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Archive for February, 2017

Flagello to receive Zernike Award at SPIE Advanced Lithography

Friday, February 24th, 2017

Flagello-DonisDonis Flagello, president, CEO, and COO of Nikon Research Corporation of America (NRCA), will be presented with the 2017 Frits Zernike Award for Microlithography on Monday 27 February during SPIE Advanced Lithography in San Jose, California. The award, presented annually for outstanding accomplishments in microlithography technology, recognizes Flagello’s leading role in understanding and improving image formation in optical lithography for semiconductor manufacturing.

A prominent member of the industry since the early 1980s and a longtime SPIE Fellow, Flagello has primarily focused on the rigorous application of physics to lithography modeling and problem solving. Early in his career, while at IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, he developed the first practical test for measuring flare in optical lithography tools and made major contributions to high numerical aperture (NA) modeling including vector and polarization effects, and radiometric correction. At ASML he played an important role in providing analysis of aberrations for new systems and high-NA imaging effects due to polarization.

Another notable aspect of his career, Flagello’s presentations at lithography conferences and papers in various journals have inspired a better understanding of optics and resist behavior and helped drive optical lithography forward, colleagues said. “His presentations are known for their combination of humor with a deep understanding of the complex interactions between physical optics and lithographic process technology,” said David Williamson, an NRCA Fellow and previous Frits Zernike Award winner. “His combined theoretical and practical production experience and knowledge are rare in this field.”

—E.K.

Photoelectric measure of atomically thin stacks

Friday, February 17th, 2017

A team led by researchers at the University of Warwick have discovered a breakthrough in how to measure the electronic structures of stacked 2D semiconductors using the photoelectric (PE) effect. Materials scientists around the world have been investigating various heterostructures to create different 2D materials, and stacking different combinations of 2D materials creates new materials with new properties.

The new PE method measures the electronic properties of each layer in a stack, allowing researchers to establish the optimal structure for the fastest, most efficient transfer of electrical energy. “It is extremely exciting to be able to see, for the first time, how interactions between atomically thin layers change their electronic structure,” says Neil Wilson, who helped to develop the method. Wilson is from the physics department at the University of Warwick.

Wilson formulated the technique in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Warwick, University of Cambridge, University of Washington, and the Elettra Light Source in Italy. The team reported their findings in Science Advances (DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1601832).

—E.K.