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Posts Tagged ‘FDSOI’

Silicon Summit speakers look at the future of chip technology

Friday, April 17th, 2015
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Gregg Bartlett

By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

Quick quiz: What topics do you think were discussed at length Wednesday at the Global Semiconductor Alliance’s Silicon Summit?

A. The Internet of Things.

B. Augmented reality and virtual reality.

C. Cute accessories for spring and summer looks.

The answers: A and B. C could be right if you count wearable electronics as “cute accessories.”

Wednesday’s forum at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif., not far from  Google’s headquarters, was dominated by talk of IoT, AR, VR, and (to a lesser extent) wearable devices.

Gregg Bartlett, senior vice president of the Product Management Group at GlobalFoundries, kicked off the morning sessions with a talk titled “IoT: A Silicon Perspective.” He said, “A lot of the work left in IoT is in the edge world.”

Bartlett noted, “A lot of the infrastructure is in place,” yet the lack of IoT standards is inhibiting development, he asserted.

“IoT demands the continuation of Moore’s Law,” Bartlett said, touting fully-depleted silicon-on-insulator technology as a cost-effective alternative to FinFET technology. FD-SOI “is the killer technology for IoT,” he added.

Next up was James Stansberry, senior vice president and general manager of IoT Products at Silicon Laboratories. Energy efficiency is crucial for IoT-related devices, which must be able to operate for 10 years with little or no external power, he said.

Bluetooth Smart, Thread, Wi-Fi, and ZigBee provide the connectivity in IoT networks, with a future role for Long-Term Evolution, according to Stansberry. He also played up the importance of integration in connected devices. “Nonvolatile memory has to go on the chip” for an IoT system-on-a-chip device, he said.

For 2015, Stansberry predicted a dramatic reduction in energy consumption for IoT devices; low-power connectivity standards will gain traction; and the emergence of more IoT SoCs.

Rahul Patel, Broadcom’s senior vice president and general manager of wireless connectivity, addressed health-care applications for the IoT. “Security is key,” he said. Reliability, interoperability, and compliance with government regulations are also required, Patel noted.

“My agenda is to scare everyone to death,” said Martin Scott, senior vice president and general manager of the Cryptography Research Division at Rambus. Cybersecurity with the IoT is causing much anxiety, he noted. “Silicon can come to the rescue again,” he said. “If your system relies on software, it’s hackable.”

To build trust in IoT devices and networks, the industry needs to turn to silicon-based security, according to Scott. “Silicon is the foundation of trusted services,” he concluded.

The second morning session was titled “The Future of Reality,” with presentations by Keith Witek, corporate vice president, Office of Corporate Strategy, Advanced Micro Devices; Mats Johansson, CEO of EON Reality; and Joerg Tewes, CEO of Avegant.

Augmented reality and virtual reality technology is “incredibly exciting,” Witek said. “I love this business.” He outlined four technical challenges for VR in the near future: Improving performance; ensuring low latency of images; high-quality consistency of media; and system-level advances. “Wireless has to improve,” Witek said.

VR is “starting to become a volume market,” Johansson said. What matters now is proceeding “from phone to dome,” where immersive experiences meet knowledge transfer, he added. Superdata, a market research firm, estimates there will be 11 million VR users by next year, according to Johansson.

Avegant had a successful Kickstarter campaign last year to fund its Glyph VR headset, with product delivery expected in late 2015, Tewes said. The Glyph has been in development for three years, he said, employing digital micromirror device technology, low-power light-emitting diodes, and latency of less than 12 microseconds to reduce or eliminate the nausea that some VR users have experienced, he said.

The afternoon session was devoted to “MEMS and Sensors, Shaping the Future of the IoT.” Attendees heard from Todd Miller, Microsystems Lab Manager at GE Global Research; Behrooz Abdi, president and CEO of InvenSense; Steve Pancoast, Atmel’s vice president of software and applications; and David Allan, president and chief operating officer of Virtuix.

Miller outlined the challenges for the industrial Internet – cybersecurity, interoperability, performance, and scale. “Open standards need to continue,” he said.

General Electric and other companies, including Intel, are involved in the Industrial Internet Consortium, which is developing use cases and test beds in the area, according to Miller.

He noted that GE plans to begin shipping its microelectromechanical system devices to external customers in the fourth quarter of this year.

Abdi said, “What is the thing in the Internet of Things? The IoT is really about ambient computing.” IoT sensors must continuously answer these questions: Where are you, what are you doing, and how does it feel, he said.

The IoT will depend upon “always on” sensors, making it more accurate to call the technology “the Internet of Sensors,” Abdi asserted. He cautioned against semiconductor suppliers getting too giddy about business prospects for the IoT.

“You’re not going to sell one billion sensors for a buck [each],” Abdi said.

Pancoast of Atmel said sensors would help provide “contextual computing” in IoT networks. “Edge/sensing nodes are a major part of IoT,” he noted. Low-power microcontrollers and microprocessors are also part of the equation, along with “an ocean of software” and all IoT applications, Pancoast added. He finished with saying, “All software is vulnerable.”

Allan spoke about what he called “the second machine age,” with the first machine age dating to 1945, marking the advent of the stored-program computer and other advances. “The smartphone is the first machine of the second machine age,” he said.

IoT involves wireless sensor networks and distributed computing, he said. Google has pointed the way over the past decade, showing how less-powerful computers, implemented in large volumes, have become the critical development in computing, Allan noted. Because of this ubiquity of distributed computing capabilities, “Moore’s Law doesn’t matter as much,” he said.

With the IoT, “new machines will augment human desires,” Allan predicted, facilitating such concepts as immortality, omniscience, telepathy, and teleportation. He explained how technology has helped along the first three – we know what people are thinking through Facebook and Twitter – and the last is just a matter of time, according to Allan.

Blog review June 16, 2014

Monday, June 16th, 2014

An upcoming webcast will focus on The Rise of MEMS Sensors. Jay Esfandyari from STMicroelectronics will talk about how the introduction of MEMS technology into consumer markets has opened the floodgates with multiple MEMS – accelerometers, gyros, compasses, pressure sensors and microphones – in games such as the Wii and now in smartphones and tablets. Simone Severi from imec will Next, Simone Severi, lead for SiGe MEMS at imec, will discuss SiGe MEMS technology for monolithic integration on CMOS.

The Synopsys’ Galaxy Design Platform has been extended to support the Samsung-STMicroelectronics strategic agreement on 28nm FD-SOI. Adele Hars blogs that they’ve covered all the bases, so that designers going to Samsung’s foundry services for ST’s 28nm FD-SOI can hit the ground running.

Phil Garrou reports on the 16th biennial Symposium on Polymers, which was held this May in Wilmington DE. In this blog post, he analyzes presentations from Fraunhofer IZM, ASE and Hitachi Chemicals.

Jamie Girard, senior director, Public Policy, SEMI North America, blogs that with changes coming in Washington, SEMI has important work ahead supporting the innovators and job creators of this country. Advancing the goals of its members, SEMI advocates legislation in congress, targeting passage of the Commerce, Justice and Science Appropriations Act, increases to NSF and NIST funding and changes to R&D tax credits.

Zvi Or-Bach, President and CEO of MonolithIC 3D Inc. blogs that over the course of three major industry conferences (VLSI 2013, IEDM 2013 and DAC 2014), executives of Qualcomm voiced a call for monolithic 3D “to extend the semiconductor roadmap way beyond the 2D scaling” as part of their keynote presentations.

Prakash Arunkundrum, PwC Strategy and Operations Consulting Director blogs about improving financial predictability. He notes that there is continued evidence that despite spending several millions on IT transformations, improving internal planning processes, maturing supply chains, and streamlining product development processes, several companies still struggle with predicting their financial and operational performance.

Blog review June 2, 2014

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

The Internet of Things alone will surpass the PC, tablet and phone market combined by 2017, with a global internet device installed base of around 7,500,000,000 devices. Speaking at ASMC, TSMC’s John Lin said in addition to a continued push to smaller geometries and ultra-low power, the company will focus on “special” technologies such as image sensor, embedded DRAMs, high-voltage power ICs, RF, analog, and embedded flash. “All this will support all of the future Internet of Things,” he said.

Kavita Shah of Applied Materials blogs about the company’s new Volta system. She says desighed to alleviate roadblocks to copper interconnect scaling beyond the 2Xnm node through two enabling applications—a conformal cobalt liner and a selective cobalt capping layer, which together completely encapsulate the copper wiring.

In an interview, Christophe Maleville, Senior Vice President of Soitec’s Microelectronics Business Unit, talks about why FD-SOI provides a much better combination of power consumption, performance and cost than any alternative. Talking about Samsung’s move to FDSOI, he said “at 28nm, FD-SOI gets them an unprecedented combination of performance and power consumption for a cost comparable to that of standard low-power 28nm technology, making 28FD an extremely attractive alternative to any flavor of bulk CMOS at this node.”

Phil Garrou continues his analysis of presentations from the recent SEMI 2.5/3D IC forum in Singapore. In his third blog post on the topic, he reviews Nanium’s presentation “Wafer Level Fan-Out as Fine-Pitch Interposer” which focused on the premise that FO-WLP technology, eWLB, has closed the gap caused by the delay in the introduction of Si or glass interposers as mainstream high volume commodity technology.

Vivek Bakshi blogs that it takes a large infrastructure to make EUVL a manufacturing technology. So many tool suppliers, large and small, want to know when EUVL will be inserted into fabs for production and how and how much it will be used. Their business depends on these answers and some, especially smaller suppliers, are getting cold feet as delays in EUVL readiness continue. The answers to these questions mostly depend on knowing what we can expect from sources in the short- and near term, but there are many additional questions one must ask as well.

Karen Lightman of the MEMS Industry Group blogs about recent events in Japan, including the MIG Conference Japan. The focus of the conference was on navigating the challenges of the global MEMS supply chain. Several of the speakers gave their no-holds-barred view of these challenges, including the keynote from Sony Communications, Takeshi Ito, Chief Technology Officer, Head of Technology, Sony Mobile Communications.

Blog review March 31, 2014

Monday, March 31st, 2014

Ofer Adan of Applied Materials blogs about his keynote presentation at the recent SPIE Advanced Lithography conference, which focused on how improvements in metrology, multi-patterning techniques and materials can enable 3D memory and the critical dimension (CD) scaling of device designs to sub-10nm nodes.

Soitec’s Bich-Yen Nguyen and Christophe Maleville detail why the fully-depleted SOI device/circuit is a unique option that can satisfy all the requirements of smart handheld devices and remote data storage “in the cloud.” Devices that are almost always on and driven by needs of high data transmission rate, instant access/connection and long battery life. Demonstrated benefits of FDSOI, including simpler fabrication and scalability are covered.

This year’s IMAPS Device Packaging Conference in Ft McDowell, AZ had a series of excellent keynote talks. Phil Garrou takes a look at some of those and several key presentations from the conference. Steve Bezuk, Sr. Dir. of Package Engineering for Qualcomm discussed “challenges and directions in mobile device packaging”. Qualcomm expects 7 billion smartphone units to be shipped between 2012 and 2017.

Karen Lightman of the MEMS Industry Group writes about the recent MEMS Executive Congress Europe 2014. She describes how every panelist shared not only the “everything’s-coming-up-MEMS” perspective but also some real honest discussion about the remaining challenges of getting MEMS devices to market on-time, and at (or below) cost.

Pete Singer shares some details of the upcoming R&D Panel Session at The ConFab this year. The session, to be moderated by Scott Jones of Alix Partners, will include panelists Rory McInerny of Intel, Chris Danely of JP Morgan, Mike Noonen of Silicon Catalyst and Lode Lauwers of imec.

Blog review March 24, 2014

Monday, March 24th, 2014

IBS has recently issued a new white paper entitled Why Migration to 20nm Bulk CMOS and 16/14nm FinFETs Is Not the Best Approach for the Semiconductor Industry. Handel Jones of IBM says the focus of the analysis is on technology options that can be used to give lower cost per gate and lower cost per transistor within the next 24 to 60 months, covering the 28nm, 20nm and 14/16nm nodes.

Sitaram Arkalgud of Invensas and Rich Rogoff of Rudolph Technologies will present this Thursday as part of a free webcast focused on 2.5/3D integration and advanced packaging, including and new lithography options. Sitaram, who formerly led the 3D charge at SEMATECH, is now the vp of 3D technology at Invensas and Rich is the vp and general manager of the lithography systems group at Rudolph.

Phil Garrou provides a delightful lecture to the packaging community on nomenclature. He says the word “lecture” is one of those wonderful English words with multiple meanings. Lecture can mean “a talk or speech given to a group of people to teach them about a particular subject,” but it can also mean “a talk that criticizes someone’s behavior in an angry or serious way.” In his latest blog, lecturing means both!

Blog review March 10, 2014

Monday, March 10th, 2014

Pete Singer is pleased to announce that IBM’s Dr. Gary Patton will provide the keynote talk at The ConFab on Tuesday, June 24th. Gary is Vice President of IBM’s Semiconductor Research and Development Center in East Fishkill, New York, and has responsibility for IBM’s semiconductor R&D roadmap, operations, and technology development alliances.

Nag Patibandla of Applied Materials describes a half-day workshop at Lawrence Berkeley Lab that assembled experts to discuss challenges and identify opportunities for collaboration in semiconductor manufacturing including EUV lithography, advanced etch techniques, compound semiconductors, energy storage and materials engineering.

Adele Hars of Advanced Substrate News reports on a presentation by ST’s Joël Hartmann (EVP of Manufacturing and Process R&D, Embedded Processing Solutions) during SEMI’s recent ISS Europe Symposium. FD-SOI is significantly cheaper, outdoes planar bulk and matches bulk FinFET in the performance/power ratio, and keeps the industry on track with Moore’s Law, she writes.

Phil Garrou reports on the RTI- Architectures for Semiconductor Integration & Packaging (ASIP) conference, which is focused on commercial 3DIC technology. Timed for release at RTI ASIP was the announcement that Novati had purchased the Ziptronix facility outside RTP NC. Tezzaron had been a licensee of the Ziptronix’s direct bonding technologies, ZiBond™ and DBI® and they now have control of the Ziptronix facility to serve as a second source for their processing. In addition Tezzaron’s Robert Patti announced that they were partnering with Invensas on 2.5 and 3DIC assembly.

Vivek Bakshi, EUV Litho, Inc., blogs that most of the papers at this year’s EUVL Conference during SPIE’s 2014 Advanced Lithography program focused on topics relating to EUVL’s entrance into high volume manufacturing (HVM).

On March 2, 2014 SIA announced that worldwide sales of semiconductors reached $26.3 billion for the month of January 2014, an increase of 8.8% from January 2013 when sales were $24.2 billion. After adding in semiconductor sales from excluded companies such as Apple and Sandisk, that total is even higher, marking the industry’s highest-ever January sales total and the largest year-to-year increase in nearly three years. These results are in-line with the Semico IPI index which has been projecting strong semiconductor revenue growth for the 1st and 2nd quarters of 2014.

Blog review February 24, 2014

Monday, February 24th, 2014

Paul Farrar, general manager of the G450C consortium, said early work has demonstrated good results and that he sees no real barriers to implementing 450mm wafers from a technical standpoint. But as Pete Singer blogs, he also said: “In the end, if this isn’t cheaper, no one is going to do it,” he said.

Adele Hars of Advanced Substrate News reports that body-biasing design techniques, uniquely available in FD-SOI, have allowed STMicroelectronics and CEA-Leti to demonstrate a DSP that runs 10x faster than anything the industry’s seen before at ultra-low voltages.

Dr. Bruce McGaughy, Chief Technology Officer and Senior Vice President of Engineering, ProPlus Design Solutions, Inc., says the move to state-of-the-art 28nm/20nm planar CMOS and 16nm FinFET technologies present greater challenges to yield than any previous generation. This is putting more emphasis on high sigma yield.

Jamie Girard, senior director, North America Public Policy, SEMI President Obama touched on many different policy areas during his State of the Union talk, and specifically mentioned a number of issues that are of top concern in the industry and with SEMI member companies. Among these are funding for federal R&D, including public-private partnerships, trade, high-skilled immigration reform, and solar energy.

Phil Garrou finishes his look at the IEEE 3DIC meeting, with an analysis of presentations from Tohoku University, Fujitsu’s wafer-on-wafer (WOW), ASE/Chiao Tung University and RTI. In another blog, Phil continues his review of the Georgia Tech Interposer conference, highlighting presentations from Corning, Schott Glass, Asahi Glass, Shinko, Altera, Zeon and Ushio.

Pete Singer recommends taking the new survey by the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) but you may first want to give some thought as to what is and what isn’t “nanotechnology.”