Part of the  

Solid State Technology

  and   

The Confab

  Network

About  |  Contact

Posts Tagged ‘ITRI’

Linde Launches Asian R&D Center in Taiwan

Friday, September 23rd, 2016

thumbnail

By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

Timed in coordination with SEMICON Taiwan 2016 happening in early September, The Linde Group launched a new electronics R&D Center in Taichung, Taiwan. “We had a fabulous opening, with 35 to 40 customers and 20 people from the Taiwanese government such as ITRI,” said Carl Jackson (Fig. 1), Head of Electronics, Technology and Innovation at The Linde Group, in an exclusive interview with SemiMD. This new R&D center represents an investment of approximately EUR 5m to support local customers and development partners throughout the Asia Pacific region with its state-of-the-art analytical and product development laboratory.

FIG1: Carl Jackson, Head of Electronics, Technology and Innovation, LindeGroup. (Source: The Linde Group)

Linde has dozens of labs around the world supporting different industries, all of which work in coordination with three main centers termed ‘hubs’ located in New Jersey, Munich, and Shanghai. This new electronics lab in Taichung will support customers in China, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, and of course Taiwan. Working closely with local research partners and customers, the new center will also support development of local supply chains and local special gases manufacturing capabilities. “Customers do prefer a local supply-chain. There are examples in China where they’re even specifying a geographical limit around their fab, and if you’re outside that limit you can’t supply the materials,” said Jackson.

As a major step in collaborating with key regional partners in Taiwan, Linde is also entering into a collaboration agreement with the Industry Technology Research Institute (ITRI) of Taiwan. Jia-Ruey Duann, the vice president of ITRI, stated, “ ITRI values the cooperation on Electronic Specialty Gases (ESG) Production & Analysis with The Linde Group, and we look forward to working together to develop new products and services that benefit Taiwan’s electronics industry.”

Supporting Asia Pacific region

The R&D Center is part of an ongoing expansion and investment in the Asia Pacific region for Linde Electronics. Last year Linde commissioned the world’s largest on-site fluorine plant to supply SK Hynix, in addition to bringing multiple new electronics project on-stream in Asia. This year Linde announced that they have been awarded multiple gas and chemical supply wins for a number of world-leading photovoltaic cell manufacturers in Southeast Asia. “We’re talking about customer-specific applications in specific market segments,” explained Jackson. “They come to us with specific problems and the purpose of this lab is to find solutions.”

While this new lab supports manufacturing customers in LED, FPD, and PV industries, most of the demand for new materials comes from IC fabs. “Semiconductors always drive the materials focus, because it’s rare to find unique demands in the other markets,” said Jackson. “However, the scale can be much larger in the other segments, and that can drive improvements in gases used in semiconductor fabs. An example is ammonia which is used in huge volumes by LED fabs, and similarly when thin-film solar was happening there was huge demand for germane.”

Linde assists customers in realizing continuous technology progress through improvements in the ability to reduce chemical variability in existing products and in the development of new materials that are critical to support customers’ technology roadmaps. “We feel as thought we need to be better positioned to be able to support customers when they require it,” said Jackson. “Quite frankly, some materials don’t travel well. I’m not suggesting that suddenly we’ll start supplying everything locally, but this facility will help us start supplying customers throughout Asia.”

The Linde Electronics R&D Center (Fig. 2) will be used for improvement of product quality through advanced synthesis, purification, packaging and new applications development. These improvements are enabled by Linde’s advanced analytical processes and quality control systems that verify compositions and manage impurities.

FIG2: New electronics R&D center in Taichung, Taiwan will support customers throughout the Asia Pacific region. (Source: The Linde Group)

Analysis and Synthesis

“The way that we have it configured it has two distinct features that work together, but the main focus is on analysis and that’s where the main investment has been made,” explained Jackson. “We think that we probably have the most advanced lab in Asia and perhaps in the world. At least for the materials portfolio that we have we can do ‘finger-printing’ analysis, including all the trace-elements and all the metals, which is to say all the things that can potentially affect process.”

The second feature of this lab is the ability to create experimental quantities of completely new chemical and blends to meet the needs of customers working in advanced device R&D and in pilot-line production. The lab features new purification and new synthesis technologies that work on small quantities of materials. “One capability we have is to do binary- or mixed-component blends,” elaborated Jackson. “In terms of purification, we have a bench-scale set-up with absorbance and distillation, but generally that would be done somewhere else. That’s the advantage of being connected to the global network of labs.”

“There are unique requirements for every fab in every industry,” reminded Jackson. “For example, nitrous-oxide is a key critical-material for OLED manufacturing and you must maintain repeatability in every cylinder, in every truck, and down every pipe. How do you reduce the variability in the molecule regardless of the supply mode? Having the ability to do in-depth analysis certainly gives us a leg up.”

Since sustainability of the supply-chain is always essential, one trend is HVM fabs today is the consideration of recover methods for critical gases such as argon, helium, and neon. “In some cases it works, and particularly as the scale continues to grow. Being able to use the expertise from our Linde Engineering colleagues and scaling it to the right size for semiconductor manufacturing is really important for us.”

—E.K.

Measuring 5nm Particles In-Line

Monday, November 30th, 2015

By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) (https://www.itri.org.tw/) worked with TSMC (http://www.tsmc.com) in Taiwan on a clever in-line monitor technology that transforms liquids and automatically-diluted-slurries into aerosols for subsequent airborn measurements. They call this “SuperSizer” technology, and claim that tests have shown resolution over the astounding range of 5nm to 1 micron, and with ability to accurately represent size distributions over that range. Any dissolved gas bubbles in the liquid are lost in the aerosol process, which allows the tool to unambiguously count solid impurities. The Figure shows the compact components within the tool that produce the aerosol.

Aerosol sub-system inside “SuperSizer” in-line particle sizing tool co-developed by ITRI/TSMC. (Source: ITRI)

Semiconductor fabrication (fab) lines require in-line measurement and control of particles in critical liquids and slurries. With the exception of those carefully added to chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) slurries, most particles in fabs are accidental yield-killers that must be kept to an absolute minimum to ensure proper yield in IC fabs, and ever decreasing IC device feature sizes result in ever smaller particles that can kill a chip. Standard in-line tools to monitor particles rely on laser scattering through the liquid, and such technology allows for resolution of particle sizes as small as 40nm. Since we cannot control what we cannot measure, the IC fab industry needs this new ability to measure particles as small as 5nm for next-generation manufacturing.

There are two actual measurement technologies used downstream of the SuperSizer aerosol module:  a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), and a condensation particle counter (CPC). The aerosol first moves through the DMA column, where particle sizes are measured based on the force balance between air flow speed in the axial direction and an electric field in the radial direction. The subsequent CPC then provides particle concentration data.

Combining both data streams properly allows for automated output of information on particle sizes down to 5nm, size distributions, and impurity concentrations in liquids. Since the tool is intended for monitoring semiconductor high-volume manufacturing (HVM), the measurement data is automatically categorized, analyzed, and reported according to the needs of the fab’s automated yield management system. Users can edit the measurement sequences or recipes to monitor different chemicals or slurries under different conditions and schedules.

When used to control a CMP process, the SuperSizer can be configured to measure not just impurities but also the essential slurry particles themselves. During dilution and homogeneous mixing of the slurry prior to aerosolization, mechanical agitation needs to be avoided so as to prevent particle agglomeration which causes scratch defects. This new tool uses pressured gas as the driving force for solution transporting and mixing, so that any measured agglomeration in the slurry can be assigned to a source somewhere else in the fab.

TSMC has been using this tool since 2014 to measure particles in solutions including slurries, chemicals, and ultra-pure water. ITRI, which owns the technology and related patents, can now take orders to manufacture the product, but the research organization plans to license the technology to a company in Taiwan for volume manufacturing. EETimes reports (http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1328283) that the current list price for a tool capable of monitoring ultra-pure water is ~US$450k, while a fully-configured tool for CMP monitoring would cost over US$700k.

—E.K.

Low-Cost Manufacturing of Flexible Functionalities

Wednesday, July 15th, 2015

thumbnail

By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

SEMICON West includes many business and technology workshops and forums for attendees.  On Wednesday morning July 15, attendees packed the TechXPOT in the South Hall of Moscone Center to hear updates on the status of flexible hybrid electronics manufacturing.

M-H. Huang of Corning showed the surprising properties of “Corning Willow Glass: Substrates for flexible electronic devices.” Willow Glass is created in a fusion-forming process similar to that used to create Gorilla Glass, though with thickness <=200 microns to allow for flexibility. “A key advantage is hermeticity compared to plastic substrates,” reminded Huang. Thin bare glass without any edge or surface coatings can be repeatably bent and twisted without cracking. The minimum bending radius for roll-to-roll (R2R) processing is limited by coating layer delamination:  12.5mm for bare glass, 25mm for AZO-coated glass, and 50mm radius for CZTS cells on glass all passing 500 bending cycles at 60 cycles per minute. Working with the State University of New York at Binghamton Center for Advanced Microelectronic Manufacturing (CAMM), Corning has demonstrated R2R sputtering of Al, Cr/Cu, ITO, SiO2, and IGZO films. Collaborating with ITRI in Taiwan using tools designed specifically for processing flexible glass, Corning demonstrated R2R gravure-offset printing of metal mesh structures silver ink that can be used for 7” touch-panels. Working with both CAMM and ITRI has led to R&D fabrication of a touch sensor with 90% device yield.

Thomas Lantzer, of DuPont Electronic Materials, discussed the “Materials Supplier Perspective on Flexible Hybrid Electronics.” Since the overarching goal of flexible electronics is not just mass and volume reduction but a huge reduction in manufacturing cost, it is axiomatic that fabrication must evolving toward the use of traditional printing methods and flexible substrates.

“There are many printing techniques,” explained Lantzer, “So there are building blocks out there today that we feel will lead to an explosion of fabrication capabilities in the future.” DuPont has been actively involve in flexible materials and electronics for decades, supplying screen printed conductive pastes, resistor pastes for automotive defoggers, flexible films, and flexible materials for copper circuitry.

Mark Poliks, Professor at the State University of New York at Binghamton and Director of the Center for Advanced Microelectronic Manufacturing (CAMM), provided a comprehensive overview of “Materials, Processes & Tools for Fabrication of Flexible Hybrid Electronics.” Working with partners in the Nano-Bio Manufacturing Consortium since 2013, CAMM researchers are developing a wearable disposable sensor system with a target price of $2 to measure human performance parameters. The device including sensors, processor, battery, and wireless communications blocks will be built with copper (Cu) connections on flexible substrates such as polyimide. Initial functionalities will include biometric parameters such as electro-cardio-gram (ECG) signals and skin temperature. First prototypes of ECG sensors on 12.5 micron thin polyimide have been completed, which demonstrate output wave forms with equal or better signal extraction compared to industry standard silver/silver-chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrodes. This new printed sensor and breadboard electronics can be flexed over 200 times and retain the same signal quality and heart-beat extraction. The flexible substrate can accommodate assembly processes for flip-chip (FC) ASIC dice having micro-bumps on a 70 micron pitch, using die-placement accuracy of 9 microns (3 sigma). For flexible hybrid applications, dual-sided placement of components along with printed circuitry reduces the real estate of the final packaged device.