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Archive for November, 2016

China to be 15% of World Fab Capacity by 2018

Tuesday, November 29th, 2016

Currently there are eight Chinese 300mm-diameter silicon IC fabs in operation as 2016 comes to a close. Chinese IC fab capacity now accounts for approximately 7% of worldwide 300mm capacity, as reported by VLSIresearch in a recent edition of its Critical Subsystems report (https://www.vlsiresearch.com/public/csubs/). This will expand rapidly, as ten are now under construction and two more have been announced. China’s 300mm fabs are located in ten cities.

“Total Chinese capacity is expected to be around 13 million by end 2018,” said John West of VLSI Research. Worldwide 300mm wafer fabrication capacity will exceed 85 million wafers per year in 2018, putting China in control of 15% of worldwide 300mm capacity in 2018. While new Chinese fabs have yet to prove they can produce leading edge silicon ICs with high yields, it should be only a matter of time before they prove they stand among the world’s great semiconductor production regions.

West recently presented a China market outlook for semiconductors, original equipment manufacturers (OEM), and critical subsystems at the recent Critical Materials Council (CMC) Seminar (http:cmcfabs.org/seminars) held in Shanghai. At the same event, representatives from Intel and TI discussed supply-chain dynamics in China, and Secretary General Ingrid Shi of the Integrated Circuit Materials Industry Technology Innovative Alliance (ICMITIA) presented on “The China Materials Supply Consortium and China’s 5 Year Technology Plan.”

The 2016 CMC Seminar also saw a presentation of China’s first semiconductor-grade 300mm silicon wafer supplier:  the recently unveiled Zing Semiconductor (www.zingsemi.com). Founder and CEO Richard Chang, co-founder of SMIC, has assembled a team and funding to start creating wafers in the Pudong region of Shanghai. He showed a photo of his company’s first 300mm silicon boule at the event.

[DISCLOSURE:  Ed Korczynski is also Marketing Director for TECHCET CA, an advisor firm that administers the Critical Materials Council and CMC events.]

—E.K.

Reliable ICs from unreliable devices

Thursday, November 10th, 2016

In an article published in the most recent issue of imec’s online magazine (http://magazine.imec.be/) titled “Chips must learn how to feel pain and how to cure themselves,” researchers Francky Chatthoor and Guido Groeseneken discuss how to build reliable “5nm-node” ICs out of inherently unreliable transistors. Variability in “zero time” and “over time” performance of individual transistors cannot be controlled below the “7nm-node” using traditional guard-banding in IC design.

“Maybe it means the end of the guard-band approach, but certainly not the end of scaling,” says Groeseneken in the article. “In our research group we measure and tried to understand reliability issues in scaled devices. In the 40nm technology, it is still possible to cope with the reliability issues of the devices and make a good system. But at 7nm, the unreliability of the devices risks to affect the whole system. And conventional design techniques can’t stop this from happening. New design paradigms are therefore urgently needed.” These researchers predict that industry will have to manufacture self-healing chips by the year 2025.

Self-healing chips could use the workload variation of the system for their benefit. Based on a deterministic predictor of the future, future slack is determined and used to compensate for the delay error and mitigate at peak load. (Source: imec) Self-healing chips could use the workload variation of the system for their benefit. Based on a deterministic predictor of the future, future slack is determined and used to compensate for the delay error and mitigate at peak load. (Source: imec)

The ultimate goal of imec and its academic partners is to develop a fully proactive parametric reliability mitigation technique with distributed monitors, a control system and actuators, fully preventing the consequence of delay faults and potentially also of functional faults. Said Catthour, “the secret to the solution lies in the work load variation of the system. Based on a deterministic predictor of the future, you determine future slack and use this to compensate for the delay error at peak load. Based on this info on the future, you change the scheduling order and the assignment of operations.” The Figure shows how self-healing chips can use future slack to compensate for delay error and mitigate at peak load.

—E.K.