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Posts Tagged ‘Presto Engineering’

Test Protocols for the IoT

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) will require components that can sense the world, process and store data, and communicate autonomously within a secured environment. Consequently, IoT devices must incorporate sensors, wireless communication at Radio Frequencies (RF), logic, and embedded memory. Integrated circuit (IC) chips for IoT applications will have to be created at low cost in High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) lines, for which there are unique challenges with design and test. Presto Engineering’s founder and president, Michel Villemain, spoke with the Show Daily about how his company’s test services can accelerate the time-to-market and reduce risk in creating new IoT chip products.

“We started 10 years ago, and were differentiated on RF,” explained Villemain. “We now have a good view on what test costs are in production for different chip functionalities. We focus on specific segments of the industry that are not the traditional ‘drivers’ such as SoCs and large digital chips.” Since most IoT devices are expected to use Over The Air (OTA, a.k.a. “wireless”) links, Presto’s expertise in RF test helps create a low-cost solution for customers.

“We see some general trends in this area,” said Villemain. “The first one in IoT is there is a lot of activity in determining proper protocols for communications, as the industry moves from using short-range private area networks to low-power wide-area-networks with range beyond 300 feet. The second trend which is not technical, is that more and more non-semiconductor companies such as ‘system houses’ will be designing chips to reduce costs and increase security.

“The need for security has been reported as one of the main issues in peoples’ minds preventing deployment of the IoT. When security has to be hardware related and implemented in the chip, the only easy way to enable it is with test,” confided Villemain. “Remember that security is not binary. There is a return-on-investment decision based on how easy would it be to break something and how much would it cost to prevent that breakage. There is somewhat of a consensus that hardware-based solutions provide more security for data traveling over a link, so what we are trying to do is lower the cost of adding security at the hardware level.”

For the test of a very large and complex device, all of the digital instructions are generated by the design tools. However, for a primarily analog device the digital is not the core of the design and not the core expertise of the design team. The Figure shows the workflow used by Presto to methodically manage the establishment of rigorous engineering and production flows for IoT ICs.

test protocols

“Provisioning” is defined as the use of embedded Non-Volatile Memory (NVM) such as Flash within a chip to be able to customize the functionality. If you need to test Flash cells and bake, then program the Flash and bake again before final test it calls for up to three probe insertions, so the type of NVM chosen can alter the text protocol needed.

At end end of last month, Presto announced a multi-year supply agreement with NAGRA—a Kudelski Group company in secure digital TV access and management systems—to provide supply chain management and production services for several of NAGRA’s key products in the Pay TV market. “We are delighted that NAGRA has placed trust in Presto to be its production partner for volume products,” said Michel Villemain, CEO, Presto Engineering. “Leveraging team and expertise acquired from INSIDE Secure in 2015, this is a natural complement to our strategy of deploying an independent subcontract back-end manufacturing and supply chain service for the secure card industry and IoT markets.”

IoT Demands Part 2: Test and Packaging

Friday, April 15th, 2016

By Ed Korczynski, Senior Technical Editor, Solid State Technology, SemiMD

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) adds new sensing and communications to improve the functionality of all manner of things in the world. Solid-state and semiconducting materials for new integrated circuits (IC) intended for ubiquitous IoT applications will have to be extremely small and low-cost. To understand the state of technology preparedness to meet the anticipated needs of the different application spaces, experts from GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Cadence, Mentor Graphics and Presto Engineering gave detailed answers to questions about IoT chip needs in EDA and fab nodes, as published in “IoT Demands:  EDA and Fab Nodes.” We continue with the conversation below.

Korczynski: For test of IoT devices which may use ultra-low threshold voltage transistors, what changes are needed compared to logic test of a typical “low-power” chip?

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Susceptibility to process corners and operating conditions becomes heightened at near-threshold voltage levels. This translates into either more conservative design sign-off criteria, or the need for higher levels of manufacturing screening/tests. Either way, it has an impact on cost, be it hidden by over-design, or overtly through more costly qualification and test processes.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

We need to make sure that the testability has also been designed to be functional structurally in this mode. In addition, sub-threshold voltage operation must account for non-linear transistor characteristics and the strong impact of local process variation, for which the conventional testability arsenal is still very poor. Automotive screening used low voltage operation (VLV) to detect latent defects, but at very low voltage close to the transistor threshold, digital becomes analog, and therefore if the usual concept still works for defect detection, functional test and @speed tests require additional expertise to be both meaningful and efficient from a test coverage perspective.

Korczynski:  Do we have sufficient specifications within “5G” to handle IoT device interoperability for all market segments?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

The estimated timeline for standardization availability of 5G is around 2020. 5G is being designed keeping three classes of applications in mind:  Enhanced Mobile Broadband, Massive IoT, and Mission-Critical Control. Specifically for IoT, the focus is on efficient, low-cost communication with deep coverage. We will start to see early 5G technologies start to appear around 2018, and device connectivity,

interoperability and marshaling the data they generate that can apply to multiple IoT sub-segments and markets is still very much in development.

Korczynski:  Will the 1st-generation of IoT devices likely include wide varieties of solution for different market-segments such as industrial vs. retail vs. consumer, or will most device use similar form-factors and underlying technologies?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

If we use CES 2016 as a showcase, we are seeing IoT “Things” that are becoming use-case or application-centric as they apply to specific sub-segments such as Connected Home, Automotive, Medical, Security, etc. There is definitely more variety on the consumer front vs. industrial. Vendors / OEMs / System houses are differentiating at the user-interface design and form-factor levels while the “under-the-hood” IC capabilities and component technologies that provide the atomic intelligence are fairly common. ​

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Right now it seems like everyone is swinging for the fence. Everyone wants the home-run product that will reach a billion devices sold. Generality generally leads to sub-optimality, so a single device usually fails to meet the needs and expectations of many. Devices that are optimized for more specific use cases and elements of purchasing criteria will win out. The question of interface is an interesting one.

Korczynski:  Will there be different product life-cycles for different IoT market-segments, such as 1-3 years for consumer but 5-10 years for industrial?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

That certainly seems to be the case. According to Gartner’s market analysis for IoT, Consumer is expected to grow at a faster pace in terms of units compared to Enterprise, while Enterprise is expected to lead in revenue. Also the churn-cycle in Consumer is higher / faster compared to Enterprise. Today’s wearables or smart-phones are good reference examples. This will however vary by the type of “Thing” and sub-segment. For example, you expect to have your smart refrigerator for a longer time period compared to smart clothing or eyewear. As ASPs of the “Things”come down over time and new classes of products such as disposables hit the market, we can expect even larger volumes.​

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

The market segments continue to be driven by the same use cases. In consumer wearables, short cycles are linked to fashion trends and rapid obsolescence, where consumer home use has longer cycles closer to industrial market requirements. We believe that the lifecycle norms will hold true for IoT devices.

Korczynski:  For the IoT application of infrastructure monitoring (e.g. bridges, pipelines, etc.) long-term (10-20 year) reliability will be essential, while consumer applications may be best served by 3-5 year reliability devices which cost less; how well can we quantify the trade-off between cost and chip reliability?

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Conceptually we know very well how to make devices more reliable. We can lower current densities with bigger wires, we can run at cooler temperatures, and so on.  The difficulty is always in finding optimality for a given criterion across the, for practical purposes, infinite tradeoffs to be made.

Korczynski:  Why is the talk of IoT not just another “Dot Com” hype cycle?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

​​I participated in a panel at SEMICON China in Shanghai last month that discussed a similar question. If we think of IoT as a “brand new thing” (no pun intended), then we can think of it as hype. However if we look at the IoT as as set of use-cases that can take advantage of an evolution of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) going towards broader connectivity, huge amounts of data generated and exchanged, and a generational increase in internet and communication network bandwidths (i.e. 5G), then it seems a more down-to-earth technological progression.

Nicolas Williams, product marketing manager, Mentor Graphics

Unlike the Dot Com hype, which was built upon hope and dreams of future solutions that may or may not have been based in reality, IoT is real business. For example, in a 2016 IC Insights report, we see that last year $63.4 billion in revenue was generated for IoT systems and the market is growing at about 20% CAGR. This same report also shows IoT semiconductor sales of over $15 billion in 2015 with a CAGR of 21.1%.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

It is the investment needed up front to create sensing agents and an infrastructure for the hardware foundation of the IoT that will lead to big data and ultimately value creation.

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

There will be plenty of hype cycles for products and product categories along the way. However, the foundational shift of the connection of things is a diode through which civilization will only pass through in one direction.

IoT Demands Part 1: EDA and Fab Nodes

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is expected to add new sensing and communications to improve the functionality of all manner of things in the world:  bridges sensing and reporting when repairs are needed, parts automatically informing where they are in storage and transport, human health monitoring, etc. Solid-state and semiconducting materials for new integrated circuits (IC) intended for ubiquitous IoT applications will have to be assembled at low-cost and small-size in High Volume Manufacturing (HVM). Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and other sensors are being combined with Radio-Frequency (RF) ICs in miniaturized packages for the first wave of growth in major sub-markets.

To meet the anticipated needs of the different IoT application spaces, SemiMD asked leading companies within critical industry segments about the state of technology preparedness:

*  Commercial IC HVM – GLOBALFOUNDRIES,

*  Electronic Design Automation (EDA) – Cadence and Mentor Graphics,

*  IC and complex system test – Presto Engineering.

Korczynski:  Today, ICs for IoT applications typically use 45nm/65nm-node which are “Node -3″ (N-3) compared to sub-20nm-node chips in HVM. Five years from now, when the bleeding-edge will use 10nm node technology, will IoT chips still use N-3 of 28nm-node (considered a “long-lived node”) or will 45nm-node remain the likely sweet-spot of price:performance?

Timothy Dry, product marketing manager, GLOBALFOUNDRIES

In 5 years time, there will be a spread of technology solutions addressing low, middle, and high ends of IoT applications. At the low end, IoT end nodes for applications like connected smoke

detectors, security sensors will be at 55, 40nm ULP and ULL for lowest system power, and low cost. These applications will be typically served by MCUs <50DMIPs. Integrated radios (BLE, 802.15.4), security, Power Management Unit (PMU), and eFlash or MRAM will be common features. Connected LED lighting is forecasted to be a high volume IoT application. The LED drivers will use BCD extensions of 130nm—40nm—that can also support the radio and protocol-MCU with Flash.

In the mid-range, applications like smart-meters and fitness/medical monitoring will need systems that have more processing power <300DMIPS. These products will be implemented in 40nm, 28nm and GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ new 22nm FDSOI technology that uses software-controlled body-biasing to tune SoC operation for lowest dynamic power. Multiple wireless (BLE/802.15.4, WiFi, LPWAN) and wired connectivity (Ethernet, PLC) protocols with security will be integrated for gateway products.

High-end products like smart-watches, learning thermostats, home security/monitoring cameras, and drones will require MPU-class IC products (~2000DMIPs) and run high-order operating systems (e.g. Linux, Android). These products will be made in leading-edge nodes starting at 22FDX, 14FF and migrating to 7FF and beyond. Design for lowest dynamic power for longest battery life will be the key driver, and these products typically require human machine Interface (HMI) with animated graphics on a high resolution displays. Connectivity will include BLE, WiFi and cellular with strong security.

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

We have seen recent announcements of IoT targeted devices at 14nm. The value created by Moore’s Law integration should hold, and with that, there will be inherent advantages to those who leverage next generation process nodes. Still, other product categories may reach functionality saturation points where there is simply no more value obtained by adding more capability. We anticipate that there will be more “live” process nodes than ever in history.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

It is fair to say that most IoT devices will be a heterogeneous aggregation of analog functions rather than high power digital processors. Therefore, and by similarity with Bluetooth and RFID devices, 90nm and 65nm will remain the mainstream nodes for many sub-vertical markets, enabling the integration of RF and analog front-end functions with digital gate density. By default, sensors will stay out of the monolithic path for both design and cost reasons. The best answer would be that the IoT ASIC will follow eventually the same scaling as the MCU products, with embedded non-volatile memories, which today is 55-40nm centric and will move to 28nm with industry maturity and volumes.

Korczynski:  If most IoT devices will include some manner of sensor which must be integrated with CMOS logic and memory, then do we need new capabilities in EDA-flows and burn-in/test protocols to ensure meeting time-to-market goals?

Nicolas Williams, product marketing manager, Mentor Graphics

If we define a typical IoT device as a product that contains a MEMS sensor, A/D, digital processing, and a RF-connection to the internet, we can see that the fundamental challenge of IoT design is that teams working on this product need to master the analog, digital, MEMS, and RF domains. Often, these four domains require different experience and knowledge and sometimes design in these domains is accomplished by separate teams. IoT design requires that all four domains are designed and work together, especially if they are going on the same die. Even if the components are targeting separate dice that will be bonded together, they still need to work together during the layout and verification process. Therefore, a unified design flow is required.

Stephen Pateras, product marketing director, Mentor Graphics

Being able to quickly debug and create test patterns for various embedded sensor IP can be addressed with the adoption of the new IEEE 1687 IP plug-and-play standard. If a sensor IP block’s digital interface adheres to the standard, then any vendor-provided data required to initialize or operate the embedded sensor can be easily and quickly mapped to chip pins. Data sequences for multiple sensor IP blocks can also be merged to create optimized sequences that will minimize debug and test times.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

From a testing standpoint, widely used ATEs are generally focused on a few purposes, but don’t necessarily cover all elements in a system. We think that IoT devices are likely to require complex testing flows using multiple ATEs to assure adequate coverage. This is likely to prevail for some time as short run volumes characteristic of IoT demands are unlikely to drive ATE suppliers to invest R&D dollars in creating new purpose-built machines.

Korczynski:  For the EDA of IoT devices, can all sensors be modeled as analog inputs within established flows or do we need new modeling capability at the circuit level?

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Typically, the interface to the physical world has been partitioned at the electrical boundary. But as more mechanical and electro-mechanical sensors are more deeply integrated, there has been growing value in co-design, co-analysis, and co-optimization. We should see more multi-domain analysis over time.

Nicolas Williams, product marketing manager, Mentor Graphics

Designers of IoT devices that contain MEMS sensors need quality models in order to simulate their behavior under physical conditions such as motion and temperature. Unlike CMOS IC design, there are few standardized MEMS models for system-level simulation. State of the art MEMS modeling requires automatic generation of behavioral models based on the results of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using reduced-order modeling (ROM). ROM is a numerical methodology that reduces the analysis results to create Verilog-A models for use in AMS simulations for co-simulation of the MEMS device in the context of the IoT system.

Presto Engineering and Peraso Technologies Develop Innovative Test Solution for 60 GHz Transceiver

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

Presto Engineering Inc., a world leader in semiconductor product engineering and supply chain management, and Peraso Technologies, a leading wireless chipset manufacturer, today jointly announced their successful collaboration in developing a comprehensive test solution for Peraso’s recently-launched 60 GHz semiconductor products.

The Peraso chipset is currently in full mass production with Presto providing test services at volumes of tens of thousands of parts per month. The announced solution is the first phase of a project that will culminate in a high-efficiency test solution – 40X faster and capable of supporting high-volume production (millions of devices per month) for the consumer electronics market – planned for later this year. The 60 GHz spectrum provides the foundation for WiGig® technology, and with the increased demand for faster wireless connectivity, is quickly changing how users stream and connect to the Internet.

“Presto contributed expertise in high-frequency RF testing that was absolutely essential in our collaboration,” said Ron Glibbery, CEO of Peraso Technologies. “Together, we were able to develop an innovative solution that provides reliable testing at speeds and costs sufficient to support our infrastructure integrated circuits. We are well on our way to completing a test solution that will reduce the cost of test by another 40X and support the high growth we anticipate with the introduction of products into the consumer electronics market.”

“This collaboration with Peraso allowed us to combine our extensive experience in RF test with Peraso’s expertise in 60 GHz ICs to develop a solution for high-speed/low-cost testing where none previously existed,” said Michel Villemain, CEO of Presto Engineering. “We have already made significant progress in the next phase of the development that will offer significantly reduced test times and an overall lower cost of test. The successful collaboration demonstrates the benefits we provide to fabless manufacturers, ranging from test services to comprehensive supply chain management.”

The Peraso X610 WiGig® chipset constitutes a complete baseband to 60 GHz solution and is compliant with the single carrier modulation and coding schemes of the IEEE 802.11ad specification. Incorporating the PRS4601 WiGig® baseband IC and the PRS1126 WiGig® transceiver, the chipset provides the core functionality for a low-cost, high-performance multi-gigabit per second solution that operates across the industrial temperature range. As manufacturers continue to seek solutions to bring WiGig®-enabled devices quickly to market, Presto and Peraso remain at the forefront, driving down the cost and implementation time with this revolutionary test solution.

The testbed is comprised of a set of custom hardware components mounted on an automated test equipment (ATE) load board, and associated test programs, that together provide comprehensive automated testing of both baseband (~2 GHz) and high frequency (60 GHz) functionality.

Behind the Scenes: Presto Engineering

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016
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