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Fab Facilities Data and Defectivity

Monday, August 1st, 2016


By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

In-the-know attendees at SEMICON West at a Thursday morning working breakfast heard from executives representing the world’s leading memory fabs discuss manufacturing challenges at the 4th annual Entegris Yield Forum. Among the excellent presenters was Norm Armour, managing director worldwide facilities and corporate EHSS of Micron. Armour has been responsible for some of the most famous fabs in the world, including the Malta, New York logic fab of GlobalFoundries, and AMD’s Fab25 in Austin, Texas. He discussed how facilities systems effect yield and parametric control in the fab.

Just recently, his organization within Micron broke records working with M&W on the new flagship Fab 10X in Singapore—now running 3D-NAND—by going from ground-breaking to first-tool-in in less than 12 months, followed by over 400 tools installed in 3 months. “The devil is in the details across the board, especially for 20nm and below,” declared Armour. “Fabs are delicate ecosystems. I’ll give a few examples from a high-volume fab of things that you would never expect to see, of component-level failures that caused major yield crashes.”

Ultra-Pure Water (UPW)

Ultra-Pure Water (UPW) is critical for IC fab processes including cleaning, etching, CMP, and immersion lithography, and contamination specs are now at the part-per-billion (ppb) or part-per-trillion (ppt) levels. Use of online monitoring is mandatory to mitigate risk of contamination. International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) guidelines for UPW quality (minimum acceptable standard) include the following critical parameters:

  • Resistivity @ 25C >18.0 Mohm-cm,
  • TOC <1.0 ppb,
  • Particles/ml < 0.3 @ 0.05 um, and
  • Bacteria by culture 1000 ml <1.

In one case associated with a gate cleaning tool, elevated levels of zinc were detected with lots that had passed through one particular tool for a variation on a classic SC1 wet clean. High-purity chemistries were eliminated as sources based on analytical testing, so the root-cause analysis shifted to to the UPW system as a possible source. Then statistical analysis could show a positive correlation between UPW supply lines equipped with pressure regulators and the zinc exposure. The pressure regulator vendor confirmed use of zinc-oxide and zinc-stearate as part of the assembly process of the pressure regulator. “It was really a curing agent for an elastomer diaphragm that caused the contamination of multiple lots,” confided Armour.

UPW pressure regulators are just one of many components used in facilities builds that can significantly degrade fab yield. It is critical to implement a rigorous component testing and qualification process prior to component installation and widespread use. “Don’t take anything for granted,” advised Armour. “Things like UPW regulators have a first-order impact upon yield and they need to be characterized carefully, especially during new fab construction and fit up.”

Photoresist filtration

Photoresist filtration has always been important to ensure high yield in manufacturing, but it has become ultra-critical for lithography at the 20nm node and below. Dependable filtration is particularly important because industry lacks in-line monitoring technology capable of detecting particles in the range below ~40nm.

Micron tried using filters with 50nm pore diameters for a 20nm node process…and saw excessive yield losses along with extreme yield variability. “We characterized pressure-drop as a function of flow-rate, and looked at various filter performances for both 20nm and 40nm particles,” explained Armour. “We implemented a new filter, and lo and behold saw a step function increase in our yields. Defect densities dropped dramatically.” Tracking the yields over time showed that the variability was significantly reduced around the higher yield-entitlement level.

Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC)

Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC) is ‘public enemy number one’ in 20nm-node and below fabs around the world. “In one case there were forrest fires in Sumatra and the smoke was going into the atmosphere and actually went into our air intakes in a high volume fab in Taiwan thousands of miles away, and we saw a spike in hydrogen-sulfide,” confided Armour. “It increased our copper CMP defects, due to copper migration. After we installed higher-quality AMC filters for the make-up air units we saw dramatic improvement in copper defects. So what is most important is that you have real-time on-line monitoring of AMC levels.”

Building collaborative relationships with vendors is critical for troubleshooting component issues and improving component quality. “Partnering with suppliers like Entegris is absolutely essential,” continued Armour. “On AMCs for example, we have had a very close partnership that developed out of a team working together at our Inotera fab in Taiwan. There are thousands of important technologies that we need to leverage now to guarantee high yields in leading-node fabs.” The Figure shows just some of the AMCs that must be monitored in real-time.

Big Data

The only way to manage all of this complexity is with “Big Data” and in addition to primary process parameter that must be tracked there are many essential facilities inputs to analytics:

  • Environmental Parameters – temperature, humidity, pressure, particle count, AMCs, etc.
  • Equipment Parameters – run state, motor current, vibration, valve position, etc.
  • Effluent Parameters – cooling water, vacuum, UPW, chemicals, slurries, gases, etc.

“Conventional wisdom is that process tools create 90% of your defect density loss, but that’s changing toward facilities now,” said Armour. “So why not apply the same methodologies within facilities that we do in the fab?” SPC is after-the-fact reactive, while APC is real-time fault detection on input variables, including such parameters as vibration or flow-rate of a pump.

“Never enough data,” enthused Armour. “In terms of monitoring input variables, we do this through the PLCs and basically use SCADA to do the fault-detection interdiction on the critical input variables. This has been proven to be highly effective, providing a lot of protection, and letting me sleep better at night.”

Micron also uses these data to provide site-to-site comparisons. “We basically drive our laggard sites to meet our world-class sites in terms of reducing variation on facility input variables,” explained Armour. “We’re improving our forecasting as a result of this capability, and ultimately protecting our fab yields. Again, the last thing a fab manager wants to see is facilities causing yield loss and variation.”


Mentor Graphics U2U Meeting April 26 in Santa Clara

Monday, April 11th, 2016


Mentor Graphics’ User2User meeting will be held in Santa Clara on April 26, 2016. The meeting is a highly interactive, in-depth technical conference focused on real world experiences using Mentor tools to design leading-edge products.

Admission and parking for User2User is free and includes all technical sessions, lunch and a networking reception at the end of the day. Interested parties can register on-line in advance.

Wally Rhines, Chairman and CEO of Mentor Graphics, will kick things off at 9:00am with a keynote talk on “Merger Mania.“ Wally notes that in 2015, the transaction value of semiconductor mergers was at an all-time historic high.  What is much more remarkable is that the average size of the merging companies is five times as large as in the past five years, he said. This major change in the structure of the semiconductor industry suggests that there will be changes that affect everything from how we define and design products to how efficiently we develop and manufacture them. Dr. Rhines will examine the data and provide conclusions and predictions.

He will be followed by another keynote talk at 10:00 by Zach Shelby, VP of Marketing for the Internet of Things at ARM. Zach was co-founder of Sensinode, where he was CEO, CTO and Chief Nerd for the ground-breaking company before its acquisition by ARM. Before starting Sensinode, Zach led wireless networking research at the Centre for Wireless Communications and at the Technical Research Center of Finland.

After user sessions and lunch, a panel will convene at 1:00pm to address the topic “Ripple or Tidal Wave: What’s driving the next wave of innovation and semiconductor growth?” Technology innovation was once fueled by the personal computer, communications, and mobile devices. Large capital investment and startup funding was rewarded with market growth and increased silicon shipments. Things are certainly consolidating, perhaps slowing down in the semiconductor market, so what’s going to drive the next wave of growth?  What types of designs will be staffed and funded? Is it IoT?  Wearables?  Automotive?  Experts will address these and other questions and examine what is driving growth and what innovation is yet to come.

Attendees can pick from nine technical tracks focused on AMS Verification, Calibre I and II, Emulation, Functional Verification, High Speed, IC Digital Implementation, PCB Flow, and Silicon Test & Yield Solutions. You’ll hear cases studies directly from users and also updates from Mentor Graphics experts.

These user sessions will be held at 11:10-12:00am, 2:00-2:50pm and 3:10-5:00pm.

A few of the highlights:

  • Oracle’s use of advanced fill techniques for improving manufacturing yield
  • How Xilinx built a custom ESD verification methodology on the Calibre platform
  • Qualcomm used emulation for better RTL design exploration for power, leading to more accurate power analysis and sign-off at the gate level
  • Micron’s experience with emulation, a full environment for debug of SSD controller designs, plus future plans for emulation
  • Microsoft use of portable stimulus to increase productivity, automate the creation of high-quality stimulus, and increase design quality
  • Formal verification at MicroSemi to create a rigorous, pre-code check-in review process that prevents bugs from infecting the master RTL
  • A methodology for modeling, simulation of highly integrated multi-die package designs at SanDisk
  • How Samsung and nVidia use new Automatic RTL Floorplanning capabilities on their advanced SoC designs
  • Structure test at AMD: traditional ATPG and Cell-Aware ATPG flows, as well as verification flows and enhancements

Other users presenting include experts from Towerjazz, Broadcom, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Silicon Creations, MaxLinear, Silicon Labs, Marvell, HiSilicon, Qualcomm, Soft Machines, Agilent, Samtec, Honewell, ST Microelectronics, SHLC, ViaSat, Optimum, NXP, ON Semiconductor and MCD.

The day winds up with a closing session and networking reception from 5:00-6:00pm.

Registration is from 8:00-9:00am in the morning.

Many Mixes to Match Litho Apps

Thursday, March 3rd, 2016


By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

“Mix and Match” has long been a mantra for lithographers in the deep-sub-wavelength era of IC device manufacturing. In general, forming patterns with resolution at minimum pitch as small as 1/4 the wavelength of light can be done using off-axis illumination (OAI) through reticle enhancement techniques (RET) on masks, using optical proximity correction (OPC) perhaps derived from inverse lithography technology (ILT). Lithographers can form 40-45nm wide lines and spaces at the same half-pitch using 193nm light (from ArF lasers) in a single exposure.

Figure 1 shows that application-specific tri-layer photoresists are used to reach the minimum resolution of 193nm-immersion (193i) steppers in a single exposure. Tighter half-pitch features can be created using all manner of multi-patterning processes, including Litho-Etch-Litho-Etch (LELE or LE2) using two masks for a single layer or Self-Aligned Double Patterning (SADP) using sidewall spacers to accomplish pitch-splitting. SADP has been used in high volume manufacturing (HVM) of logic and memory ICs for many years now, and Self-Aligned Quadruple Patterning (SAQP) has been used in HVM by at least one leading memory fab.

Fig.1: Basic tri-layer resist (TLR) technology uses thin Photoresist over silicon-containing Hard-Mask over Spin-On Carbon (SOC), for patterning critical layers of advanced ICs. (Source: Brewer Science)

Next-Generation Lithography (NGL) generally refers to any post-optical technology with at least some unique niche patterning capability of interest to IC fabs:  Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV), Directed Self-Assembly (DSA), and Nano-Imprint Lithography (NIL). Though proponents of each NGL have dutifully shown capabilities for targeted mask layers for logic or memory, the capabilities of ArF dry and immersion (ArFi) scanners to process >250 wafers/hour with high uptime dominates the economics of HVM lithography.

The world’s leading lithographers gather each year in San Jose, California at SPIE’s Advanced Lithography conference to discuss how to extend optical lithography. So of all the NGL technologies, which will win out in the end?

It is looking most likely that the answer is “all of the above.” EUV and NIL could be used for single layers. For other unique patterning application, ArF/ArFi steppers will be used to create a basic grid/template which will be cut/trimmed using one of the available NGL. Each mask layer in an advanced fab will need application-specific patterning integration, and one of the rare commonalities between all integrated litho modules is the overwhelming need to improve pattern overlay performance.

Naga Chandrasekaran, Micron Corp. vice president of Process R&D, provided a fantastic overview of the patterning requirements for advanced memory chips in a presentation during Nikon’s LithoVision technical symposium held February 21st in San Jose, California prior to the start of SPIE-AL. While resolution improvements are always desired, in the mix-and-match era the greatest challenges involve pattern overlay issues. “In high volume manufacturing, every nanometer variation translates into yield loss, so what is the best overlay that we can deliver as a holistic solution not just considering stepper resolution?” asks Chandrasekaran. “We should talk about cost per nanometer overlay improvement.”

Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV)

As touted by ASML at SPIE-AL, the brightness and stability and availability of tin-plasma EUV sources continues to improve to 200W in the lab “for one hour, with full dose control,” according to Michael Lercel, ASML’s director of strategic marketing. ASML’s new TWINSCAN NXE:3350B EUVL scanners are now being shipped with 125W power sources, and Intel and Samsung Electronics reported run their EUV power sources at 80W over extended periods.

During Nikon’s LithoVision event, Mark Phillips, Intel Fellow and Director of Lithography Technology Development for Logic, summarized recent progress of EUVL technology:  ~500 wafers-per-day is now standard, and ~1000 wafer-per-day can sometimes happen. However, since grids can be made with ArFi for 1/3 the cost of EUVL even assuming best productivity for the latter, ArFi multi-patterning will continue to be used for most layers. “Resolution is not the only challenge,” reminded Phillips. “Total edge-placement-error in patterning is the biggest challenge to device scaling, and this limit comes before the device physics limit.”

Directed Self-Assembly (DSA)

DSA seems most suited for patterning the periodic 2D arrays used in memory chips such as DRAMs. “Virtual fabrication using directed self-assembly for process optimization in a 14nm DRAM node” was the title of a presentation at SPIE-AL by researchers from Coventor, in which DSA compared favorably to SAQP.

Imec presented electrical results of DSA-formed vias, providing insight on DSA processing variations altering device results. In an exclusive interview with Solid State Technology and SemiMD, imec’s Advanced Patterning Department Director Greg McIntyre reminds us that DSA could save one mask in the patterning of vias which can all be combined into doublets/triplets, since two masks would otherwise be needed to use 193i to do LELE for such a via array. “There have been a lot of patterning tricks developed over the last few years to be able to reduce variability another few nanometers. So all sorts of self-alignments.”

While DSA can be used for shrinking vias that are not doubled/tripled, there are commercially proven spin-on shrink materials that cost much less to use as shown by Kaveri Jain and Scott Light from Micron in their SPIE-AL presentation, “Fundamental characterization of shrink techniques on negative-tone development based dense contact holes.” Chemical shrink processes primarily require control over times, temperatures, and ambients inside a litho track tool to be able repeatably shrink contact hole diameters by 15-25 nm.

Nano-Imprint Litho (NIL)

For advanced IC fab applications, the many different options for NIL technology have been narrowed to just one for IC HVM. The step-and-pattern technology that had been developed and trademarked as “Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography” or “J-FIL” by, has been commercialized for HVM by Canon NanoTechnologies, formerly known as Molecular Imprints. Canon shows improvements in the NIL mask-replication process, since each production mask will need to be replicated from a written master. To use NIL in HVM, mask image placement errors from replication will have to be reduced to ~1nm., while the currently available replication tool is reportedly capable of 2-3nm (3 sigma).

Figure 2 shows normalized costs modeled to produce 15nm half-pitch lines/spaces for different lithography technologies, assuming 125 wph for a single EUV stepper and 60 wph for a cluster of 4 NIL tools. Key to throughput is fast filling of the 26mmx33mm mold nano-cavities by the liquid resist, and proper jetting of resist drops over a thin adhesion layer enables filling times less than 1 second.

Fig.2: Relative estimated costs to pattern 15nm half-pitch lines/spaces for different lithography technologies, assuming 125 wph for a single EUV stepper and 60 wph for a cluster of 4 NIL tools. (Source: Canon)

Researchers from Toshiba and SK Hynix described evaluation results of a long-run defect test of NIL using the Canon FPA-1100 NZ2 pilot production tool, capable of 10 wafers per hour and 8nm overlay, in a presentation at SPIE-AL titled, “NIL defect performance toward high-volume mass production.” The team categorized defects that must be minimized into fundamentally different categories—template, non-filling, separation-related, and pattern collapse—and determined parallel paths to defect reduction to allow for using NIL in HVM of memory chips with <20nm half-pitch features.


Solid State Watch: November 13-19, 2015

Friday, November 20th, 2015
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Click here to read more acquisition news.

Solid State Watch: July 31-August 6, 2015

Friday, August 7th, 2015
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Solid State Watch: July 10-16, 2015

Friday, July 17th, 2015
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CoorsTek Increases its Business with Covalent Acquisition, Organic Growth

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

CoorsTek made one of the biggest acquisitions of its century-long history late last year in purchasing Covalent Materials, formerly known as Toshiba Ceramics.

Jonathan Coors, CEO of the company’s Semiconductor and Medical Group, said Tuesday the Covalent acquisition was “really strategic for us. It enhanced the company as a whole.”

CoorsTek’s Japan market share in engineered ceramics  was “relatively small prior to Covalent,” Coors noted. Covalent broadened CoorsTek’s product portfolio in carbons, quartz, and silicon products, according to Coors.

CoorsTek plans to pursue both organic growth in its business and acquisition opportunities as they present themselves, the CoorsTek executive said.

Asked whether privately held CoorsTek may pursue a public offering, Coors said, “We enjoy being private.” That status offers some “regulatory ease,” he noted.

As a private company, CoorsTek is able to engage in a “long-term thought process, while maintaining focus on quarterly performance,” Coors added.

CoorsTek also provides orthopedic implants, such as hip and knee replacements. Medical products present “a demand on quality that is as high (as semiconductor products), if not higher,” Coors noted. There is a “similar supply chain” in the two product lines, he stated.

Coors and other CoorsTek executives are meeting this week with customers to learn “where the market is heading,” Coors said. Such information gleaned at SEMICON West 2015 can point to “the next generation of growth,” he said.

Micron Technology, in the news this week on reports of a rumored takeover bid by Tsinghua Unigroup, is a customer of CoorsTek, according to Coors.

Solid State Watch: March 20-26, 2015

Thursday, March 26th, 2015
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3D ASIP: “It’s Complicated”

Monday, December 15th, 2014


By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

The presentations at this week’s 3D Architectures in Semiconductor Integration and Packaging conference could be summed up in a famous Facebook status: “It’s complicated.”

They also could be summed up in one word: Progress.

This year has seen tremendous progress in implementation of 3DIC technology, according to speakers at the 11th annual conference, held in Burlingame, Calif. Those who have been touting and tracking 3D chips for years are looking forward to the 2015 introduction of Intel’s Xeon Phi “Knights Landing” processor for high-performance computing, which will incorporate the Hybrid Memory Cube technology in the same package as the CPU.

Activities began Wednesday, December 10, with a preconference symposium on “2.5/3D-IC Design Tools and Flows” and “3D Integration: 3D Process Technology.” Bill Martin of E-System Design kicked off the program with a presentation on path finding, a topic addressed several times over the next two days. He emphasized that preparing for a chip design project, such as choosing the right tools, is as important as the design and implementation phases when it comes to embracing 3DIC technology.

John Ferguson of Mentor Graphics later said there is “an infrastructure problem” in the semiconductor industry when it comes to process design kits (PDKs) for 2.5D and 3D chips. Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing has collaborated with Mentor and other leading suppliers of electronic design automation tools to offer PDKs to TSMC foundry customers, yet the next step must be taken to have outsourced semiconductor assembly and test contractors provide packaging PDKs.

Phil Garrou, a senior consultant for Yole Developpement, said 2014 has witnessed significant progress in implementation of 3DIC technology. “We no longer need to prove performance,” he said. “The remaining issue is cost.”

Several speakers addressed the topic of the Internet of Things and how it involves 3DICs on the first day of the conference. Steven Schulz of the Silicon Integration Initiative (Si2) said 3D chip designers should think of their products not as system-on-a-chip devices, but system-on-a-stack.

Yole’s Rozalia Beica said predictions that the Internet of Things market will be worth trillions of dollars in 2022 are “overoptimistic” and that “optimism is higher than current investment.” Yole looks for the market in IoT sensors to be worth $400 billion in 2024, she said.

Samta Bonsal of the GE Software Center spoke on the Industrial Internet. “That world is huge,” she said, and predicted it will have “a bigger impact” than consumer-oriented IoT applications. Gartner says the market for all IoT chips will be worth $7.58 billion in 2015, she noted. The market research firm also forecasts that 8 billion connected devices will be shipped during 2020, encompassing 35 billion semiconductor devices produced on 6 million wafers.

E. Jan Vardaman of TechSearch International presented a lively review of 3DIC technology, past and present. “There’s been a lot of good progress with TSV (through-silicon vias), enabling us to improve the process,” she said. Still, 3DIC has been a long time in coming, noting that Micron Technology began research and development on DRAM stacking a dozen years ago and Xilinx initiated development of a silicon-based interposer to be used with TSVs in 2006, six years before it was able to offer a field-programmable gate array with such technology, manufactured in volume by TSMC.

Dyi-Chung Hu of Unimicron looked past the silicon interposer to the era to using glass for interposers and substrate core materials. Glass has a low coefficient of thermal expansion compared with silicon, he noted, and is very flat. Its chief drawback is its brittleness, according to Hu.

Michael Gaynes of IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center reported on his company’s two ICECool projects for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, developing 3DICs that could run cooler in data-center servers.

The last day of the conference coincided with a convention devoted to the Star Trek television series in the adjacent hotel ballroom. Attendees dressed as Klingons and starship crew members mingled with the 3DIC technologists in the hotel lobby, all dreaming and thinking about the future.

3D memory for future nanoelectronic systems

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014


By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

The future of 3D memory will be in application-specific packages and systems. That is how innovation continues when simple 2D scaling reaches atomic-limits, and deep work on applications is now part of what global research and development (R&D) consortium Imec does. Imec is now 30 years old, and the annual Imec Technology Forum held in the first week of June in Brussels, Belgium included fun birthday celebrations and very serious discussions of the detailed R&D needed to push nanoelectronics systems into health-care, energy, and communications markets.

3D memory will generally cost more than 2D memory, so generally a system must demand high speed or small size to mandate 3D. Communications devices and cloud servers need high speed memory. Mobile and portable personalized health monitors need low power memory. In most cases, the optimum solution does not necessarily need more bits, but perhaps faster bits or more reliable bits. This is why the Hybrid Memory Cube (HMC) provides >160Gb/sec data transfer with Through-Silicon Vias (TSV) through 3D stacked DRAM layers.

“We’re not adding 70-80% more bits like we used to per generation, or even the 40% recently,” explained Mark Durcan, chief executive officer of Micron Technology. “DRAM bits will only grow at the low to mid-20%.” With those numbers come hopes of more stability and less volatility in the DRAM business. Likewise, despite the bit growth rates of the recent past, NAND is moving to 30-40%  bit-increase per new ‘generation.’

“Moore’s Law is not over, it’s just slowing,” declared Durcan. “With NAND, we’re moving from planar to 3D, and the innovation is that there are different ways of doing 3D.” Figure 1 shows the six different options that Micron defines for 3D NAND. Micron plans for future success in the memory business to be not just about bit-growth, but about application-specific memory solutions.

Fig. 1: Different options for Vertical NAND (VNAND) Flash memory design, showing cell layouts and key specifications. (Source: Micron Technology)

E. S. Jung, executive vice president Samsung Electronics, presented an overview of how “Samsung’s Breaking the Limits of Semiconductor Technology for the Future” at the Imec forum. Samsung Semiconductor announced it’s first DRAM product in 1984, and has been improving it’s capabilities in design and manufacturing ever since. Samsung also sees the future of memory chips as part of application-specific systems, and suggests that all of the innovation in end-products we envision for the future cannot occur without semiconductor memory.

Samsung’s world leading 3D vertical-NAND (VNAND) chips are based on simultaneous innovation in three different aspects of materials and design:

1)    Material changed from floating-gate,

2)    Rotated structure from horizontal to vertical (and use Gate All Around), and

3)    Stacked layers.

To accomplish these results, partners were needed from OEM and specialty-materials suppliers during the R&D of the special new hard-mask process needed to be able to form 2.5B vias with extremely high aspect-ratios.

Rick Gottscho, executive vice president of the global products group Lam Research Corp., in an exclusive interview with SST/SemiMD, explained that with proper control of hardmask deposition and etch processes the inherent line-edge-roughness (LER) of photoresist (PR) can be reduced. This sort of integrated process module can be developed independently by an OEM like Lam Research, but proving it in a device structure with other complex materials interactions requires collaboration with other leading researchers, and so Lam Research is now part of a new ‘Supplier Hub’ relationship at Imec.

Luc Van den hove, president and chief executive officer of Imec, commented, “we have been working with equipment and materials suppliers form the beginning, but we’re upgrading into this new ‘Supplier Hub.’ In the past most of the development occurred at the suppliers’ facilities and then results moved to Imec. Last year we announced a new joint ‘patterning center’ with ASML, and they’re transferring about one hundred people from Leuven. Today we announced a major collaboration with Lam Research. This is not a new relationship, since we’ve been working with Lam for over 20 years, but we’re stepping it up to a new level.”

Commitment, competence, and compromise are all vital to functional collaboration according to Aart J. de Geus, chairman and co-chief executive officer of Synopsys. Since he has long lead a major electronic design automation (EDA) company, de Geus has seen electronics industry trends over the 30 years that Imec has been running. Today’s advanced systems designs require coordination among many different players within the electronics industry ecosystem (Figure 2), with EDA and manufacturing R&D holding the center of innovation.

Fig. 2: Semiconductor manufacturing and design drive technology innovation throughout the global electronics industry. (Source: Synopsys)

“The complexity of what is being built is so high that the guarantee that what has been built will work is a challenge,” cautioned de Geus. Complexity in systems is a multiplicative function of the number of components, not a simple summation. Consequently, design verification is the greatest challenge for complex System-on-Chips (SoC). Faster simulation has always been the way to speed up verification, and future hardware and software need co-optimization. “How do you debug this, because that is 70% of the design time today when working with SoCs containing re-used IP? This will be one of the limiters in terms of product schedules,” advised de Geus.

Whether HMC stacks of DRAM, VNAND, or newer memory technologies such as spintronics or Resistive RAM (RRAM), nanoscale electronic systems will use 3D memories to reduce volume and signal delays. “Today we’re investigating all of the technologies needed to advance IC manufacturing below 10nm,” said Van den hove. The future of 3D memories will be complex, but industry R&D collaboration is preparing the foundation to be able to build such complex structures.

DISCLAIMER:  Ed Korczynski has or had a consulting relationship with Lam Research.

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