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Posts Tagged ‘PROVision’

Applied Materials Intros High Res E-Beam Inspection System

Monday, July 11th, 2016

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Applied Materials, Inc. introduced its next-generation e-beam inspection system that offers resolution down to 1nm. This allows users to detect the most challenging “killer” defects that other technologies cannot find, and to monitor process marginality to rapidly resolve ramp issues and achieve higher yields. Called PROVision™, the system offers 3x faster throughput over existing e-beam hotspot inspection tools.

Ram Peltinov, senior director, strategic marketing for the Process Diagnostics and Control Group at Applied Materials, said the development of the new system was driven by a number of new challenges: Structures and defects are now too small for optical resolution; multi-patterning triggers a need for massive measurements; and 3D architectures limit the ability to detect and measure.

“FinFETs are becoming increasingly complex, the multi-patterning creates multiple steps, the DRAM aspect ratios are getting very high and the VNAND is going vertical,” he said. “All these changes are happening in parallel and this creates great opportunity for metrology and inspection,” he said. According to Gartner, the market for e-beam inspection systems has tripled in the last five years, from $81M in 2010 to $241M in 2015.

The system’s high current density (beam current per sampling area) eliminates the sampling/throughput tradeoff of previous systems, allowing the fastest sampling throughput at its 1nm resolution. Imaging capabilities encompass techniques such as see-through, high aspect ratio, 360° topography, and back-scattered electron detection.

“It allows them to capture defects they couldn’t see before,” Peltinov said. The system can detect, for example, epi-overgrowth in FinFETs. “While the epi overgrowth is clearly visible on the PROVision, it’s almost impossible to see in conventional EBI. Without the resolution and the special imaging, it’s very difficult to catch that.”

“They can also increase their sampling with the faster throughput on the most challenging layers. This also helps them reveal process signatures of their most subtle process variation,”  Peltinov added. Massive sampling reveals hidden process trends and “signatures” that help identify sources of abnormalities, and shorten the time to root cause from days to minutes.


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