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Posts Tagged ‘IITC’

Solid State Watch: May 16-22, 2014

Friday, May 23rd, 2014
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Research Alert: May 20, 2014

Tuesday, May 20th, 2014

Lighting the way to graphene-based devices

Researchers with Berkeley Lab and the University of California (UC) Berkeley have demonstrated a technique whereby the electronic properties of GBN heterostructures can be modified with visible light. Feng Wang, a condensed matter physicist with Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division and UC Berkeley’s Physics Department, as well as an investigator for the Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, led a study in which photo-induced doping of GBN heterostructures was used to create p–n junctions and other useful doping profiles while preserving the material’s remarkably high electron mobility.

“We’ve demonstrated that visible light can induce a robust writing and erasing of charge-doping in GBN heterostructures without sacrificing high carrier mobility,” Wang says. “The use of visible light gives us incredible flexibility and, unlike electrostatic gating and chemical doping, does not require multi-step fabrication processes that reduce sample quality. Additionally, different patterns can be imparted and erased at will, which was not possible with doping techniques previously used on GBN heterostructures.”

“We’ve shown show that this photo-induced doping arises from microscopically coupled optical and electrical responses in the GBN heterostructures, including optical excitation of defect transitions in boron nitride, electrical transport in graphene, and charge transfer between boron nitride and graphene,” Wang says. “This is analogous to the modulation doping first developed for high-quality semiconductors.”

While the photo-induced modulation doping of GBN heterostructures only lasted a few days if the sample was kept in darkness – further exposure to light erased the effect – this is not a concern as Wang explains.

“A few days of modulation doping are sufficient for many avenues of scientific inquiry, and for some device applications, the rewritability we can provide is needed more than long term stability,” he says. “For the moment, what we have is a simple technique for inhomogeneous doping in a high-mobility graphene material that opens the door to novel scientific studies and applications.”

SMIC and other groups collaborate to setup the “IC Advanced Technology Research Institute”

China’s largest and most advanced semiconductor foundry this week announced that SMIC, Wuhan Xinxin, Tsinghua University, Beijing University, Fudan University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Microelectronics have collaborated to setup the “IC Advanced Technology Research Institute” to create the most advanced IC technology research and development institution in China.

Currently, the research institute will focus on the mainstream 20nm and below technologies for research and development which includes advanced logic technology, advanced non-volatile memory technology, verification of domestic equipment and materials, and related IP qualifications etc. It will also follow up with the industry’s technology development and the actual needs of the customers, and will invite design, equipment, material companies, and upstream and downstream industries. They can join in as a member or in project collaboration. This institute will strengthen its international exchange and cooperation, to promote the establishment our IP infrastructure, to speed up the cultivation of patents and talent, in order to raise the core competitiveness of innovation in China’s IC industry.

On Solid State Technology: What to look for at IITC

Are you at IITC this week? Here’s a look at the key presentations being given and topics being covered all week at the 17th annual IITC/AMC conference in San Jose, California.

Blog review April 22, 2014

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

Pete Singer blogs that it’s difficult to make interconnects much smaller without introducing significant increases in resistivity. At the upcoming IITC/AMC joint conference in May, many papers focus on new materials that could lead to reduced resistivity and enable further interconnect scaling. Most notably, graphene and CNTs provide an interesting alternative to copper.

Phil Garrou continues his analysis of the IMAPS Device Packaging Conference with a look at the presentations made by Flip Chip International and SUSS (the use of lasers in the manufacturing of WLP); GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Amkor and Open Silicon (a 2.5D ARM dual core product demonstrator which consists of 2 ARM die on a high density silicon interposer); Corning (results of multiple glass interposer programs) and Namics (underfill products for FC BGA and FC CSP).