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IoT Demands Part 2: Test and Packaging

Friday, April 15th, 2016

By Ed Korczynski, Senior Technical Editor, Solid State Technology, SemiMD

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) adds new sensing and communications to improve the functionality of all manner of things in the world. Solid-state and semiconducting materials for new integrated circuits (IC) intended for ubiquitous IoT applications will have to be extremely small and low-cost. To understand the state of technology preparedness to meet the anticipated needs of the different application spaces, experts from GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Cadence, Mentor Graphics and Presto Engineering gave detailed answers to questions about IoT chip needs in EDA and fab nodes, as published in “IoT Demands:  EDA and Fab Nodes.” We continue with the conversation below.

Korczynski: For test of IoT devices which may use ultra-low threshold voltage transistors, what changes are needed compared to logic test of a typical “low-power” chip?

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Susceptibility to process corners and operating conditions becomes heightened at near-threshold voltage levels. This translates into either more conservative design sign-off criteria, or the need for higher levels of manufacturing screening/tests. Either way, it has an impact on cost, be it hidden by over-design, or overtly through more costly qualification and test processes.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

We need to make sure that the testability has also been designed to be functional structurally in this mode. In addition, sub-threshold voltage operation must account for non-linear transistor characteristics and the strong impact of local process variation, for which the conventional testability arsenal is still very poor. Automotive screening used low voltage operation (VLV) to detect latent defects, but at very low voltage close to the transistor threshold, digital becomes analog, and therefore if the usual concept still works for defect detection, functional test and @speed tests require additional expertise to be both meaningful and efficient from a test coverage perspective.

Korczynski:  Do we have sufficient specifications within “5G” to handle IoT device interoperability for all market segments?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

The estimated timeline for standardization availability of 5G is around 2020. 5G is being designed keeping three classes of applications in mind:  Enhanced Mobile Broadband, Massive IoT, and Mission-Critical Control. Specifically for IoT, the focus is on efficient, low-cost communication with deep coverage. We will start to see early 5G technologies start to appear around 2018, and device connectivity,

interoperability and marshaling the data they generate that can apply to multiple IoT sub-segments and markets is still very much in development.

Korczynski:  Will the 1st-generation of IoT devices likely include wide varieties of solution for different market-segments such as industrial vs. retail vs. consumer, or will most device use similar form-factors and underlying technologies?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

If we use CES 2016 as a showcase, we are seeing IoT “Things” that are becoming use-case or application-centric as they apply to specific sub-segments such as Connected Home, Automotive, Medical, Security, etc. There is definitely more variety on the consumer front vs. industrial. Vendors / OEMs / System houses are differentiating at the user-interface design and form-factor levels while the “under-the-hood” IC capabilities and component technologies that provide the atomic intelligence are fairly common. ​

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Right now it seems like everyone is swinging for the fence. Everyone wants the home-run product that will reach a billion devices sold. Generality generally leads to sub-optimality, so a single device usually fails to meet the needs and expectations of many. Devices that are optimized for more specific use cases and elements of purchasing criteria will win out. The question of interface is an interesting one.

Korczynski:  Will there be different product life-cycles for different IoT market-segments, such as 1-3 years for consumer but 5-10 years for industrial?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

That certainly seems to be the case. According to Gartner’s market analysis for IoT, Consumer is expected to grow at a faster pace in terms of units compared to Enterprise, while Enterprise is expected to lead in revenue. Also the churn-cycle in Consumer is higher / faster compared to Enterprise. Today’s wearables or smart-phones are good reference examples. This will however vary by the type of “Thing” and sub-segment. For example, you expect to have your smart refrigerator for a longer time period compared to smart clothing or eyewear. As ASPs of the “Things”come down over time and new classes of products such as disposables hit the market, we can expect even larger volumes.​

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

The market segments continue to be driven by the same use cases. In consumer wearables, short cycles are linked to fashion trends and rapid obsolescence, where consumer home use has longer cycles closer to industrial market requirements. We believe that the lifecycle norms will hold true for IoT devices.

Korczynski:  For the IoT application of infrastructure monitoring (e.g. bridges, pipelines, etc.) long-term (10-20 year) reliability will be essential, while consumer applications may be best served by 3-5 year reliability devices which cost less; how well can we quantify the trade-off between cost and chip reliability?

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Conceptually we know very well how to make devices more reliable. We can lower current densities with bigger wires, we can run at cooler temperatures, and so on.  The difficulty is always in finding optimality for a given criterion across the, for practical purposes, infinite tradeoffs to be made.

Korczynski:  Why is the talk of IoT not just another “Dot Com” hype cycle?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

​​I participated in a panel at SEMICON China in Shanghai last month that discussed a similar question. If we think of IoT as a “brand new thing” (no pun intended), then we can think of it as hype. However if we look at the IoT as as set of use-cases that can take advantage of an evolution of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) going towards broader connectivity, huge amounts of data generated and exchanged, and a generational increase in internet and communication network bandwidths (i.e. 5G), then it seems a more down-to-earth technological progression.

Nicolas Williams, product marketing manager, Mentor Graphics

Unlike the Dot Com hype, which was built upon hope and dreams of future solutions that may or may not have been based in reality, IoT is real business. For example, in a 2016 IC Insights report, we see that last year $63.4 billion in revenue was generated for IoT systems and the market is growing at about 20% CAGR. This same report also shows IoT semiconductor sales of over $15 billion in 2015 with a CAGR of 21.1%.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

It is the investment needed up front to create sensing agents and an infrastructure for the hardware foundation of the IoT that will lead to big data and ultimately value creation.

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

There will be plenty of hype cycles for products and product categories along the way. However, the foundational shift of the connection of things is a diode through which civilization will only pass through in one direction.

IoT Demands Part 1: EDA and Fab Nodes

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is expected to add new sensing and communications to improve the functionality of all manner of things in the world:  bridges sensing and reporting when repairs are needed, parts automatically informing where they are in storage and transport, human health monitoring, etc. Solid-state and semiconducting materials for new integrated circuits (IC) intended for ubiquitous IoT applications will have to be assembled at low-cost and small-size in High Volume Manufacturing (HVM). Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and other sensors are being combined with Radio-Frequency (RF) ICs in miniaturized packages for the first wave of growth in major sub-markets.

To meet the anticipated needs of the different IoT application spaces, SemiMD asked leading companies within critical industry segments about the state of technology preparedness:

*  Commercial IC HVM – GLOBALFOUNDRIES,

*  Electronic Design Automation (EDA) – Cadence and Mentor Graphics,

*  IC and complex system test – Presto Engineering.

Korczynski:  Today, ICs for IoT applications typically use 45nm/65nm-node which are “Node -3″ (N-3) compared to sub-20nm-node chips in HVM. Five years from now, when the bleeding-edge will use 10nm node technology, will IoT chips still use N-3 of 28nm-node (considered a “long-lived node”) or will 45nm-node remain the likely sweet-spot of price:performance?

Timothy Dry, product marketing manager, GLOBALFOUNDRIES

In 5 years time, there will be a spread of technology solutions addressing low, middle, and high ends of IoT applications. At the low end, IoT end nodes for applications like connected smoke

detectors, security sensors will be at 55, 40nm ULP and ULL for lowest system power, and low cost. These applications will be typically served by MCUs <50DMIPs. Integrated radios (BLE, 802.15.4), security, Power Management Unit (PMU), and eFlash or MRAM will be common features. Connected LED lighting is forecasted to be a high volume IoT application. The LED drivers will use BCD extensions of 130nm—40nm—that can also support the radio and protocol-MCU with Flash.

In the mid-range, applications like smart-meters and fitness/medical monitoring will need systems that have more processing power <300DMIPS. These products will be implemented in 40nm, 28nm and GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ new 22nm FDSOI technology that uses software-controlled body-biasing to tune SoC operation for lowest dynamic power. Multiple wireless (BLE/802.15.4, WiFi, LPWAN) and wired connectivity (Ethernet, PLC) protocols with security will be integrated for gateway products.

High-end products like smart-watches, learning thermostats, home security/monitoring cameras, and drones will require MPU-class IC products (~2000DMIPs) and run high-order operating systems (e.g. Linux, Android). These products will be made in leading-edge nodes starting at 22FDX, 14FF and migrating to 7FF and beyond. Design for lowest dynamic power for longest battery life will be the key driver, and these products typically require human machine Interface (HMI) with animated graphics on a high resolution displays. Connectivity will include BLE, WiFi and cellular with strong security.

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

We have seen recent announcements of IoT targeted devices at 14nm. The value created by Moore’s Law integration should hold, and with that, there will be inherent advantages to those who leverage next generation process nodes. Still, other product categories may reach functionality saturation points where there is simply no more value obtained by adding more capability. We anticipate that there will be more “live” process nodes than ever in history.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

It is fair to say that most IoT devices will be a heterogeneous aggregation of analog functions rather than high power digital processors. Therefore, and by similarity with Bluetooth and RFID devices, 90nm and 65nm will remain the mainstream nodes for many sub-vertical markets, enabling the integration of RF and analog front-end functions with digital gate density. By default, sensors will stay out of the monolithic path for both design and cost reasons. The best answer would be that the IoT ASIC will follow eventually the same scaling as the MCU products, with embedded non-volatile memories, which today is 55-40nm centric and will move to 28nm with industry maturity and volumes.

Korczynski:  If most IoT devices will include some manner of sensor which must be integrated with CMOS logic and memory, then do we need new capabilities in EDA-flows and burn-in/test protocols to ensure meeting time-to-market goals?

Nicolas Williams, product marketing manager, Mentor Graphics

If we define a typical IoT device as a product that contains a MEMS sensor, A/D, digital processing, and a RF-connection to the internet, we can see that the fundamental challenge of IoT design is that teams working on this product need to master the analog, digital, MEMS, and RF domains. Often, these four domains require different experience and knowledge and sometimes design in these domains is accomplished by separate teams. IoT design requires that all four domains are designed and work together, especially if they are going on the same die. Even if the components are targeting separate dice that will be bonded together, they still need to work together during the layout and verification process. Therefore, a unified design flow is required.

Stephen Pateras, product marketing director, Mentor Graphics

Being able to quickly debug and create test patterns for various embedded sensor IP can be addressed with the adoption of the new IEEE 1687 IP plug-and-play standard. If a sensor IP block’s digital interface adheres to the standard, then any vendor-provided data required to initialize or operate the embedded sensor can be easily and quickly mapped to chip pins. Data sequences for multiple sensor IP blocks can also be merged to create optimized sequences that will minimize debug and test times.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

From a testing standpoint, widely used ATEs are generally focused on a few purposes, but don’t necessarily cover all elements in a system. We think that IoT devices are likely to require complex testing flows using multiple ATEs to assure adequate coverage. This is likely to prevail for some time as short run volumes characteristic of IoT demands are unlikely to drive ATE suppliers to invest R&D dollars in creating new purpose-built machines.

Korczynski:  For the EDA of IoT devices, can all sensors be modeled as analog inputs within established flows or do we need new modeling capability at the circuit level?

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Typically, the interface to the physical world has been partitioned at the electrical boundary. But as more mechanical and electro-mechanical sensors are more deeply integrated, there has been growing value in co-design, co-analysis, and co-optimization. We should see more multi-domain analysis over time.

Nicolas Williams, product marketing manager, Mentor Graphics

Designers of IoT devices that contain MEMS sensors need quality models in order to simulate their behavior under physical conditions such as motion and temperature. Unlike CMOS IC design, there are few standardized MEMS models for system-level simulation. State of the art MEMS modeling requires automatic generation of behavioral models based on the results of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using reduced-order modeling (ROM). ROM is a numerical methodology that reduces the analysis results to create Verilog-A models for use in AMS simulations for co-simulation of the MEMS device in the context of the IoT system.

What’s the Next-Gen Litho Tech? Maybe All of Them

Thursday, February 25th, 2016

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

The annual SPIE Advanced Lithography symposium in San Jose, Calif., hasn’t offered a clear winner in the next-generation lithography race. It’s becoming clearer, however, that 193i immersion and extreme-ultraviolet lithography will co-exist in the future, while directed self-assembly, nanoimprint lithography, and maybe even electron-beam direct-write technology will fit into the picture, too.

At the same time, plasma deposition and etching processes are assuming a greater interdependence with 193i, especially when it comes to multiple patterning, such as self-aligned double patterning, self-aligned quadruple patterning, and self-aligned octuple patterning (yes, there is such a thing!).

“We’ve got to go down to the sub-nanometer level,” Richard Gottscho, Lam Research’s executive vice president of global products, said Monday morning in his plenary presentation at the conference. “We must reduce the variability in multiple patterning,” he added.

Gottscho touted the benefits of atomic level processing in continuing to shrink IC dimensions. Atomic level deposition has been in volume production for a decade or more, he noted, and atomic level etching is emerging as an increasingly useful technology.

When it comes to EUV, “it’s a matter of when, not if,” the Lam executive commented. “EUV will be complementary with 193i.”

Anthony Yen, director of nanopatterning technology in the Infrastructure Division of Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, followed Gottscho in the plenary session. “The fat lady hasn’t sung yet, but she’s on the stage,” he said of EUV.

Harry Levinson, senior director of GlobalFoundries, gave the opening plenary presentation, with the topic of “Evolution in the Concentration of Activities in Lithography.” He was asked after his presentation, “When is the end?” Levinson replied, “We’re definitely not going to get sub-atomic.”

With that limit in mind, dozens of papers were presented this week on what may happen before the semiconductor industry hits the sub-atomic wall.

There were seven conferences within the symposium, on specific subjects, along with a day of classes, an interactive poster session, and a two-day exhibition.

The Alternative Lithographic Technologies conference was heavy on directed self-assembly and nanoimprint lithography papers, while also offering glimpses at patterning with tilted ion implantation and multiphoton laser ablation lithography.

“Patterning is the battleground,” said David Fried, Coventor’s chief technology officer, semiconductor, in an interview at the SPIE conference. He described directed self-assembly as “an enabler for optical lithography.”

Mattan Kamon of Coventor presented a paper on Wednesday afternoon on “Virtual fabrication using directed self-assembly for process optimization in a 14nm DRAM node.”

DSA could be used in conjunction with SAQP or LELELELE, according to Fried. While some lithography experts remain leery or skeptical about using DSA in high-volume manufacturing, the Coventor CTO is a proponent of the technology’s potential.

“Unit process models in DSA are not far-fetched,” he said. “I think they’re pretty close.  The challenges of EUV are well understood. DSA challenges are a little less clear. There’s no ‘one solution fits all’ with DSA.” Fried added, “There are places where DSA can still win.”

Franklin Kalk, executive vice president of technology for Toppan Photomasks, is open to the idea of DSA and imprint lithography joining EUV and immersion in the lithography mix. “It will be some combination,” he said in an interview, while adding, “It’s a dog’s breakfast of technologies. Don’t ever count anything out.”

Richard Wise, Lam’s technical managing director in the company’s Patterning, Global Products Groups CTO Office, said EUV, when ready, will likely be complementary with multipatterning for 7 nanometer.

Self-aligning quadruple patterning, for example, was once considered “insanity” in the industry, yet it is a proven production technology now, he said.

While EUV technology is “very focused on one company,” ASML Holding, there is a consensus at SPIE that EUV’s moment is at hand, Wise said. Intel’s endorsement of the technology and dedication to advancing it speaks volumes of EUV’s potential, he asserted.

“Lam’s always excelled in lot-to-lot control,” an area of significant concern, Wise said, especially with all of this week’s talk about process variability.

What will be the final verdict on the future of lithography technology? Stay tuned.

Optimism Reigns at SPIE Lithography Conference, Despite Challenges

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016

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By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

Semiconductor manufacturing and design is growing increasingly complicated and just plain hard. Everyone knows that. The bad news is it’s only going to get worse.

Relax, there are many smart people gathered in San Jose, Calif., this week for the SPIE Advanced Lithography Symposium to discuss the challenges and figure out how to surmount them.

The changes required in lithography and related technologies to continue IC scaling promise to be painful and costly. Mitigating the pain and the cost is a common theme at the SPIE conference.

The annual SPIE Advanced Lithography conference is often dominated by discussions on the state of extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). In presentations on Sunday and Monday, the theme was generally the same as 2015 – EUV is making progress, yet it’s still not ready for high-volume semiconductor manufacturing.

Intel Fellow Mark Phillips said the technology has seen “two years of solid progress,” speaking Sunday at Nikon’s LithoVision 2016 event. He added, “There’s no change in Intel’s position: We’ll use EUV only when it’s ready.”

Anthony Yen of Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing covered the 30-year history of EUV development in his Monday morning presentation at the SPIE conference. Asked during the question-and-answer session following the presentation on when the world’s largest silicon foundry will use EUV, Yen stuck to the official company line of implementing EUV in production for the 7-nanometer process node, after some involvement at 10nm.

Seong-Sam Kim of Samsung Electronics also sees EUV realizing its long-aborning potential at 7nm, a node at which “argon fluoride multipatterning will hit the wall.” He touted the 80-watt power source Samsung has achieved with its NXE-3300 scanner from ASML Holding, saying it had maintained that level over more than eight months.

Intel’s Britt Turkot reported 200W source power “has been achieved recently,” and said the tin droplet generator in its ASML scanner has been significantly improved, increasing its typical lifetime by three times. EUV has demonstrated “solid progress,” she said, including ASML’s development of a membrane pellicle for EUV reticles.

While work with the ASML scanner on Intel’s 14nm pilot fab line has been “encouraging,” Turkot said, she added, “We do need to keep the momentum going.” Intel sees EUV entering into volume production with 7nm chips, according to Turkot. “It will be used when it’s ready,” she said.

EUV technology has shown “good progress” in productivity, while its availability and cost considerations have “a long way to go,” Turkot concluded, adding, “We need an actinic solution for the long term.”

An industry consensus has emerged that EUV will be used with ArF 193i immersion lithography in the near future, and this trend is likely to continue for some time, according to executives at the SPIE conference. There may also be wider adoption of directed self-assembly (DSA) and nanoimprint lithography technology, among other alternative lithography technologies.

Mark Phillips of Intel pointed to complementary implementation of EUV and 193i. “We must use EUV carefully,” he said. “We need to replace three-plus 193i masks.” Phillips added, “EUV can’t be applied everywhere affordably. 193i will continue to be used whenever possible.”

Nikon executives touted the capabilities of their new NSR-S631E ArF immersion scanner, introduced just before the SPIE conference. The new scanner can turn out 250 wafers per hour, and can be pushed to 270 wph with certain options, according to Nikon’s Ryoichi Kawaguchi.

Yuichi Shibazaki of Nikon said the company will next year introduce the S63xE scanner, improving on S631E.

For all the challenges of transitioning to 7nm and beyond, executives at SPIE remain optimistic about solving the issues of 193i multipatterning, DSA, and EUV. Harry Levinson of GlobalFoundries said in response to a question, “The ultimate resource is the human mind.”

Cadence Debuts Product for Reducing Test Time, Costs

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

Cadence Design Systems is introducing the Modus Test Solution, a product that it touts as capable of reducing IC testing time and test costs, while improving profit margins for chips.

Modus shares a Tcl scripting and debugging environment with Cadence’s Genus Synthesis Solution, Innovus Implementation Solution, and Tempus Timing Signoff Solution, according to the company.

Its other capabilities include 2D compression, elastic compression, and embedded memory bus support. Modus incorporates automatic test pattern generation, built-in self-test, and design-for-test technologies.

“We’re pretty excited about it,” Paul Cunningham, vice president of research and development at Cadence, says of Modus. The automatic test equipment market is worth about $4 billion a year, yet test technology hasn’t yielded any significant breakthroughs in the 21st century, he asserts.

“Test has been stagnant for the last 15 to 20 years,” he says.

Cadence is trying to work around the challenges of test time and test costs by addressing “actual physical test” and “test logic itself,” Cunningham notes. Just as chip designers are constantly aware of power/performance/area in their projects, Cadence addressed test coverage and chip size in developing Modus, he adds.

ATPG, BIST, and DFT technologies have been around for a long time, and they are regaining substantial interest in the semiconductor industry as system-on-a-chip device designs grow more complex.

“Chip CAGRs are not what they used to be,” Cunningham observes. “Cost and profit are very, very critical. Power/performance/area are really, really critical.”

Chipmakers are constantly looking to “squeeze profit margins out,” and reducing test costs can contribute to that imperative, the Cadence executive says. “There is “real pressure on margins, real pressure on complexity,” he adds.

Cunningham also focuses on the “concept of a single user interface” for Modus and its related design tools. With a common UI, different steps in the chip design, manufacturing, and testing processes can be like “different apps on an iPhone,” he says.

Cadence collected testimonials for Modus from three chip companies.

“Minimizing the cost of test is crucial in high-volume, price-sensitive markets like embedded processing. The Modus Test Solution is showing a 1.7x reduction in digital test time on one of our largest and most complex embedded processor chips without any impact on design closure,” said Roger Peters of Texas Instruments, who is involved in microcontroller silicon development.

Sue Bentlage, director of ASIC design and methodology at GlobalFoundries, said, “The Modus Test Solution demonstrated a 3.6x reduction in test time on a customer networking chip without impacting design routability or fault coverage. This technology definitely reduces production test costs. The evolution of the Modus Test Solution, as well as the Innovus Implementation System, the Tempus Timing Signoff Solution and the Voltus IC Power Integrity Solution, provides a leading edge end-to-end design flow in 14nm and beyond for our worldwide design centers and for our ASIC customers.”

Chris Malkin, baseband IC manager at Sequans Communications, said of Modus, “Test time has a significant impact on semiconductor product costs and production capacity, so reducing test time is important. We have seen the Modus Test Solution achieve a 2x reduction in test time without impacting fault coverage or die size.”

“With the Modus Test Solution, we achieved an impressive 2.6X reduction in compression wirelength and a 2X reduction in scan time. The reduction in compression logic wirelength enabled us to address a key challenge for design closure as we push to smaller process nodes and scale design size,” said Alan Nakamoto, vice president, engineering services at Microsemi Corp.

InvenSense Developers Conference Tackles Sensor Security, New Technologies

Monday, November 23rd, 2015

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

The second day of the InvenSense Developers Conference saw presenters get down to cases – use cases for sensors.

There were track sessions devoted to mobile technology and the Internet of Things, with the latter featuring presentations on industrial and automotive applications, smart homes and drones, smartphones and tablet computers, and wearable electronics. InvenSense partner companies had their own track on New Technologies, fitting into the conference’s “Internet of Sensors” theme.

The conference also featured two developer tracks in parallel, providing five InvenSense presentations on its FireFly hardware and software, SensorStudio, and other offerings.

One of the presentations that wrapped up the conference on Wednesday afternoon (November 18) was given by Pim Tuyls, chief executive officer of Intrinsic-ID, the Dutch company that worked with InvenSense to develop the TrustedSensor product, a secure sensor-based authentication system incorporating the FireFly system-on-a-chip device.

TrustedSensor will be shipped to alpha customers in the first quarter of 2016 and will go out to beta customers in the second quarter of next year, according to Tuyls. “This is real,” he said.

The Intrinsic-ID founder briefly reviewed the company’s history, to start. It was spun out of Royal Philips in 2008 and is an independent company with venture-capital funding, Tuyls noted.

Intrinsic-ID was founded to provide “cyber physical security based on physically unclonable function,” or PUF, Tuyls said. “We invented PUF,” he added. “It has been vetted by security labs and government agencies,” among other parties.

Taking “The Trusted Sensor” as his theme, the Intrinsic-ID CEO said, “Sensors are the first line of defense. You want to make sure you can provide a certain level of security.”

It is critical to achieve “the right balance” in designing, fabricating, and installing sensors, with security, flexibility, and low footprint among the key considerations, according to Tuyls.

While whimsically describing PUF as “a magic concept,” Tuyls noted, “Chips are physically unique,” with no two completely alike due to manufacturing processes.

PUF can “extract a crypto key from any device,” he added. “You can authenticate any device.”

Intrinsic-ID has tested the PUF technology with a wide variety of silicon foundries, Tuyls said – namely, Cypress Semiconductor, GlobalFoundries, IBM, Intel, Renesas Electronics, Samsung Electronics, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, and United Microelectronics. It has been implemented by Altera, Microsemi, NXP Semiconductors, Samsung, and Synopsys, he added, and process nodes ranging from 180 nanometers down to 14nm have been tested.

Tuyls concluded by emphasizing the importance of sensor security for the Internet of Things. “We should not wait; we should not try to save a few cents,” he said. “It is important, but it is hard.”

Earlier in the day, attendees heard from Sam Massih, InvenSense’s director of wearable sensors. “There’s a wearable solution for every part of the body,” he commented.

“Step count isn’t enough,” Massih said. “You need context for data.” He cited the example of a user who goes to the gym three times a week and spends an hour on the elliptical trainer machine for one hour on each visit.

“That’s data that can be monetized,” he said.

InvenSense announced last month that it would enter the market for automotive sensors. Amir Panush, the company’s head of automotive and IoT industrial, said in his presentation, “Sensors need to be smart enough.”

The megatrends in automotive electronics include the use of motion sensors for safety in advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS), the smart connected car, and tough emission restrictions, according to Panush.

“We have signed a deal with a Tier One partner,” Panush said, meaning a leading automotive manufacturer, without identifying the company. “We are ramping up internal R&D in automotive.” InvenSense is presently opening design centers focusing on the $5 trillion automotive market, he added.

InvenSense was founded in 2003 and went public in 2011. The company posted revenue of $372 million in fiscal 2015 with a net loss of $1.08 million (primarily due to charging $10.55 million in interest expense against net income), after being profitable for the previous four years. InvenSense gets more than three-quarters of its revenue from mobile sensors and has a growing business in IoT sensors.

Customers in Asia accounted for 63 percent of the company’s fiscal 2015 revenue, according to InvenSense’s 10-K annual report. The company spent $90.6 million on research and development, representing about 24 percent of its net revenue.

GlobalFoundries and TSMC make nearly all of InvenSense’s wafers. Assembly packaging of its microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices and sensors is outsourced to Advanced Semiconductor Engineering, Amkor Technology, Lingsen Precision Industries, and Siliconware Precision Industries.

The company had 644 employees as of March 29, 2015, with nearly half of them involved in R&D.

STMicroelectronics is InvenSense’s primary competitor for consumer motion sensors, the 10-K states, while the company also competes with Analog Devices, Epson Toyocom, Kionix, Knowles, Maxim Integrated Products, MEMSIC, Murata Manufacturing, Panasonic, Robert Bosch, and Sony.

Managing Dis-Aggregated Data for SiP Yield Ramp

Monday, August 24th, 2015

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

In general, there is an accelerating trend toward System-in-Package (SiP) chip designs including Package-On-Package (POP) and 3D/2.5D-stacks where complex mechanical forces—primarily driven by the many Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) mismatches within and between chips and packages—influence the electrical properties of ICs. In this era, the industry needs to be able to model and control the mechanical and thermal properties of the combined chip-package, and so we need ways to feed data back and forth between designers, chip fabs, and Out-Sourced Assembly and Test (OSAT) companies. With accelerated yield ramps needed for High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) of consumer mobile products, to minimize risk of expensive Work In Progress (WIP) moving through the supply chain a lot of data needs to feed-forward and feedback.

Calvin Cheung, ASE Group Vice President of Business Development & Engineering, discussed these trends in the “Scaling the Walls of Sub-14nm Manufacturing” keynote panel discussion during the recent SEMICON West 2015. “In the old days it used to take 12-18 months to ramp yield, but the product lifetime for mobile chips today can be only 9 months,” reminded Cheung. “In the old days we used to talk about ramping a few thousand chips, while today working with Qualcomm they want to ramp millions of chips quickly. From an OSAT point of view, we pride ourselves on being a virtual arm of the manufacturers and designers,” said Cheung, “but as technology gets more complex and ‘knowledge-base-centric” we see less release of information from foundries. We used to have larger teams in foundries.” Dick James of ChipWorks details the complexity of the SiP used in the Apple Watch in his recent blog post at SemiMD, and documents the details behind the assumption that ASE is the OSAT.

With single-chip System-on-Chip (SoC) designs the ‘final test’ can be at the wafer-level, but with SiP based on chips from multiple vendors the ‘final test’ now must happen at the package-level, and this changes the Design For Test (DFT) work flows. DRAM in a 3D stack (Figure 1) will have an interconnect test and memory Built-In Self-Test (BIST) applied from BIST resident on the logic die connected to the memory stack using Through-Silicon Vias (TSV).

Fig.1: Schematic cross-sections of different 3D System-in-Package (SiP) design types. (Source: Mentor Graphics)

“The test of dice in a package can mostly be just re-used die-level tests based on hierarchical pattern re-targeting which is used in many very large designs today,” said Ron Press, technical marketing director of Silicon Test Solutions, Mentor Graphics, in discussion with SemiMD. “Additional interconnect tests between die would be added using boundary scans at die inputs and outputs, or an equivalent method. We put together 2.5D and 3D methodologies that are in some of the foundry reference flows. It still isn’t certain if specialized tests will be required to monitor for TSV partial failures.”

“Many fabless semiconductor companies today use solutions like scan test diagnosis to identify product-specific yield problems, and these solutions require a combination of test fail data and design data,” explained Geir Edie, Mentor Graphics’ product marketing manager of Silicon Test Solutions. “Getting data from one part of the fabless organization to another can often be more challenging than what one should expect. So, what’s often needed is a set of ‘best practices’ that covers the entire yield learning flow across organizations.”

“We do need a standard for structuring and transmitting test and operations meta-data in a timely fashion between companies in this relatively new dis-aggregated semiconductor world across Fabless, Foundry, OSAT, and OEM,” asserted John Carulli, GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ deputy director of Test Development & Diagnosis, in an exclusive discussion with SemiMD. “Presently the databases are still proprietary – either internal to the company or as part of third-party vendors’ applications.” Most of the test-related vendors and users are supporting development of the new Rich Interactive Test Database (RITdb) data format to replace the Standard Test Data Format (STDF) originally developed by Teradyne.

“The collaboration across the semiconductor ecosystem placed features in RITdb that understand the end-to-end data needs including security/provenance,” explained Carulli. Figure 2 shows that since RITdb is a structured data construct, any data from anywhere in the supply chain could be easily communicated, supported, and scaled regardless of OSAT or Fabless customer test program infrastructure. “If RITdb is truly adopted and some certification system can be placed around it to keep it from diverging, then it provides a standard core to transmit data with known meaning across our dis-aggregated semiconductor world. Another key part is the Test Cell Communication Standard Working Group; when integrated with RITdb, the improved automation and control path would greatly reduce manually communicated understanding of operational practices/issues across companies that impact yield and quality.”

Fig.2: Structure of the Rich Interactive Test Database (RITdb) industry standard, showing how data can move through the supply chain. (Source: Texas Instruments)

Phil Nigh, GLOBALFOUNDRIES Senior Technical Staff, explained to SemiMD that for heterogeneous integration of different chip types the industry has on-chip temperature measurement circuits which can monitor temperature at a given time, but not necessarily identify issues cause by thermal/mechanical stresses. “During production testing, we should detect mechanical/thermal stress ‘failures’ using product testing methods such as IO leakage, chip leakage, and other chip performance measurements such as FMAX,” reminded Nigh.

Model but verify

Metrology tool supplier Nanometrics has unique perspective on the data needs of 3D packages since the company has delivered dozens of tools for TSV metrology to the world. The company’s UniFire 7900 Wafer-Scale Packaging (WSP) Metrology System uses white-light interferometry to measure critical dimensions (CD), overlay, and film thicknesses of TSV, micro-bumps, Re-Distribution Layer (RDL) structures, as well as the co-planarity of Cu bumps/pillars. Robert Fiordalice, Nanometrics’ Vice President of UniFire business group, mentioned to SemiMD in an exclusive interview that new TSV structures certainly bring about new yield loss mechanisms, even if electrical tests show standard results such as ‘partial open.’ Fiordalice said that, “we’ve had a lot of pull to take our TSV metrology tool, and develop a TSV inspection tool to check every via on every wafer.” TSV inspection tools are now in beta-tests at customers.

As reported at 3Dincites, Mentor Graphics showed results at DAC2015 of the use of Calibre 3DSTACK by an OSAT to create a rule file for their Fan-Out Wafer-Level Package (FOWLP) process. This rule file can be used by any designer targeting this package technology at this assembly house, and checks the manufacturing constraints of the package RDL and the connectivity through the package from die-to-die and die-to-BGA. Based on package information including die order, x/y position, rotation and orientation, Calibre 3DSTACK performs checks on the interface geometries between chips connected using bumps, pillars, and TSVs. An assembly design kit provides a standardized process both chip design companies and assembly houses can use to ensure the manufacturability and performance of 3D SiP.

—E.K.

Solid State Watch: July 3-9, 2015

Friday, July 10th, 2015
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3DIC Technology Drivers and Roadmaps

Monday, June 22nd, 2015

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

After 15 years of targeted R&D, through-silicon via (TSV) formation technology has been established for various applications. Figure 1 shows that there are now detailed roadmaps for different types of 3-dimensional (3D) ICs well established in industry—first-order segmentation based on the wiring-level/partitioning—with all of the unit-processes and integration needed for reliable functionality shown. Using block-to-block integration with 5 micron lines at leading international IC foundries such as GlobalFoundries, systems stacking logic and memory such as the Hybrid Memory Cube (HMC) are now in production.

Fig. 1: Today’s 3D technology landscape segmented by wiring-level, showing cross-sections of typical 2-tier circuit stacks, and indicating planned reductions in contact pitches. (Source: imec)

“There are interposers for high-end complex SOC design with good yield,” informed Eric Beyne, Scientific Director Advanced Packaging & Interconnect for imec in an exclusive interview with Solid State Technology. ““For a systems company, once you’ve made the decision to go 3D there’s no way back,” said Beyne. “If you need high-bandwidth memory, for example, then you’re committed to some sort of 3D. The process is happening today.” Beyne is scheduled to talk about 3D technology driven by 3D application requirements in the imec Technology Forum to be held July 13 in San Francisco.

Adaptation of TSV for stacking of components into a complete functional system is key to high-volume demand. Phil Garrou, packaging technologist and SemiMD blogger, reported from the recent ConFab that Hynix is readying a second generation of high-bandwidth memory (HBM 2) for use in high performance computing (HPC) such as graphics, with products already announced like Pascal from Nvidia and Greenland from AMD.

For a normalized 1 cm2 of silicon area, wide-IO memory needs 1600 signal pins (not counting additional power and ground pins) so several thousand TSV are needed for high-performance stacked DRAM today, while in more advanced memory architectures it could go up by another factor of 10. For wide-IO HVM-2 (or Wide-IO2) the silicon consumed by IO circuitry is maybe 6 cm2 today, such that a 3D stack with shorter vertical connections would eliminate many of the drivers on the chip and would allow scaling of the micro-bumps to perhaps save a total of 4 cm2 in silicon area. 3D stacks provide such trade-offs between design and performance, so the best results are predicted for 3DICs where the partitioning can be re-done at the gate or transistor level. For example, a modern 8-core microprocessor could have over 50% of the silicon area consumed by L3-cache-memory and IO circuitry, and moving from 2D to 3D would reduce total wire-lengths and interconnect power consumptions by >50%.

There are inherent thresholds based on the High:Width ratio (H:W) that determine costs and challenges in process integration of TSV:

-    10:1 ratio is the limit for the use of relatively inexpensive physical vapor deposition (PVD) for the Cu barrier/seed (B/S),

-    20:1 ratio is the limit for the use of atomic-layer deposition (ALD) for B/S and electroless deposition (ELD) for Cu fill with 1.5 x 30 micron vias on the roadmap for the far future,

-    30:1 ratio and greater is unproven as manufacturable, though novel deposition technologies continue to be explored.

TSV Processing Results

The researchers at imec have evaluated different ways of connecting TSV to underlying silicon, and have determined that direct connections to micro-bumps are inherently superior to use of any re-distribution layer (RDL) metal. Consequently, there is renewed effort on scaling of micro-bump pitches to be able to match up with TSV. The standard minimum micro-bump pitch today of 40 micron has been shrunk to 20, and imec is now working on 10 micron with plans to go to 5 micron. While it may not help with TSV connections, an RDL layer may still be needed in the final stack and the Cu metal over-burden from TSV filling has been shown by imec to be sufficiently reproducible to be used as the RDL metal. The silicon surface area covered by TSV today is a few percents not 10s of percents, since the wiring level is global or semi-global.

Regarding the trade-offs between die-to-wafer (D2W) and wafer-to-wafer (W2W) stacking, D2W seems advantageous for most near-term solutions because of easier design and superior yield. D2W design is easier because the top die can be arbitrarily smaller silicon, instead of the identically sized chips needed in W2W stacks. Assuming the same defectivity levels in stacking, D2W yield will almost always be superior to W2W because of the ability to use strictly known-good-die. Still, there are high-density integration concepts out on the horizon that call for W2W stacking. Monolithic 3D (M3D) integration using re-grown active silicon instead of TSV may still be used in the future, but design and yield issues will be at least comparable to those of W2W stacking.

Beyne mentioned that during the recent ECTC 2015, EV Group showed impressive 250nm overlay accuracy on 450mm wafers, proving that W2W alignment at the next wafer size will be sufficient for 3D stacking. Beyne is also excited by the fact the at this year’s ECTC there was, “strong interest in thermo-compression bonding, with 18 papers from leading companies. It’s something that we’ve been working on for many years for die-to-wafer stacking, while people had mistakenly thought that it might be too slow or too expensive.”

Thermal issues for high-performance circuitry remain a potential issue for 3D stacking, particularly when working with finFETs. In 2D transistors the excellent thermal conductivity of the underlying silicon crystal acts like a built-in heat-sink to diffuse heat away from active regions. However, when 3D finFETs protrude from the silicon surface the main path for thermal dissipation is through the metal lines of the local interconnect stack, and so finFETs in general and stacks of finFETs in particular tend to induce more electro-migration (EM) failures in copper interconnects compared to 2D devices built on bulk silicon.

3D Designs and Cost Modeling

At a recent North California Chapter of the American Vacuum Society (NCCAVS) PAG-CMPUG-TFUG Joint Users Group Meeting discussing 3D chip technology held at Semi Global Headquarters in San Jose, Jun-Ho Choy of Mentor Graphics Corp. presented on “Electromigration Simulation Flow For Chip-Scale Parametric Failure Analysis.” Figure 2 shows the results from use of a physics-based model for temperature- and residual-stress-aware void nucleation and growth. Mentor has identified new failure mechanisms in TSV that are based on coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stresses. Large stresses can develop in lines near TSV during subsequent thermal processing, and the stress levels are layout dependent. In the worst cases the combined total stress can exceed the critical level required for void nucleation before any electrical stressing is applied. During electrical stress, EM voids were observed to initially nucleate under the TSV centers at the landing-pad interfaces even though these are the locations of minimal current-crowding, which requires proper modeling of CTE-mismatch induced stresses to explain.

Fig. 2: Calibration of an Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tool allows for accurate prediction of transistor performance depending on distance from a TSV. (Source: Mentor Graphics)

Planned for July 16, 2015 at SEMICON West in San Francisco, a presentation on “3DIC Technology Past, Present and Future” will be part of one of the side Semiconductor Technology Sessions (STS). Ramakanth Alapati, Director of Packaging Strategy and Marketing, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, will discuss the underlying economic, supply chain and technology factors that will drive productization of 3DIC technology as we know it today. Key to understanding the dynamic of technology adaptation is using performance/$ as a metric.

Samsung to put 10nm chips into mass production by end of 2016

Friday, May 22nd, 2015

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By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

Samsung Semiconductor on Thursday announced that it will have 10-nanometer FinFET chips in volume production by the end of next year.

At an event in San Francisco, the Samsung Electronics subsidiary exhibited a 12-inch wafer with what it said were 10nm FinFET semiconductors. Over the next 18 months, Samsung will provide process design kits and multi-die wafers for the 10nm FinFET chips.

Samsung Semiconductor is also ramping up volume production of 14nm FinFET chips at its S1 wafer fabrication facility in South Korea and its S2 fab in Austin, Texas, while preparing the S3 fab in South Korea for 14nm FinFET volume production. In addition, GlobalFoundries will implement the Samsung 14nm FinFET process at its chip-making facilities in New York State.

“We are in business for 14-nanometer FinFET,” said Hong Hao, senior vice president for Samsung’s foundry business. “We have brought broad competition back into the foundry business.”

Samsung Foundry has closely matched Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing in providing 14nm and now 10nm chips.

Hao said Samsung will support “a broad range of applications” with chips coming out of its foundry fablines – consumer electronics, mobile devices, computing, networking, and data center infrastructure.

He also noted that Samsung is offering a 28nm fully-depleted silicon-on-insulator process, licensed from STMicroelectronics.

Samsung Semiconductor executives made brief presentations on other product areas for the chipmaker, and also reported on progress in constructing the company’s new facility in northern San Jose, Calif., which will be occupied this summer.

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