Part of the  

Solid State Technology

  and   

The Confab

  Network

About  |  Contact

Posts Tagged ‘Intel’

Next Page »

What’s the Next-Gen Litho Tech? Maybe All of Them

Thursday, February 25th, 2016

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

The annual SPIE Advanced Lithography symposium in San Jose, Calif., hasn’t offered a clear winner in the next-generation lithography race. It’s becoming clearer, however, that 193i immersion and extreme-ultraviolet lithography will co-exist in the future, while directed self-assembly, nanoimprint lithography, and maybe even electron-beam direct-write technology will fit into the picture, too.

At the same time, plasma deposition and etching processes are assuming a greater interdependence with 193i, especially when it comes to multiple patterning, such as self-aligned double patterning, self-aligned quadruple patterning, and self-aligned octuple patterning (yes, there is such a thing!).

“We’ve got to go down to the sub-nanometer level,” Richard Gottscho, Lam Research’s executive vice president of global products, said Monday morning in his plenary presentation at the conference. “We must reduce the variability in multiple patterning,” he added.

Gottscho touted the benefits of atomic level processing in continuing to shrink IC dimensions. Atomic level deposition has been in volume production for a decade or more, he noted, and atomic level etching is emerging as an increasingly useful technology.

When it comes to EUV, “it’s a matter of when, not if,” the Lam executive commented. “EUV will be complementary with 193i.”

Anthony Yen, director of nanopatterning technology in the Infrastructure Division of Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, followed Gottscho in the plenary session. “The fat lady hasn’t sung yet, but she’s on the stage,” he said of EUV.

Harry Levinson, senior director of GlobalFoundries, gave the opening plenary presentation, with the topic of “Evolution in the Concentration of Activities in Lithography.” He was asked after his presentation, “When is the end?” Levinson replied, “We’re definitely not going to get sub-atomic.”

With that limit in mind, dozens of papers were presented this week on what may happen before the semiconductor industry hits the sub-atomic wall.

There were seven conferences within the symposium, on specific subjects, along with a day of classes, an interactive poster session, and a two-day exhibition.

The Alternative Lithographic Technologies conference was heavy on directed self-assembly and nanoimprint lithography papers, while also offering glimpses at patterning with tilted ion implantation and multiphoton laser ablation lithography.

“Patterning is the battleground,” said David Fried, Coventor’s chief technology officer, semiconductor, in an interview at the SPIE conference. He described directed self-assembly as “an enabler for optical lithography.”

Mattan Kamon of Coventor presented a paper on Wednesday afternoon on “Virtual fabrication using directed self-assembly for process optimization in a 14nm DRAM node.”

DSA could be used in conjunction with SAQP or LELELELE, according to Fried. While some lithography experts remain leery or skeptical about using DSA in high-volume manufacturing, the Coventor CTO is a proponent of the technology’s potential.

“Unit process models in DSA are not far-fetched,” he said. “I think they’re pretty close.  The challenges of EUV are well understood. DSA challenges are a little less clear. There’s no ‘one solution fits all’ with DSA.” Fried added, “There are places where DSA can still win.”

Franklin Kalk, executive vice president of technology for Toppan Photomasks, is open to the idea of DSA and imprint lithography joining EUV and immersion in the lithography mix. “It will be some combination,” he said in an interview, while adding, “It’s a dog’s breakfast of technologies. Don’t ever count anything out.”

Richard Wise, Lam’s technical managing director in the company’s Patterning, Global Products Groups CTO Office, said EUV, when ready, will likely be complementary with multipatterning for 7 nanometer.

Self-aligning quadruple patterning, for example, was once considered “insanity” in the industry, yet it is a proven production technology now, he said.

While EUV technology is “very focused on one company,” ASML Holding, there is a consensus at SPIE that EUV’s moment is at hand, Wise said. Intel’s endorsement of the technology and dedication to advancing it speaks volumes of EUV’s potential, he asserted.

“Lam’s always excelled in lot-to-lot control,” an area of significant concern, Wise said, especially with all of this week’s talk about process variability.

What will be the final verdict on the future of lithography technology? Stay tuned.

Intel Posts Mixed Results for Q4, 2015

Friday, January 15th, 2016

thumbnail

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

Intel reported net income of $11.4 billion on revenue of $55.4 billion for the year ended December 26, compared with net of $11.7 billion on revenue of $55.9 billion in 2014.

For the fourth quarter, the world’s largest chipmaker measured by annual revenue posted net income of $3.6 billion on revenue of $14.9 billion, compared with $3.7 billion in net on revenue of $14.7 billion a year earlier.

Intel said revenue from the Client Computing Group, its PC chip business, was $8.8 billion, down 1 percent from a year ago. The Data Center Group was up 4 percent, year over year, to $4.3 billion.

The Internet of Things and Non-Volatile Memory Solution groups both showed revenue gains, of 8 percent and 10 percent, respectively.

“Our results for the fourth quarter marked a strong finish to the year and were consistent with expectations,” Intel CEO Brian Krzanich said in a statement. “Our 2015 results demonstrate that Intel is evolving and our strategy is working. This year, we’ll continue to drive growth by powering the infrastructure for an increasingly smart and connected world.”

Intel is forecasting revenue of $14 billion for the first quarter of 2016, with full-year revenue growing in middle-to-high single digits. Capital expenditures in 2016 will be flat with last year, at $9.5 billion.

The 2016 forecast does not account for the company’s recent acquisition of Altera, according to Intel.

InvenSense Developers Conference Tackles Sensor Security, New Technologies

Monday, November 23rd, 2015

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

The second day of the InvenSense Developers Conference saw presenters get down to cases – use cases for sensors.

There were track sessions devoted to mobile technology and the Internet of Things, with the latter featuring presentations on industrial and automotive applications, smart homes and drones, smartphones and tablet computers, and wearable electronics. InvenSense partner companies had their own track on New Technologies, fitting into the conference’s “Internet of Sensors” theme.

The conference also featured two developer tracks in parallel, providing five InvenSense presentations on its FireFly hardware and software, SensorStudio, and other offerings.

One of the presentations that wrapped up the conference on Wednesday afternoon (November 18) was given by Pim Tuyls, chief executive officer of Intrinsic-ID, the Dutch company that worked with InvenSense to develop the TrustedSensor product, a secure sensor-based authentication system incorporating the FireFly system-on-a-chip device.

TrustedSensor will be shipped to alpha customers in the first quarter of 2016 and will go out to beta customers in the second quarter of next year, according to Tuyls. “This is real,” he said.

The Intrinsic-ID founder briefly reviewed the company’s history, to start. It was spun out of Royal Philips in 2008 and is an independent company with venture-capital funding, Tuyls noted.

Intrinsic-ID was founded to provide “cyber physical security based on physically unclonable function,” or PUF, Tuyls said. “We invented PUF,” he added. “It has been vetted by security labs and government agencies,” among other parties.

Taking “The Trusted Sensor” as his theme, the Intrinsic-ID CEO said, “Sensors are the first line of defense. You want to make sure you can provide a certain level of security.”

It is critical to achieve “the right balance” in designing, fabricating, and installing sensors, with security, flexibility, and low footprint among the key considerations, according to Tuyls.

While whimsically describing PUF as “a magic concept,” Tuyls noted, “Chips are physically unique,” with no two completely alike due to manufacturing processes.

PUF can “extract a crypto key from any device,” he added. “You can authenticate any device.”

Intrinsic-ID has tested the PUF technology with a wide variety of silicon foundries, Tuyls said – namely, Cypress Semiconductor, GlobalFoundries, IBM, Intel, Renesas Electronics, Samsung Electronics, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, and United Microelectronics. It has been implemented by Altera, Microsemi, NXP Semiconductors, Samsung, and Synopsys, he added, and process nodes ranging from 180 nanometers down to 14nm have been tested.

Tuyls concluded by emphasizing the importance of sensor security for the Internet of Things. “We should not wait; we should not try to save a few cents,” he said. “It is important, but it is hard.”

Earlier in the day, attendees heard from Sam Massih, InvenSense’s director of wearable sensors. “There’s a wearable solution for every part of the body,” he commented.

“Step count isn’t enough,” Massih said. “You need context for data.” He cited the example of a user who goes to the gym three times a week and spends an hour on the elliptical trainer machine for one hour on each visit.

“That’s data that can be monetized,” he said.

InvenSense announced last month that it would enter the market for automotive sensors. Amir Panush, the company’s head of automotive and IoT industrial, said in his presentation, “Sensors need to be smart enough.”

The megatrends in automotive electronics include the use of motion sensors for safety in advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS), the smart connected car, and tough emission restrictions, according to Panush.

“We have signed a deal with a Tier One partner,” Panush said, meaning a leading automotive manufacturer, without identifying the company. “We are ramping up internal R&D in automotive.” InvenSense is presently opening design centers focusing on the $5 trillion automotive market, he added.

InvenSense was founded in 2003 and went public in 2011. The company posted revenue of $372 million in fiscal 2015 with a net loss of $1.08 million (primarily due to charging $10.55 million in interest expense against net income), after being profitable for the previous four years. InvenSense gets more than three-quarters of its revenue from mobile sensors and has a growing business in IoT sensors.

Customers in Asia accounted for 63 percent of the company’s fiscal 2015 revenue, according to InvenSense’s 10-K annual report. The company spent $90.6 million on research and development, representing about 24 percent of its net revenue.

GlobalFoundries and TSMC make nearly all of InvenSense’s wafers. Assembly packaging of its microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices and sensors is outsourced to Advanced Semiconductor Engineering, Amkor Technology, Lingsen Precision Industries, and Siliconware Precision Industries.

The company had 644 employees as of March 29, 2015, with nearly half of them involved in R&D.

STMicroelectronics is InvenSense’s primary competitor for consumer motion sensors, the 10-K states, while the company also competes with Analog Devices, Epson Toyocom, Kionix, Knowles, Maxim Integrated Products, MEMSIC, Murata Manufacturing, Panasonic, Robert Bosch, and Sony.

Wally Rhines of Mentor Graphics Gets Phil Kaufman Award

Monday, November 16th, 2015

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

There was a celebrity roast on 4th Street in San Jose, Calif., on Thursday night.

The occasion was the presentation of the annual Phil Kaufman Award to Wally Rhines, chairman and chief executive officer of Mentor Graphics, for his contributions in the field of electronic design automation. Dr. Rhines has served as Mentor’s CEO since 1993 and as chairman of the EDA software and services company since 2000.

The Phil Kaufman Award is presented by the Electronic Design Automation Consortium (EDAC) and the IEEE Council on Electronic Design Automation (CEDA). It honors the memory of Philip A. Kaufman, the EDA industry pioneer, electronics engineer, and entrepreneur, who died in 1992.

Rhines received some gentle ribbing from Craig Barrett, the former Intel chairman and CEO, who once was a Stanford University professor and served on the advisory panel for Rhines’ doctoral thesis.

Barrett said of Rhines, who was a top chip executive at Texas Instruments prior to joining Mentor, “We competed for about 20 years, which is probably why he went to Mentor Graphics.”

He added, “His hairline is receding faster than mine.”

The retired Intel executive later said Rhines’ career has been “fantastic,” adding, “He certainly exceeded all our expectations. You done good, man. Keep it up.”

A video shown before the formal presentation offered Barrett and other top executives showering accolades on Rhines, who turned 69 years old on Wednesday, November 11. Among those praising Rhines were Aart de Geus, chairman and co-CEO of Synopsys, and Lip-Bu Tan, president and CEO of Cadence Design Systems – business rivals and friends.

“He’s actually a cool cat,” de Geus said of Rhines in the video.

In his remarks, Rhines returned the favor to those praising him, saying of de Geus and Tan, “We’ve had enjoyable interactions.

“I’m particularly gratified that my professor, Craig Barrett, came here for my roast,” he said. “He willingly paid for the beer at The Oasis in Menlo Park.”

On a more serious note, Rhines said of Barrett, “He was very critical to my success.”

Rhines recalled the days when chip designers used rubylith sheets to lay out integrated circuits. “We evolved an industry,” he commented. While IC design and layout has become highly automated with EDA software, system design in many industries remains in the rubylith era, Rhines said. He called for a movement to “automate system design the way we automated electronic design.”

The evening drew to a close with a spoof video depicting Rhines as not only a visionary leader in EDA, but also as a race-car mechanic, a sushi chef, and a hair stylist. A good time was had by all.

IoT Security, Software Are Highlighted at ARM TechCon

Friday, November 13th, 2015

thumbnail

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

Many people are aware of the Internet of Things concept. What they want to know now is how to secure the IoT and how to develop code for it.

Plenty of vendors on hand for the ARM TechCon conference and exposition in Santa Clara, Calif. this week were offering solutions on both counts. And there were multiple presentations in the three-day conference program devoted to both subjects.

Mentor Graphics, for instance, spoke about “Use Cases for ARM TrustZone Benefits of HW-Enforced Partitioning and OS Separation.” MediaTek presented on “Secured Communication Between Devices and Clouds with LinkIt ONE and mbedTLS.” And so on.

ARM CEO Simon Segars said in his keynote address that security and trust are one of the key principles in the Internet of Things (the others being connectivity and partnership across the ecosystem). Security and trust, he asserted, must be “at every level baked into the hardware, before you start layering software on top.”

James Bruce, ARM’s director of mobile solutions, addressed the security topic at length in an interview at the conference. ARM is taking a holistic approach to security through its TrustZone technology, he said, describing it as “a great place to put [network] keys.”

With microcontrollers, the chips often used in IoT devices, TrustZone makes sure sensitive data is “inaccessible to normal software,” Bruce said. At the same time, “you want to make devices easy to update,” he added.

ARM wants to enable its worldwide ecosystem of partners to stay ahead of cyberattacks and other online dangers, according to Bruce. “That’s why we’re doing the groundwork now,” he said.

The reaction of ARM partners to the introduction of TrustZone CryptoCells and the new ARMv8-M architecture for embedded devices has been “very positive,” Bruce said, adding, “Security can’t be an afterthought.”

Ron Ih, senior manager of marketing and business development in the Security Products Group at Atmel, described standard encryption as “only a piece” of security measures. “Authentication is a key part,” he said.

Atmel was touting its Certified-ID platform at ARM TechCon, featuring the ATECC508A cryptographic co-processor. Ih cited the “made for iPhone” chips that Apple requires of its partners developing products to complement the smartphone, ensuring ecosystem control. “You either have the chip or you don’t,” he said.

“People don’t care about the devices,” Ih concluded. “They care about who the devices are connected to.”

Simon Davidmann, president and chief executive officer of Imperas Software, is a veteran of the electronic design automation field, and he brings his experience to bear in the area of embedded software development.

Software, especially for the IoT, is “getting so complex, you can’t do what you used to do,” he said. “The software world has to change. Nobody should build software without simulation.”

At the same time, simulation is “necessary but not sufficient” in software development, he said. Code developers should be paying attention to abstractions, assertions, verification, and other aspects, according to Davidmann.

“Our customers are starting to adopt virtual platforms,” he added.

Jean Labrosse, president and CEO of MIcrium, a leading provider of real-time operating system kernels and other software components, said “the industry is changing” with the onset of the Internet of Things. Multiple-core chips are entering into the mix – not only for their low-power attributes, but for the safety and security they can provide, he noted.

Jeffrey Fortin, director of product management at Wind River and a specialist in IoT platforms, spoke on the last day of the conference on “Designing for the Internet of Things: The Technology Behind the Hype.”

Wind River, now an Intel subsidiary, has been around for more than three decades, developing “an embedded operating system that could be connected to other systems,” he said.

There are two business interests driving IoT demand, according to Fortin – business optimization and business transformation. He described the IoT as “using data to feed actionable analytics.”

The foundation of the IoT is hardware and software that provides safety and security, Fortin said.

Colt McAnlis of Google (Photo by Jeff Dorsch)

In the final keynote of ARM TechCon, Google developer advocate Colt McAnlis spoke on “The Hard Things About the Internet of Things.”

IoT technology, at present, is “not optimizing the user,” he said in a frequently funny and witty presentation. Networking and battery issues are bedeviling the IoT ecosystem, he asserted.

By draining the batteries of mobile devices with near-constant signals, such as setting location via GPS, companies are imposing “a taxation system for every single thing [IoT] does,” McAnlis said. “We’re talking about how often we’re sampling. People are already realizing this sucks.”

Beacons installed in a shopping mall can bombard smartphone users with advertising and coupons, he noted, while the property management gets data on specifics of foot traffic. “Imagine this at scale,” installed on every block of San Francisco, he added.

“We have a chance to not make this a reality,” McAnlis asserted. “We need IoT technology to make this not suck for users.”

At the end of his keynote, McAnlis asked the attendees to hold up their smartphones and vow, “I solemnly agree not to screw this up.”

Solid State Technology: August 7-14, 2015

Monday, August 24th, 2015
YouTube Preview Image

Solid State Watch: July 31-August 6, 2015

Friday, August 7th, 2015
YouTube Preview Image

Intel CEO looks to 3D tech at display conference

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

thumbnail

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich touted the capabilities of his company’s RealSense technology in a keynote address today at the Society for Information Display conference in San Jose, California.

In the five decades of Moore’s Law, named for the Intel co-founder, “computing has really had one trajectory,” Krzanich said – smaller, more personal, and more connected.

With the advent of wearable gadgets, implemented with Intel’s Curie module, “personal is at a new level,” he noted. “Displays are more personal and more connected.”

The devices of today, such as smartphones and tablet computers, “are dumb displays,” he asserted. “Everything you do is flat.”

While the advent of touch displays has freed users from computer mice and keyboards, the display remains “2D, flat,” Krzanich noted.

The next step is to make computers able to “see and hear like a human,” he said. “For humans, everything is 3D.”

He added, “That future is not too far off.”

Speech recognition has been in development for some time and has demonstrably advanced, Krzanich said. “When you can hear but not see, you’re only halfway there,” he added.

The Intel chief then held up a RealSense module, which is 3.75 millimeters in thickness. It can be embedded in the top bezel of a laptop computer, among other applications, he noted.

Intel is making its RealSense software development kit available at intel.com/realsense, and “all of these APIs are free,” Krzanich said.

The chip company has been working with such companies as Disney, Lego, and Food Network to develop RealSense applications, he added.

“RealSense cameras enable a new video experience, a much more immersive experience,” Krzanich said. “The computer starts to see the world as you and I do.”

Moving beyond consumer applications, Intel is now working on industrial and professional apps, according to Krzanich.

He demonstrated how a device with a RealSense camera could complete a three-dimensional scan of his body in about 30 seconds, and showed off a bust of himself made with a 3D printer.

This was followed by a demonstration of putting a virtual Brian Krzanich into a video game, where the figure ran and did handsprings and backflips. “If only I could do this in real life,” he joked.

Krzanich also demonstrated how RealSense can work with augmented reality, repeating a demo done at the International Consumer Electronics Show in January, where a virtual piano appeared in mid-air and could be played. With some help, he showed how a virtual secondary screen could materialize in mid-air and could employ AR for a variety of applications.

Krzanich appealed to the keynote attendees to take advantage of the free RealSense SDK.

“We want you to create something bigger and better,” he concluded. “We need help.”

Solid State Watch: May 1-8, 2015

Tuesday, May 12th, 2015
YouTube Preview Image

Solid State Watch: March 20-26, 2015

Thursday, March 26th, 2015
YouTube Preview Image
Next Page »