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Posts Tagged ‘AMC’

Fab Facilities Data and Defectivity

Monday, August 1st, 2016

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

In-the-know attendees at SEMICON West at a Thursday morning working breakfast heard from executives representing the world’s leading memory fabs discuss manufacturing challenges at the 4th annual Entegris Yield Forum. Among the excellent presenters was Norm Armour, managing director worldwide facilities and corporate EHSS of Micron. Armour has been responsible for some of the most famous fabs in the world, including the Malta, New York logic fab of GlobalFoundries, and AMD’s Fab25 in Austin, Texas. He discussed how facilities systems effect yield and parametric control in the fab.

Just recently, his organization within Micron broke records working with M&W on the new flagship Fab 10X in Singapore—now running 3D-NAND—by going from ground-breaking to first-tool-in in less than 12 months, followed by over 400 tools installed in 3 months. “The devil is in the details across the board, especially for 20nm and below,” declared Armour. “Fabs are delicate ecosystems. I’ll give a few examples from a high-volume fab of things that you would never expect to see, of component-level failures that caused major yield crashes.”

Ultra-Pure Water (UPW)

Ultra-Pure Water (UPW) is critical for IC fab processes including cleaning, etching, CMP, and immersion lithography, and contamination specs are now at the part-per-billion (ppb) or part-per-trillion (ppt) levels. Use of online monitoring is mandatory to mitigate risk of contamination. International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) guidelines for UPW quality (minimum acceptable standard) include the following critical parameters:

  • Resistivity @ 25C >18.0 Mohm-cm,
  • TOC <1.0 ppb,
  • Particles/ml < 0.3 @ 0.05 um, and
  • Bacteria by culture 1000 ml <1.

In one case associated with a gate cleaning tool, elevated levels of zinc were detected with lots that had passed through one particular tool for a variation on a classic SC1 wet clean. High-purity chemistries were eliminated as sources based on analytical testing, so the root-cause analysis shifted to to the UPW system as a possible source. Then statistical analysis could show a positive correlation between UPW supply lines equipped with pressure regulators and the zinc exposure. The pressure regulator vendor confirmed use of zinc-oxide and zinc-stearate as part of the assembly process of the pressure regulator. “It was really a curing agent for an elastomer diaphragm that caused the contamination of multiple lots,” confided Armour.

UPW pressure regulators are just one of many components used in facilities builds that can significantly degrade fab yield. It is critical to implement a rigorous component testing and qualification process prior to component installation and widespread use. “Don’t take anything for granted,” advised Armour. “Things like UPW regulators have a first-order impact upon yield and they need to be characterized carefully, especially during new fab construction and fit up.”

Photoresist filtration

Photoresist filtration has always been important to ensure high yield in manufacturing, but it has become ultra-critical for lithography at the 20nm node and below. Dependable filtration is particularly important because industry lacks in-line monitoring technology capable of detecting particles in the range below ~40nm.

Micron tried using filters with 50nm pore diameters for a 20nm node process…and saw excessive yield losses along with extreme yield variability. “We characterized pressure-drop as a function of flow-rate, and looked at various filter performances for both 20nm and 40nm particles,” explained Armour. “We implemented a new filter, and lo and behold saw a step function increase in our yields. Defect densities dropped dramatically.” Tracking the yields over time showed that the variability was significantly reduced around the higher yield-entitlement level.

Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC)

Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC) is ‘public enemy number one’ in 20nm-node and below fabs around the world. “In one case there were forrest fires in Sumatra and the smoke was going into the atmosphere and actually went into our air intakes in a high volume fab in Taiwan thousands of miles away, and we saw a spike in hydrogen-sulfide,” confided Armour. “It increased our copper CMP defects, due to copper migration. After we installed higher-quality AMC filters for the make-up air units we saw dramatic improvement in copper defects. So what is most important is that you have real-time on-line monitoring of AMC levels.”

Building collaborative relationships with vendors is critical for troubleshooting component issues and improving component quality. “Partnering with suppliers like Entegris is absolutely essential,” continued Armour. “On AMCs for example, we have had a very close partnership that developed out of a team working together at our Inotera fab in Taiwan. There are thousands of important technologies that we need to leverage now to guarantee high yields in leading-node fabs.” The Figure shows just some of the AMCs that must be monitored in real-time.

Big Data

The only way to manage all of this complexity is with “Big Data” and in addition to primary process parameter that must be tracked there are many essential facilities inputs to analytics:

  • Environmental Parameters – temperature, humidity, pressure, particle count, AMCs, etc.
  • Equipment Parameters – run state, motor current, vibration, valve position, etc.
  • Effluent Parameters – cooling water, vacuum, UPW, chemicals, slurries, gases, etc.

“Conventional wisdom is that process tools create 90% of your defect density loss, but that’s changing toward facilities now,” said Armour. “So why not apply the same methodologies within facilities that we do in the fab?” SPC is after-the-fact reactive, while APC is real-time fault detection on input variables, including such parameters as vibration or flow-rate of a pump.

“Never enough data,” enthused Armour. “In terms of monitoring input variables, we do this through the PLCs and basically use SCADA to do the fault-detection interdiction on the critical input variables. This has been proven to be highly effective, providing a lot of protection, and letting me sleep better at night.”

Micron also uses these data to provide site-to-site comparisons. “We basically drive our laggard sites to meet our world-class sites in terms of reducing variation on facility input variables,” explained Armour. “We’re improving our forecasting as a result of this capability, and ultimately protecting our fab yields. Again, the last thing a fab manager wants to see is facilities causing yield loss and variation.”

—E.K.

Research Alert: May 20, 2014

Tuesday, May 20th, 2014

Lighting the way to graphene-based devices

Researchers with Berkeley Lab and the University of California (UC) Berkeley have demonstrated a technique whereby the electronic properties of GBN heterostructures can be modified with visible light. Feng Wang, a condensed matter physicist with Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division and UC Berkeley’s Physics Department, as well as an investigator for the Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, led a study in which photo-induced doping of GBN heterostructures was used to create p–n junctions and other useful doping profiles while preserving the material’s remarkably high electron mobility.

“We’ve demonstrated that visible light can induce a robust writing and erasing of charge-doping in GBN heterostructures without sacrificing high carrier mobility,” Wang says. “The use of visible light gives us incredible flexibility and, unlike electrostatic gating and chemical doping, does not require multi-step fabrication processes that reduce sample quality. Additionally, different patterns can be imparted and erased at will, which was not possible with doping techniques previously used on GBN heterostructures.”

“We’ve shown show that this photo-induced doping arises from microscopically coupled optical and electrical responses in the GBN heterostructures, including optical excitation of defect transitions in boron nitride, electrical transport in graphene, and charge transfer between boron nitride and graphene,” Wang says. “This is analogous to the modulation doping first developed for high-quality semiconductors.”

While the photo-induced modulation doping of GBN heterostructures only lasted a few days if the sample was kept in darkness – further exposure to light erased the effect – this is not a concern as Wang explains.

“A few days of modulation doping are sufficient for many avenues of scientific inquiry, and for some device applications, the rewritability we can provide is needed more than long term stability,” he says. “For the moment, what we have is a simple technique for inhomogeneous doping in a high-mobility graphene material that opens the door to novel scientific studies and applications.”

SMIC and other groups collaborate to setup the “IC Advanced Technology Research Institute”

China’s largest and most advanced semiconductor foundry this week announced that SMIC, Wuhan Xinxin, Tsinghua University, Beijing University, Fudan University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Microelectronics have collaborated to setup the “IC Advanced Technology Research Institute” to create the most advanced IC technology research and development institution in China.

Currently, the research institute will focus on the mainstream 20nm and below technologies for research and development which includes advanced logic technology, advanced non-volatile memory technology, verification of domestic equipment and materials, and related IP qualifications etc. It will also follow up with the industry’s technology development and the actual needs of the customers, and will invite design, equipment, material companies, and upstream and downstream industries. They can join in as a member or in project collaboration. This institute will strengthen its international exchange and cooperation, to promote the establishment our IP infrastructure, to speed up the cultivation of patents and talent, in order to raise the core competitiveness of innovation in China’s IC industry.

On Solid State Technology: What to look for at IITC

Are you at IITC this week? Here’s a look at the key presentations being given and topics being covered all week at the 17th annual IITC/AMC conference in San Jose, California.

Blog review April 22, 2014

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

Pete Singer blogs that it’s difficult to make interconnects much smaller without introducing significant increases in resistivity. At the upcoming IITC/AMC joint conference in May, many papers focus on new materials that could lead to reduced resistivity and enable further interconnect scaling. Most notably, graphene and CNTs provide an interesting alternative to copper.

Phil Garrou continues his analysis of the IMAPS Device Packaging Conference with a look at the presentations made by Flip Chip International and SUSS (the use of lasers in the manufacturing of WLP); GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Amkor and Open Silicon (a 2.5D ARM dual core product demonstrator which consists of 2 ARM die on a high density silicon interposer); Corning (results of multiple glass interposer programs) and Namics (underfill products for FC BGA and FC CSP).