

Fig.2: 3D schematics (top) and plan view SEM images (bottom) showing that control of plasma parameters can tune the byproducts of etch processes to significantly reduce the line-width roughness (LWR) of minimally scaled lines. (Source: Applied Materials)

TEL’s new SAQP spacer-on-spacer process builds on the work shown last year, using oxide as first spacer and TiO2 as second spacer. Now TEL is exploring silicon as the mandrel, then silicon-nitride as the first spacer, and titanium-oxide as second spacer. This new flow can be tuned so that all-dry etch in a single plasma etch chamber can be used for the final mandrel pull and pattern transfer steps.

Coventor’s 3D modeling software allows companies to do process integration experiments in virtual space, allowing for estimation of yield-losses in pattern transfer due to variations in side-wall profiles and LER. A simulation of 9 SRAM cells with 54 transistors shows that photoresist sidewall taper angle determines both the size and the variability of the final fins. The final capacitance of low-k dielectric in dual-damascene copper metal interconnects can be simulated as a function of the initial photoresist profile in a SAQP flow.

—E.K.

Innovations at 7nm to Keep Moore’s Law Alive

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

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By Dave Lammers, Contributing Editor

Despite fears that Moore’s Law improvements are imperiled, the innovations set to come in at the 7nm node this year and next may disprove the naysayers. EUV lithography is likely to gain a toehold at the 7nm node, competing with multi-patterning and, if all goes well, shortening manufacturing cycles. Cobalt may replace tungsten in an effort to reduce resistance-induced delays at the contacts, a major challenge with finFET transistors, experts said.

While the industry did see a slowdown in Moore’s Law cost reductions when double patterning became necessary several years ago, Scotten Jones, who runs a semiconductor consultancy focused on cost analysis, said Intel and the leading foundries are back on track in terms of node-to-node cost improvements.

Speaking at the recent SEMI Industry Strategy Symposium (ISS), Jones said his cost modeling backs up claims made by Intel, GlobalFoundries, and others that their leading-edge processes deliver on die costs. Cost improvements stalled at TSMC for the16nm node due to multi-patterning, Jones said. “That pause at TSMC fooled a lot of people. The reality now may surprise those people who said Moore’s Law was dead. I don’t believe that, and many technologists don’t believe that either,” he said.

As Intel has adopted a roughly 2.5-year cadence for its more-aggressive node scaling, Jones said “the foundries are now neck and neck with Intel on density.” Intel has reached best-ever yield levels with its finFET-based process nodes, and the foundries also report reaching similar yield levels for their FinFET processes. “It is hard, working up the learning curve, but these companies have shown we can get there,” he said.

IC Knowledge cost models show the chip industry is succeeding in scaling density and costs. (Source: Scotten Jones presentation at 2017 SEMI ISS)

TSMC, spurred by its contract with Apple to supply the main iPhone processors, is expected to be first to ship its 7nm products late this year, though its design rules (contacted poly pitch and minimum metal pitch) are somewhat close to Intel’s 10nm node.

While TSMC and GlobalFoundries are expected to start 7nm production using double and quadruple patterning, they may bring in EUV lithography later. TSMC has said publicly it plans to exercise EUV in parallel with 193i manufacturing for the 7nm node. Samsung has put its stake in the ground to use EUV rather than quadruple patterning in 2018 for critical layers of its 7nm process. Jones, president of IC Knowledge LLC, said Intel will have the most aggressive CPP and MPP pitches for its 7nm technology, and is likely to use EUV in 2019-2020 to push its metal pitches to the minimum possible with EUV scanners.

EUV progress at imec

In an interview at the 62nd International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) in San Francisco in early December, An Steegen, the senior vice president of process technology at Imec (Leuven, Belgium), said Imec researchers are using an ASML NXE 3300B scanner with 0.3 NA optics and an 80-Watt power supply to pattern about 50 wafers per hour.

“The stability on the tool, the up time, has improved quite a lot, to 55 percent. In the best weeks we go well above 70 percent. That is where we are at today. The next step is a 125-Watt power supply, which should start rolling out in the field, and then 250 Watts.”

Steegen said progress is being made in metal-containing EUV resists, and in development of pellicles “which can withstand hydrogen in the chamber.”

If those challenges can be met, EUV would enable single patterning for vias and several metal layers in the middle of the line (MOL), using cut masks to print the metal line ends. “For six or seven thin wires and vias, at the full (7nm node) 32nm pitch, you can do it with a single exposure by going to EUV. The capability is there,” Steegen said.

TSMC’s 7nm development manager, S.Y. Wu, speaking at IEDM, said quadruple patterning and etch (4P4E) will be required for critical layers until EUV reaches sufficient maturity. “EUV is under development (at TSMC), and we will use 7nm as the test vehicle.”

Huiming Bu was peppered with questions following a presentation of the IBM Alliance 7nm technology at IEDM.

Huiming Bu, who presented the IBM Alliance 7nm paper at IEDM, said “EUV delivers significant depth of field (DoF) improvement” compared with the self-aligned quadruple (SAQP) required for the metal lines with immersion scanners.

A main advantage for EUV compared with multi-patterning is that designs would spend fewer days in the fabs. Speaking at ISS, Gary Patton, the chief technology officer at GlobalFoundries, said EUV could result in 30-day reductions in fab cycle times, compared with multiple patterning with 193nm immersion scanners, based on 1.5 days of cycle time per mask layer.

Moreover, EUV patterns would produce less variation in electrical performance and enable tighter process parameters, Patton said.

Since designers have become accustomed to using several colors to identify multi-patterning layers for the 14nm node, the use of double and quadruple patterning at the 7nm node would not present extraordinary design challenges. Moving from multi-patterning to EUV will be largely transparent to design teams as foundries move from multi-patterning to EUV for critical layers.

Interconnect resistance challenges

As interconnects scale and become more narrow, signals can slow down as electrons get caught up in the metal grain boundaries. Jones estimates that as much as 85 percent of parasitic capacitance is in the contacts.

For the main interconnects, nearly two decades ago, the industry began a switch from aluminum to copper. Tungsten has been used for the contacts, vias, and other metal lines near the transistor, partly out of concerns that copper atoms would “poison” the nearby transistors.

Tungsten worked well, partly because the bi-level liner – tantalum nitride at the interface with the inter-level dielectric (ILD) and tantalum at the metal lines – was successful at protecting against electromigration. The TaN-Ta liner is needed because the fluorine-based CVD processes can attack the silicon. For tungsten contacts, Ti serves to getter oxygen, and TiN – which has high resistance — serves as an oxygen and fluorine barrier.

However, as contacts and MOL lines shrunk, the thickness of the liner began to equal the tungsten metal thicknesses.

Dan Edelstein, an IBM fellow who led development of IBM’s industry-leading copper interconnect process, said a “pinch point” has developed for FinFETs at the point where contacts meet the middle-of-the-line (MOL) interconnects.

“With cobalt, there is no fluorine in the deposition process. There is a little bit of barrier, which can be either electroplated or deposited by CVD, and which can be polished by CMP. Cobalt is fairly inert; it is a known fab-friendly metal,” Edelstein said, due to its longstanding use as a silicide material.

As the industry evaluated cobalt, Edelstein said researchers have found that cobalt “doesn’t present a risk to the device. People have been dropping it in, and while there are still some bugs that need to be worked out, it is not that hard to do. And it gives a big change in performance,” he said.

Annealing advantages to Cobalt

Contacts are a “pinch point” and the industry may switch to cobalt (Source: Applied Materials)

An Applied Materials senior director, Mike Chudzik, writing on the company’s blog, said the annealing step during contact formation also favors cobalt: “It’s not just the deposition step for the bulk fill involved – there is annealing as well. Co has a higher thermal budget making it possible to anneal, which provides a superior, less granular fill with no seams and thus lowers overall resistance and improves yield,” Chudzik explained.

Increasing the volume of material in the contact and getting more current through is critical at the 7nm node. “Pretty much every chipmaker is working aggressively to alleviate this issue. They understand if it’s not resolved then it won’t matter what else is done with the device to try and boost performance,” Chudzik said.

Prof. Koike strikes again

Innovations underway at a Japanese university aim to provide a liner between the cobalt contact fill material and the adjacent materials. At a Sunday short course preceding the IEDM, Reza Arghavani of Lam Research said that by creating an alloy of cobalt and approximately 10 percent titanium, “magical things happen” at the interfaces for the contact, M0 and M1 layers.

The idea for adding titanium arose from Prof. Junichi Koike at Tohoku University, the materials scientist who earlier developed a manganese-copper solution for improved copper interconnects. For contacts and MOL, the Co-Ti liner prevents diffusion into the spacer oxide, Arghavani said. “There is no (resistance) penalty for the liner, and it is thermally stable, up to 400 to 500 degrees C. It is a very promising material, and we are working on it. W (tungsten) is being pushed as far as it can go, but cobalt is being actively pursued,” he said.

Stressor changes ahead

Presentations at the 2016 IEDM by the IBM Alliance (IBM, GlobalFoundries, and Samsung) described the use of a stress relaxed buffer (SRB) layer to induce stress, but that technique requires solutions for the defects introduced in the silicon layer above it. As a result of that learning process, SRB stress techniques may not come into the industry until the 5 nm node, or a second-generation 7nm node.

Technology analyst Dick James, based in Ottawa, said over the past decade companies have pushed silicon-germanium stressors for the PFET transistors about as far as practical.

“The stress mechanisms have changed since Intel started using SiGe at the 90nm node. Now, companies are a bit mysterious, and nobody is saying what they are doing. They can’t do tensile nitride anymore at the NFET; there is precious little room to put linear stress into the channel,” he said.

The SRB technique, James said, is “viable, but it depends on controlling the defects.” He noted that Samsung researchers presented work on defects at the IEDM in December. “That was clearly a research paper, and adding an SRB in production volumes is different than doing it in an R&D lab.”

James noted that scaling by itself helps maintain stress levels, even as the space for the stressor atoms becomes smaller. “If companies shorten the gate length and keep the same stress as before, the stress per nanometer at least maintains itself.”

Huiming Bu, the IBM researcher, was optimistic, saying that the IBM Alliance work succeeded at adding both compressive and tensile strain. The SRB/SSRW approach used by the IBM Alliance was “able to preserve a majority – 75 percent – of the stress on the substrate.”

Jones, the IC Knowledge analyst, said another area of intense interest in research is high-mobility channels, including the use of SiGe channel materials in the PMOS FinFETS.

He also noted that for the NMOS finFETs, “introducing tensile stress in fins is very challenging, with lots of integration issues.” Jones said using an SRB layer is a promising path, but added: “My point here is: Will it be implemented at 7 nm? My guess is no.”

Putting it in a package

Steegen said innovation is increasingly being done by the system vendors, as they figure out how to combine different ICs in new types of packages that improve overall performance.

System companies, faced with rising costs for leading-edge silicon, are figuring out “how to add functionality, by using packaging, SOC partitioning and then putting them together in the package to deliver the logic, cache, and IOs with the right tradeoffs,” she said.

Photonics in Silicon R&D Toward Tb/s

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

The client:server computing paradigm colloquially referred to as the “Cloud” results in a need for extremely efficient Cloud server hardware, and from first principles the world can save a lot of energy resources if servers run on photonics instead of electronics. Though the potential for cost-savings is well known, the challenge of developing cost-effective integrated photonics solutions remains. Today, discrete compound-semiconductor chips function as transmitters, multiplexers (MUX), and receivers of photons, while many global organizations pursue the vision of lower-cost integrated silicon (Si) photonics circuits.

Work on photonics chips—using light as logic elements in an integrated circuit—built in silicon (Si) has accelerated recently with announcements of new collaborative research and development (R&D) projects. Leti, an institute of CEA Tech, announced the launch of a European Commission Horizon 2020 “COSMICC” project to enable mass commercialization of Si-photonics-based transceivers to meet future data-transmission requirements in data centers and super computing systems.

The Leti-coordinated COSMICC project will combine CMOS electronics and Si-photonics with innovative fiber-attachment techniques to achieve 1 Tb/s data rates. These scalable solutions will provide performance improvement an order of magnitude better than current VCSELs transceivers, and the COSMICC-developed technology will address future data-transmission needs with a target cost per bit that traditional wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) transceivers cannot meet. The project’s 11 partners from five countries are focusing on developing mid-board optical transceivers with data rates up to 2.4 Tb/s with 200 Gb/s per fiber using 12 fibers. The devices will consume less than 2 pJ/bit. and cost approximately 0.2 Euros/Gb/s.

Figure 1: Schematic of COSMICC on-board optical transceiver at 2.4 Tb/s using 50 Gbps/wavelength, 4 CWDM wavelengths per fiber, 12 fibers for transmission and 12 fibers for reception. (Source: Leti)

A first improvement will be the introduction of a silicon-nitride (SiN) layer that will allow development of temperature-insensitive MUX/DEMUX devices for coarse WDM operation, and will serve as an intermediate wave-guiding layer for optical input/output. The partners will also evaluate capacitive modulators, slow-wave depletion modulators with 1D periodicity, and more advanced approaches. These include GeSi electro-absorption modulators with tunable Si composition and photonic crystal electro-refraction modulators to make micrometer-scale devices. In addition, a hybrid III-V on Si laser will be integrated in the SOI/SiN platform in the more advanced transmitter circuits.

Meanwhile in the United States, Coventor, Inc. is collaborating with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on photonics modeling. MIT is a key player in the AIM Photonics program, a federally funded, public-private partnership established to advance domestic capabilities in integrated photonic technology and strengthen high-tech U.S.-based manufacturing. Coventor will provide its SEMulator3D process modeling platform to model the effect of process variation in the development of photonic integrated components.

“Coventor’s technical expertise in predicting the manufacturability of advanced technologies is outstanding. Our joint collaboration with Coventor will help us develop new design methods for achieving high yield and high performance in integrated photonic applications,” said Professor Duane Boning of MIT. Boning is an expert at modeling non-linear effects in processing, many years after working on the semiconductor industry’s reference model for the control of chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) processing.

—E.K.

MRAM Takes Center Stage at IEDM 2016

Monday, December 12th, 2016

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By Dave Lammers, Contributing Editor

The IEDM 2016 conference, held in early December in San Francisco, was somewhat of a coming-out party for magneto-resistive memory (MRAM). The MRAM presentations at IEDM were complemented by a special MRAM-focused poster session – organized by the IEEE Magnetics Society in cooperation with the IEEE Electron Devices Society (EDS) – with 33 posters and a lively crowd.

And in the opening keynote speech of the 62nd International Electron Devices Meeting, Seok-hee Lee, executive vice president at SK Hynix (Seoul), set the stage by saying that the race is on between DRAM and emerging memories such as MRAM. “Originally, people thought that DRAM scaling would stop. Then engineers in the DRAM and NAND worlds worked hard and pushed out the end further in the future,” he said.

While cautioning that MRAM bit cells are larger than in DRAM and thus more more costly, Lee said MRAM has “very strong potential in embedded memory.”

SK Hynix is not the only company with a full-blown MRAM development effort underway. Samsung, which earlier bought MRAM startup Grandis and which has a materials-related research relationship with IBM, attracted a standing-room-only crowd to its MRAM paper at IEDM. TSMC is working with TDK on its program, and Sony is using 300mm wafers to build high-performance MRAMs for startup Avalanche Technology.

And one knowledgeable source said “the biggest processor company also has purchased a lot of equipment” for its MRAM development effort.

Dave Eggleston, vice president of emerging memory at GlobalFoundries, said he believes GlobalFoundries is the furthest along on the MRAM optimization curve, partly due to its technology and manufacturing partnership with Everspin Technologies (Chandler, Ariz.). Everspin has been working on MRAM for more than 20 years, and has shipped nearly 60 million discrete MRAMs, largely to the cache buffering and industrial markets.

GlobalFoundries has announced plans to use embedded STT-MRAM in its 22FDX platform, which uses fully-depleted SOI technology, as early as 2018.

Future versions of MRAM– such as spin orbit torque (SOT) MRAM and Voltage Controlled MRAM — could compete with SRAM and DRAM. Analysts said today’s spin-transfer torque STT-MRAM – referring to the torque that arises from the transfer of electron spins to the free magnetic layer — is vying for commercial adoption as ever-faster processors need higher performance memory subsystems.

STT-MRAM is fast enough to fit in as a new memory layer below the processor and the SRAM-based L1/L2 cache layers, and above DRAM and storage-level NAND flash layers, said Gary Bronner, vice president of research at Rambus Inc.

With good data retention and speed, and medium density, MRAM “may have advantages in the lower-level caches” of systems which have large amounts of on-chip SRAM, Bronner said, due in part to MRAM’s smaller cell size than six-transistor SRAM. While DRAM in the sub-20nm nodes faces cost issues as its moves to more complex capacitor structures, Bronner said that “thus far STT-MRAM) is not cheaper than DRAM.”

IBM researchers, which pioneered the spin-transfer torque approach to MRAM, are working on a high-performance MRAM technology which could be used in servers.

As of now, MRAM density is limited largely by the size of the transistors required to drive sufficient current to the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) to flip its magnetic orientation. Dan Edelstein, an IBM fellow working on MRAM development at IBM Research, said “it is a tall order for MRAM to replace DRAM. But MRAM could be used in system-level memory architectures and as an embedded memory technology.”

PVD and etch challenges

Edelstein, who was a key figure in developing copper interconnects at IBM some twenty years ago, said MRAM only requires a few extra mask layers to be integrated into the BEOL in logic. But there remain major challenges in improving the throughput of the PVD deposition steps required to deposit the complex material stack and to control the interfacial layers.

The PVD steps must deposit approximately 30 layers and control them to Angstrom-level precision. Deposition must occur under very low base pressure, and in oxygen- and water-vapor free environments. While tool vendors are working on productization of 300mm MRAM deposition tools, Edelstein said keeping particles under control and minimizing the maintenance and chamber cleaning are all challenging.

Etching the complex materials stack is even harder. Chemical RIE is not practical for MRAMs at this point, and using ion beam etching (IBE) presents challenges in terms of avoiding re-deposition of material sputtered off during the IBE etch steps for the high-aspect-ratio MTJs.

For the tool vendors, MRAMs present challenges as companies go from R&D to high-volume manufacturing, Edelstein said.

A Samsung MRAM researcher, Y.J. Song, briefly described IBE challenges during an IEDM presentation describing an embedded STT-MRAM with a respectable 8-Mbit density and a cell size of .0364 sq. micron. “We worked to optimize the contact etching,” using IBE etch during the patterning steps, he said. The short fail rate was reduced, while keeping the processing temperature at less than 350°C, Song said.

Samsung embedded an STT-MRAM module in the copper back end of the line (BEOL) of a 28nm logic process. (Source: Samsung presentation at IEDM 2016).

Many of the presentations at IEDM described improvements in key parameters, such as the tunnel magnetic resistance (TMR), cell size, data retention, and read error rates at high temperatures or low operating voltages.

An SK Hynix presentation described a 4-Gbit STT-MRAM optimized as a stand-alone, high-density memory. “There still are reliability issues for high-density MRAM memory,” said SK Hynix’s S.-W. Chung. The industry needs to boost the TMR “as high as possible” and work on improving the “not sufficiently long” retention times.

At high temperatures, error rates tend to rise, a concern in certain applications. And since devices are subjected to brief periods of high temperatures during reflow soldering, that issue must be dealt with as well, detailed by a Bosch presentation at IEDM.

Cleans and encapsulation important

Gouri Sankar Kar, who is coordinating the MRAM research program at the Imec consortium (Leuven, Belgium), said one challenge is to reduce the cell size and pitch without damaging the magnetic properties of the magnetic tunnel junction. For the 28nm logic node, embedded MRAM would be in the range of a 200nm pitch and 45nm critical dimensions (CDs). At the IEDM poster session, Imec presented an 8nm cell size STT-MRAM that could intersect the 10nm logic node, with the MRAM pitch in the 100nm range. GlobalFoundries, Micron, Qualcomm, Sony and TSMC are among the participants in the Imec MRAM effort.

Kar said in addition to the etch challenges, post-patterning treatment and the encapsulation liner can have a major impact on MTJ materials selection. “Some metals can be cleaned immediately, and some not. For the materials stack, patterning (litho and etch) and clean optimization are crucial.”

“Chemical etch (RIE) is not really possible at this stage. All the tool vendors are working on physical sputter etch (IBE) where they can limit damage. But I would say all the major tool vendors at this point have good tools,” Kar said.

To reach volume manufacturing, tool vendors need to improve the tool up-time and reduce the maintenance cycles. There is a “tail bits” relationship between the rate of bit failures and the health of the chambers that still needs improvement. “The cleanup steps after etching are very, very critical” to the overall effort to improving the cost effectiveness of MRAM, Kar said, adding that he is “very positive” about the future of MRAM technology.

A complete flow at AMAT

Applied Materials is among the equipment companies participating in the Imec program, with TEL and Canon-Anelva also heavily involved. Beyond that, Applied has developed a complete MRAM manufacturing flow at the company’s Dan Maydan Center in Santa Clara, and presented its cooperative work with Qualcomm on MRAM development at IEDM.

In an interview, Er-Xuan Ping, the Applied Materials managing director in charge of memory and materials technologies, said about 20 different layers, including about ten different materials, must be deposited to create the magnetic tunnel junctions. As recently as a few years ago, throughput of this materials stack was “extremely slow,” he said. But now Applied’s multi-cathode PVD tool, specially developed for MRAM deposition, can deposit 5 Angstrom films in just a few seconds. Throughput is approaching 20 wafers per hour.

Applied Materials “basically created a brand-new PVD chamber” for STT-MRAM, and he said the tool has a new e-chuck, optimized chamber walls and a multi-cathode design.

The MRAM-optimized PVD tool does not have an official name yet, and Ping said he refers to it as multi-cathode PVD. With MRAM requiring deposition of so many different metals and other materials, the Applied tool does not require the wafer to be moved in and out, increasing efficiency. The shape and structure of the chamber wall, Ping said, allow absorption of downstream plasma material so that it doesn’t come back as particles.

For etch, Applied has worked to create etching processes that result in very low bit failure rates, but at relatively relaxed pitches in the 130-200nm range. “We have developed new etch technologies so we don’t think etch will be a limiting factor. But etch is still challenging, especially for cells with 50nm and smaller cell sizes. We are still in unknown territory there,” said Ping.

Jürgen Langer, R&D manager at Singulus Technology (Frankfurt, Germany), said Singulus has developed a production-optimized PVD tool which can deposit “30 material layers in the Angstrom range. We can get 20 wafers per hour throughputs, so I would say this is not a beta tool, it is for production.”

Jürgen Langer, R&D manager, presented a poster on MRAM deposition from Singulus Technology (Frankfurt, Germany).

Where does it fit?

Once the production challenges of making MRAM are ironed out, the question remains: Where will MRAM fit in the systems of tomorrow?

Tom Coughlin, a data storage consultant based in Atascadero, Calif., said embedded MRAM “could have a very important effect for industrial and consumer devices. MRAM could be part of the memory cache layers, providing power advantages over other non-volatile devices.” And with its ability to power on and power off without expending energy, MRAM could reduce overall power consumption in smart phones, cutting in to the SRAM and NOR sectors.

“MRAM definitely has a niche, replacing some DRAM and SRAM. It may replace NOR. Flash will continue for mass storage, and then there is the 3D Crosspoint from Intel. I do believe MRAM has a solid basis for being part of that menagerie. We are almost in a Cambrian explosion in memory these days,” Coughlin said.

Process Control Deals with Big Data, Busy Engineers

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

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By Dave Lammers, Contributing Editor

Turning data into insights that will improve fab productivity is one of the semiconductor industry’s biggest opportunities, one that experts say requires a delicate mix between automation and human expertise.

A year ago, after the 2015 Advanced Process Control (APC) conference in Austin, attendees said one of their challenges was that it takes too long to create the fault detection and classification (FDC) models that alert engineers when something is amiss in a process step.

“The industry listened,” said Brad van Eck, APC conference co-chairman. Participants at the 2016 APC in Phoenix heard progress reports from device makers as diverse as Intel, Qorvo, Seagate, and TSMC, as well as from key APC software vendors including Applied Materials, Bistel, and others.

Steve Chadwick, principal engineer for manufacturing IT at Intel, described the challenge in a keynote address. IC manufacturers which have spent billions of dollars on semiconductor equipment are seeking new ways to maximize their investments.

Steve Chadwick

“We all want to increase our quality, make the product in the best time, get the most good die out, and all of that. Time to market can be a game changer. That is universal to the manufacturing space,” Chadwick said.

“Every time we have a new generation of processor, we double the data size. Roughly a gigabyte of information is collected on every wafer, and we sort thousands of wafers a day,” Chadwick said. The result is petabytes of data which needs to be stored, analyzed, and turned into actionable “wisdom.”

Intel has invested in data centers located close their factories, making sure they have the processing power to handle data coming in from roughly 5 billion sensor data points collected each day at a single Intel factory.

“We have to take all of this raw data that we have in a data store and apply some kind of business logic to it. We boil it down to ‘wisdom,’ telling someone something they didn’t know beforehand.”

In a sense, technology is catching up, as Hadoop and several other data search engines are adopted to big data. Also, faster processors allow servers to analyze problems in 15 seconds or less, compared to several hours a few years ago.

Where all of this gets interesting is in figuring out how to relate to busy engineers who don’t want to be bothered with problems that don’t directly concern them. Chadwick detailed the notification problem at Intel fabs, particularly as engineers use smart phones and tablets to receive alarms. “Engineers are busy, and so you only tell them something they need to know. Sometimes engineers will say, ‘Hey, Steve, you just notified my phone of 500 things that I can’t do anything about. Can you cut it out?’”

Notification must be prioritized, and the best option in many cases is to avoid notifiying a person at all, instead sending a notification to an expert system. If that is not an option, the notification has to be tailored to the device the engineer is using. Intel is moving quickly to HTML 5-based data due largely to its portability across multiple devices, he added.

With more than half a million ad hoc jobs per week, Intel’s approach is to keep data and analysis close to the factory, processing whenever possible in the local geography. Instead of shipping data to a distant data center for analysis, the normal procedure is to ship the small analysis code to a very large data set.

False positives decried

Fault detection and classification (FDC) models are difficult to create and oftentimes overly sensitive, resulting in false alarms. These widely used, manually created FDC models can take two weeks or longer to set up. While they take advantage of subject-matter-expert (SME) knowledge and are easy to understand, tool limits tend to be costly to set up and manage, with a high level of false positives and missed alarms.

An Applied Materials presentation — by Parris Hawkins, James Moyne, Jimmy Iskandar, Brad Schulze, and Mike Armacost – detailed work that Applied is doing in cooperation with process control researchers at the University of Cincinnati. The goal is to develop next-generation FDC that leverages Big Data, prediction analytics, and expert engineers to combine automated model development with inputs from human experts.

Fully automated solutions are plagued with significant false positives/negatives, and are “generally not very useful,” said Hawkins. By incorporating metrology and equipment health data, a form of “supervised” model creation can result in more accurate process controls, he said.

The model creation effort first determines which sensors and trace features are relevant, and then optimizes the tool limits and other parameters. The goal is to find the optimum between too-wide limits that fail to alert when faults are existent, and overly tight limits which set off false alarms too often.

Next-generation FDC would leverage Big Data and human expertise. (Source: Applied Materials presentation at APC 2016).

Full-trace FDC

BISTel has developed an approach called Dynamic Full Trace FDC. Tom Ho, president of BISTel USA, presented the work in conjunction with Qorvo engineers, where a beta version of the software is being used.

Tom Ho

Ho said Dynamic Full Trace FDC starts with the notion that the key to manufacturing is repeatability, and in a stable manufacturing environment “anything that differs, isn’t routine, it is an indication of a mis-process and should not be repeatable. Taking that concept, then why not compare a wafer to everything that is supposed to repeat. Based on that, in an individual wafer process, the neighboring wafer becomes the model.”

The full-trace FDC approach has a limited objective: to make an assessment whether the process is good or bad. It doesn’t recommend adjustments, as a run-to-run tool might.

The amount of data involved is small, because it is confined to that unique process recipe. And because the neighboring trace is the model, there is no need for the time-consuming model creation mentioned so often at APC 2016. Compute power can be limited to a personal computer for an individual tool.

Ho took the example of an etch process that might have five recipe steps, starting with pumping down the chamber to the end point where the plasma is turned off. Dynamic full-trace FDC assumes that most wafers will receive a good etch process, and it monitors the full trace to cover the entire process.

“There is no need for a model, because the model is your neighboring trace,” he said. “It definitely saves money in multiple ways. With the rollout of traditional FDC, each tool type can take a few weeks to set up the model and make sure it is running correctly. For multiple tool types that can take a few months. And model maintenance is another big job,” he said.

For the most part, the dynamic full-trace software runs on top of the Bistel FDC platform, though it could be used with another FDC vendor “if the customer has access to the raw trace data,” he said.

2D Materials May Be Brittle

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

International researchers using a novel in situ quantitative tensile testing platform have tested the uniform in-plane loading of freestanding membranes of 2D materials inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Led by materials researchers at Rice University, the in situ tensile testing reveals the brittle fracture of large-area molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) crystals and measures their fracture strength for the first time. Borophene monolayers with a wavy topography are more flexible.

A communication to Advanced Materials online (DOI: 10.1002/adma.201604201) titled “Brittle Fracture of 2D MoSe2” by Yinchao Yang et al. disclosed work by researchers from the USA and China led by Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering Professor Jun Lou at Rice University, Houston, Texas. His team found that MoSe2 is more brittle than expected, and that flaws as small as one missing atom can initiate catastrophic cracking under strain.

“It turns out not all 2D crystals are equal. Graphene is a lot more robust compared with some of the others we’re dealing with right now, like this molybdenum diselenide,” says Lou. “We think it has something to do with defects inherent to these materials. It’s very hard to detect them. Even if a cluster of vacancies makes a bigger hole, it’s difficult to find using any technique.” The team has posted a short animation online showing crack propagation.

2D Materials in a 3D World -222

While all real physical things in our world are inherently built as three-dimensional (3D) structures, a single layer of flat atoms approximates a two-dimensional (2D) structure. Except for special superconducting crystals frozen below the Curie temperature, when electrons flow through 3D materials there are always collisions which increase resistance and heat. However, certain single layers of crystals have atoms aligned such that electron transport is essentially confined within the 2D plane, and those electrons may move “ballistically” without being slowed by collisions.

MoSe2 is a dichalcogenide, a 2D semiconducting material that appears as a graphene-like hexagonal array from above but is actually a sandwich of Mo atoms between two layers of Se chalcogen atoms. MoSe2 is being considered for use as transistors and in next-generation solar cells, photodetectors, and catalysts as well as electronic and optical devices.

The Figure shows the micron-scale sample holder inside a SEM, where natural van der Waals forces held the sample in place on springy cantilever arms that measured the applied stress. Lead-author Yang is a postdoctoral researcher at Rice who developed a new dry-transfer process to exfoliate MoSe2 from the surface upon which it had been grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD).

Custom built micron-scale mechanical jig used to test mechanical properties of nano-scale materials. (Source: Lou Group/Rice University)

The team measured the elastic modulus—the amount of stretching a material can handle and still return to its initial state—of MoSe2 at 177.2 (plus or minus 9.3) gigapascals (GPa). Graphene is more than five times as elastic. The fracture strength—amount of stretching a material can handle before breaking—was measured at 4.8 (plus or minus 2.9) GPa. Graphene is nearly 25 times stronger.

“The important message of this work is the brittle nature of these materials,” Lou says. “A lot of people are thinking about using 2D crystals because they’re inherently thin. They’re thinking about flexible electronics because they are semiconductors and their theoretical elastic strength should be very high. According to our calculations, they can be stretched up to 10 percent. The samples we have tested so far broke at 2 to 3 percent (of the theoretical maximum) at most.”

Borophene

“Wavy” borophene might be better, according to finding of other Rice University scientists. The Rice lab of theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and experimental collaborators observed examples of naturally undulating metallic borophene—an atom-thick layer of boron—and suggested that transferring it onto an elastic surface would preserve the material’s stretchability along with its useful electronic properties.

Highly conductive graphene has promise for flexible electronics, but it is too stiff for devices that must repeatably bend, stretch, compress, or even twist. The Rice researchers found that borophene deposited on a silver substrate develops nanoscale corrugations, and due to weak binding to the silver can be exfoliated for transfer to a flexible surface. The research appeared recently in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters.

Rice University has been one of the world’s leading locations for the exploration of 1D and 2D materials research, ever since it was lucky enough to get a visionary genius like Richard Smalley to show up in 1976, so we should expect excellent work from people in their department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering (CSNE). Still, this ground-breaking work is being done in labs using tools capable of handling micron-scale substrates, so even after a metaphorical “path” has been found it will take a lot of work to build up a manufacturing roadway capable of fabricating meter-scale substrates.

—E.K.

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