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Posts Tagged ‘modeling’

High-NA EUV Lithography Investment

Monday, November 28th, 2016

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

As covered in a recent press release, leading lithography OEM ASML invested EUR 1 billion in cash to buy 24.9% of ZEISS subsidiary Carl Zeiss SMT, and committed to spend EUR ~760 million over the next 6 years on capital expenditures and R&D of an entirely new high numerical aperture (NA) extreme ultra-violet (EUV) lithography tool. Targeting NA >0.5 to be able to print 8 nm half-pitch features, the planned tool will use anamorphic mirrors to reduce shadowing effects from nanometer-scale mask patterns. Clever design and engineering of the mirrors could allow this new NA >0.5 tool to be able to achieve wafer throughputs similar to ASML’s current generation of 0.33 NA tools for the same source power and resist speed.

The Numerical Aperture (NA) of an optical system is a dimensionless number that characterizes the range of angles over which the system can accept or emit light. Higher NA systems can resolve finer features by condensing light from a wider range of angles. Mirror surfaces to reflect EUV “light” are made from over 50 atomic-scale bi-layers of molybdenum (Mo) and silicon (Si), and increasing the width of mirrors to reach higher NA increases the angular spread of the light which results in shadows within patterns.

In the proceedings of last year’s European Mask and Lithography Conference, Zeiss researchers reported on  “Anamorphic high NA optics enabling EUV lithography with sub 8 nm resolution” (doi:10.1117/12.2196393). The abstract summarizes the inherent challenges of establishing high NA EUVL technology:

For such a high-NA optics a configuration of 4x magnification, full field size of 26 x 33 mm² and 6’’ mask is not feasible anymore. The increased chief ray angle and higher NA at reticle lead to non-acceptable mask shadowing effects. These shadowing effects can only be controlled by increasing the magnification, hence reducing the system productivity or demanding larger mask sizes. We demonstrate that the best compromise in imaging, productivity and field split is a so-called anamorphic magnification and a half field of 26 x 16.5 mm² but utilizing existing 6’’ mask infrastructure.

Figure 1 shows that ASML plans to introduce such a system after the year 2020, with a throughput of 185 wafers-per-hour (wph) and with overlay of <2 nm. Hans Meiling, ASML vice president of product management EUV, in an exclusive interview with Solid State Technology explained why >0.5 NA capability will not be upgradable on 0.33 NA tools, “the >0.5NA optical path is larger and will require a new platform. The anamorphic imaging will also require stage architectural changes.”

Fig.1: EUVL stepper product plans for wafers per hour (WPH) and overlay accuracy include change from 0.33 NA to a new >0.5 NA platform. (Source: ASML)

Overlay of <2 nm will be critical when patterning 8nm half-pitch features, particularly when stitching lines together between half-fields patterned by single-exposures of EUV. Minimal overlay is also needed for EUV to be used to cut grid lines that are initially formed by pitch-splitting ArFi. In addition to the high NA set of mirrors, engineers will have to improve many parts of the stepper to be able to improve on the 3 nm overlay capability promised for the NXE:3400B 0.33 NA tool ASML plans to ship next year.

“Achieving better overlay requires improvements in wafer and reticle stages regardless of NA,” explained Meiling. “The optics are one of the many components that contribute to overlay. Compare to ArF immersion lithography, where the optics NA has been at 1.35 for several generations but platform improvements have provided significant overlay improvements.”

Manufacturing Capability Plans

Figure 2 shows that anamorphic systems require anamorphic masks, so moving from 0.33 to >0.5 NA requires re-designed masks. For relatively large chips, two adjacent exposures with two different anamorphic masks will be needed to pattern the same field area which could be imaged with lower resolution by a single 0.33 NA exposure. Obviously, such adjacent exposures of one layer must be properly “stitched” together by design, which is another constraint on electronic design automation (EDA) software.

Fig.2: Anamorphic >0.5 NA EUVL system planned by ASML and Zeiss will magnify mask images by 4x in the x-direction and 8x in the y-direction. (Source: Carl Zeiss SMT)

Though large chips will require twice as many half-field masks, use of anamorphic imaging somewhat reduces the challenges of mask-making. Meiling reminds us that, “With the anamorphic imaging, the 8X direction conditions will actually relax, while the 4X direction will require incremental improvements such as have always been required node-on-node.”

ASML and Zeiss report that ideal holes which “obscure” the centers of mirrors can surprisingly allow for increased transmission of EUV by each mirror, up to twice that of the “unobscured” mirrors in the 0.33 NA tool. The holes allow the mirrors to reflect through each-other, so they all line up and reflect better. Theoretically then each >0.5 NA half-field can be exposed twice as fast as a 0.33 NA full-field, though it seems that some system throughput loss will be inevitable. Twice the number of steps across the wafer will have to slow down throughput by some percent.

White two stitched side-by-side >0.5 NA EUVL exposures will be challenging, the generally known alternatives seem likely to provide only lower throughputs and lower yields:

*   Double-exposure of full-field using 0.33 NA EUVL,

*   Octuple-exposure of full-field using ArFi, or

*   Quadruple-exposure of full-field using ArFi complemented by e-beam direct-writing (EbDW) or by directed self-assembly (DSA).

One ASML EUVL system for HVM is expected to cost ~US$100 million. As presented at the company’s October 31st Investor Day this year, ASML’s modeling indicates that a leading-edge logic fab running ~45k wafer starts per month (WSPM) would need to purchase 7-12 EUV systems to handle an anticipated 6-10 EUV layers within “7nm-node” designs. Assuming that each tool will cost >US$100 million, a leading logic fab would have to invest ~US$1 billion to be able to use EUV for critical lithography layers.

With near US$1 billion in capital investments needed to begin using EUVL, HVM fabs want to be able to get productive value out of the tools over more than a single IC product generation. If a logic fab invests US$1 billion to use 0.33 NA EUVL for the “7nm-node” there is risk that those tools will be unproductive for “5nm-node” designs expected a few years later. Some fabs may choose to push ArFi multi-patterning complemented by another lithography technology for a few years, and delay investment in EUVL until >0.5 NA tools become available.

—E.K.

Molecular Modeling of Materials Defects for Yield Recovery

Monday, March 21st, 2016

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

New materials are being integrated into High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) of semiconductor ICs, while old materials are being extended with more stringent specifications. Defects within materials cause yield losses in HVM fabs, and engineers must identify the specific source of an observed defect before corrective steps can be taken. Honeywell Electronic Materials has been using molecular modeling software provided by Scienomics to both develop new materials and to modify old materials. Modeling allowed Honeywell to uncover the origin of subtle solvation-based film defects within Bottom Anti-Reflective Coatings (BARC) which were degrading yield in a customer’s lithographic process module.

Scienomics sponsored a Materials Modeling and Simulations online seminar on February 26th of this year, featuring Dr. Nancy Iwamoto of Honeywell discussing how Scienomics software was used to accelerate response to a customer’s manufacturing yield loss. “This was a product running at a customer line,” explained Iwamoto, “and we needed to find the solution.” The product was a Bottom Anti-Reflective Coating (BARC) organo-silicate polymer delivered in solution form and then spun on wafers to a precise thickness.

Originally observed during optical inspection by fab engineers as 1-2 micron sized vague spots in the BARC, the new defect type was difficult to see yet could be correlated to lithographic yield loss. The defects appeared to be discrete within the film instead of on the top surface, so the source was likely some manner of particle, yet filters did not capture these particles.

The filter captured some particles rich in silicon, as well as other particles rich in carbon. Sequential filtration showed that particles were passing through impossibly small pores, which suggested that the particles were built of deformable gel-like phases. The challenge was to find the material handling or processing situation, which resulted in thermodynamically possible and kinetically probable conditions that could form such gels.

Fig: Materials Processes and Simulations (MAPS) gives researchers access to visualization and analysis tools in a single user interface together with access to multiple simulation engines. (Source: Scienomics)

Molecular modeling and simulation is a powerful technique that can be used for materials design, functional upgrades, process optimization, and manufacturing. The Figure shows a dashboard for Scienomics’ modeling platform. Best practices in molecular modeling to find out-of-control parameters in HVM include a sequential workflow:

  • Build correct models based on experimental observables,
  • Simulate potential molecular structures based on known chemicals and hierarchical models,
  • Analyze manufacturing variabilities to identify excursion sources, and
  • Propose remedy for failure elimination.

Honeywell Electronic Materials researchers had very few experimental observables from which to start:  phenomenon is rare (yet effects yield), not filterable, yet from thermodynamic hydrolysis parameters it must be quasi-stable. Re-testing of product and re-examination of Outgoing Quality Control (OQC) data at the Honeywell production site showed that the molecular weight of the product was consistent with the desired distribution. There was also an observed BARC thickness increase of ~1nm on the wafer associated with the presence of these defects.

Using the modeling platform, Honeywell looked at the solubility parameters for different small molecular chains off of known-branched back-bone centers. Gel-like agglomerations could certainly be formed under the wrong conditions. Once the agglomerations form, they are not very stable so they can probably dis-aggregate when being forced through a filter and then re-aggregate on the other side.

What conditions could induce gel formation? After a few weeks of modeling, it was determined that temperature variations had the greatest influence on the agglomeration, and that variability was strongest at the ~250°K recommended for storage. Storage at 230°K resulted in measurably worse agglomeration, and any extreme in heating/cooling ramp rate tended to reduce solubility.

Molecular modeling was used in a forensic manner to find that the root cause of gel-like defects was related to thermal history:

*   Thermodynamics determined the most likely oligomers that could agglomerate,

*   Temperature-dependent solubility models determined which particles would reach wafers.

Because of the on-wafer BARC thickness increase of ~1nm, fab engineers could use all of the molecular modeling information to trace the temperature variation to bottles installed in the lithographic track tool. The fab was able to change specifications for the storage and handling of the BARC bottles to bring the process back into control.