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Posts Tagged ‘atomic’

Mechanistic Modeling of Silicon ALE for FinFETs

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

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With billions of device features on the most advanced silicon CMOS ICs, the industry needs to be able to precisely etch atomic-scale features without over-etching. Atomic layer etching (ALE), can ideally remove uniform layers of material with consistent thickness in each cycle, and can improve uniformity, reduce damage, increase selectivity, and minimize aspect ratio dependent etching (ARDE) rates. Researchers Chad Huard et al. from the University of Michigan and Lam Research recently published “Atomic layer etching of 3D structures in silicon: Self-limiting and nonideal reactions” in the latest issue of the Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology A (http://dx.doi.org/10.1116/1.4979661). Proper control of sub-cycle pulse times is the key to preventing gas mixing that can degrade the fidelity of ALE.

The authors modeled non-idealities in the ALE of silicon using Ar/Cl2 plasmas:  passivation using Ar/Cl2 plasma resulting in a single layer of SiClx, followed by Ar-ion bombardment to remove the single passivated layer. Un-surprisingly, they found that ideal ALE requires self-limited processes during both steps. Decoupling passivation and etching allows for several advantages over continuous etching, including more ideal etch profiles, high selectivity, and low plasma-induced damage. Any continuous etching —when either or both process steps are not fully self-limited— can cause ARDE and surface roughness.

The gate etch in a finFET process requires that 3D corners be accurately resolved to maintain a uniform gate length along the height of the fin. In so doing, the roughness of the etch surface and the exact etch depth per cycle (EPC) are not as critical as the ability of ALE to be resistant to ARDE. The Figure shows that the geometry modeled was a periodic array of vertical crystalline silicon fins, each 10nm wide and 42nm high, set at a pitch of 42 nm. For continuous etching (a-c), simulations used a 70/30 mix of Ar/Cl gas and RF bias of 30V. Just before the etch-front touches the underlying SiO2 (a), the profile has tapered away from the trench sidewalls and the etch-front shows some micro-trenching produced by ions (or hot neutrals) specularly reflected from the tapered sidewalls. After a 25% over-etch (b), a significant amount of Si remains in the corners and on the sides of the fins. Even after an over-etch of 100% (c), Si still remains in the corners.

FIGURE CAPTION: Simulated profiles resulting from etching finFET gates with (a)–(c) a continuous etching process, or (d)–(f) an optimized ALE process. Time increases from left to right, and images represent equal over-etch (as a percentage of the time required to expose the bottom SiO2) not equal etch times. Times listed for the ALE process in (d)–(f) represent plasma-on, ignoring any purge or dwell times. (Source: J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A, Vol. 35, No. 3, May/Jun 2017)

In comparison, the ALE process (d-f) shows that after 25% over-etch (e) the bottom SiO2 surface would be almost completely cleared with minimal corner residues, and continuing to 100% over-etch results in little change to the profile. The ALE process times shown here do not include the gas purge and fill times between plasma pulses; to clear the feature using ALE required 200 pulses and assuming 5 seconds of purge time between each pulse results in a total process time of 15–20 min to clear the feature. This is a significant increase in total process time over the continuous etch (2 min).

One conclusion of this ALE modeling is that even small deviations from perfectly self-limited reactions significantly compromise the ideality of the ALE process. For example, having as little as 10 ppm Cl2 residual gas in the chamber during the ion bombardment phase produced non-idealities in the ALE. Introducing any source of continuous chemical etching into the ALE process leads to the onset of ARDE and roughening of the etch front. These trends have significant implications for both the design of specialized ALE chambers, and also for the use of ALE to control uniformity.

—E.K.

2D Materials May Be Brittle

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

International researchers using a novel in situ quantitative tensile testing platform have tested the uniform in-plane loading of freestanding membranes of 2D materials inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Led by materials researchers at Rice University, the in situ tensile testing reveals the brittle fracture of large-area molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) crystals and measures their fracture strength for the first time. Borophene monolayers with a wavy topography are more flexible.

A communication to Advanced Materials online (DOI: 10.1002/adma.201604201) titled “Brittle Fracture of 2D MoSe2” by Yinchao Yang et al. disclosed work by researchers from the USA and China led by Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering Professor Jun Lou at Rice University, Houston, Texas. His team found that MoSe2 is more brittle than expected, and that flaws as small as one missing atom can initiate catastrophic cracking under strain.

“It turns out not all 2D crystals are equal. Graphene is a lot more robust compared with some of the others we’re dealing with right now, like this molybdenum diselenide,” says Lou. “We think it has something to do with defects inherent to these materials. It’s very hard to detect them. Even if a cluster of vacancies makes a bigger hole, it’s difficult to find using any technique.” The team has posted a short animation online showing crack propagation.

2D Materials in a 3D World -222

While all real physical things in our world are inherently built as three-dimensional (3D) structures, a single layer of flat atoms approximates a two-dimensional (2D) structure. Except for special superconducting crystals frozen below the Curie temperature, when electrons flow through 3D materials there are always collisions which increase resistance and heat. However, certain single layers of crystals have atoms aligned such that electron transport is essentially confined within the 2D plane, and those electrons may move “ballistically” without being slowed by collisions.

MoSe2 is a dichalcogenide, a 2D semiconducting material that appears as a graphene-like hexagonal array from above but is actually a sandwich of Mo atoms between two layers of Se chalcogen atoms. MoSe2 is being considered for use as transistors and in next-generation solar cells, photodetectors, and catalysts as well as electronic and optical devices.

The Figure shows the micron-scale sample holder inside a SEM, where natural van der Waals forces held the sample in place on springy cantilever arms that measured the applied stress. Lead-author Yang is a postdoctoral researcher at Rice who developed a new dry-transfer process to exfoliate MoSe2 from the surface upon which it had been grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD).

Custom built micron-scale mechanical jig used to test mechanical properties of nano-scale materials. (Source: Lou Group/Rice University)

The team measured the elastic modulus—the amount of stretching a material can handle and still return to its initial state—of MoSe2 at 177.2 (plus or minus 9.3) gigapascals (GPa). Graphene is more than five times as elastic. The fracture strength—amount of stretching a material can handle before breaking—was measured at 4.8 (plus or minus 2.9) GPa. Graphene is nearly 25 times stronger.

“The important message of this work is the brittle nature of these materials,” Lou says. “A lot of people are thinking about using 2D crystals because they’re inherently thin. They’re thinking about flexible electronics because they are semiconductors and their theoretical elastic strength should be very high. According to our calculations, they can be stretched up to 10 percent. The samples we have tested so far broke at 2 to 3 percent (of the theoretical maximum) at most.”

Borophene

“Wavy” borophene might be better, according to finding of other Rice University scientists. The Rice lab of theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and experimental collaborators observed examples of naturally undulating metallic borophene—an atom-thick layer of boron—and suggested that transferring it onto an elastic surface would preserve the material’s stretchability along with its useful electronic properties.

Highly conductive graphene has promise for flexible electronics, but it is too stiff for devices that must repeatably bend, stretch, compress, or even twist. The Rice researchers found that borophene deposited on a silver substrate develops nanoscale corrugations, and due to weak binding to the silver can be exfoliated for transfer to a flexible surface. The research appeared recently in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters.

Rice University has been one of the world’s leading locations for the exploration of 1D and 2D materials research, ever since it was lucky enough to get a visionary genius like Richard Smalley to show up in 1976, so we should expect excellent work from people in their department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering (CSNE). Still, this ground-breaking work is being done in labs using tools capable of handling micron-scale substrates, so even after a metaphorical “path” has been found it will take a lot of work to build up a manufacturing roadway capable of fabricating meter-scale substrates.

—E.K.