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D2S Releases 4th-Gen IC Computational Design Platform

Friday, September 30th, 2016


By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

D2S ( recently released the fourth generation of its computational design platform (CDP), which enables extremely fast (400 Teraflops) and precise simulations for semiconductor design and manufacturing. The new CDP is based on NVIDIA Tesla K80 GPUs and Intel Haswell CPUs, and is architected for 24×7 cleanroom production environments. To date, 14 CDPs across four platform generations are in use by customers around the globe, including six of the latest fourth generation. In an exclusive interview with SemiMD, D2S CEO Aki Fujimura stated, “Now that GPUs and CPUs are fast-enough, they can replace other hardware and thereby free up engineering resources to focus on adding value elsewhere.”

Mask data preparation (MDP) and other aspects of IC design and manufacturing require ever-increasing levels of speed and reliability as the data sets upon which they must operate grow larger and more complex with each device generation. The Figure shows a mask needed to print arrays of sub-wavelength features includes complex curvilinear shapes which must be precisely formed even though they do not print on the wafer. Such sub-resolution assist features (SRAF) increase in complexity and density as the half-pitch decreases, so the complexity of mask data increases far more than the density of printed features.

Sub-wavelength lithography using 193nm wavelength requires ever-more complex masks to repeatably print ever smaller half-pitch (HP) features, as shown by (LEFT) a typical mask composed of complex nested curves and dots which do not print (RIGHT) in the array of 32nm HP contacts/vias represented by the small red circles. (Source: D2S)

GPUs, which were first developed as processing engines for the complex graphical content of computer games, have since emerged as an attractive option for compute-intensive scientific applications due in part to their ability to run many more computing threads (up to 500x) compared to similar-generation CPUs. “Being able to process arbitrary shapes is something that mask shops will have to do,” explained Fujimura. “The world could go 193nm or EUV at any particular node, but either way there will be more features and higher complexity within the features, and all of that points to GPU acceleration.”

The D2S CDP is engineered for high reliability inside a cleanroom manufacturing environment. A few of the fab applications where CDPs are currently being used include:

  • model-based MDP for leading-edge designs that require increasingly complex mask shapes,
  • wafer plane analysis of SEM mask images to identify mask errors that print, and
  • inline thermal-effect correction of eBeam mask writers to lower write times.

“The amount of design data required to produce photomasks for leading-edge chip designs is increasing at an exponential rate, which puts more pressure on mask writing systems to maintain reasonable write times for these advanced masks. At the same time, writing these masks requires higher exposure doses and shot counts, which can cause resist proximity heating effects that lead to mask CD errors,” stated Noriaki Nakayamada, group manager at NuFlare Technology. “D2S GPU acceleration technology significantly reduces the calculation time required to correct these resist heating effects. By employing a resist heating correction that includes the use of the D2S CDP as an OEM option on our mask writers, NuFlare estimates that it can reduce CD errors by more than 60 percent, and reduce write times by more than 20 percent.”

In the E-beam Initiative 2015 survey, the most advanced reported mask-set contained >100 masks of which ~20% could be considered ‘critical’. The just released 2016 survey disclosed that the most complex single-layer mask design written last year required 16 TB of data, however platforms like D2S’ CDP have been used to accelerate writing such that the average reported write times have decreased to a weighted average of 4 hours. Meanwhile, the longest reported mask write time decreased from 72 to 48 hours.

Linde Launches Asian R&D Center in Taiwan

Friday, September 23rd, 2016


By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

Timed in coordination with SEMICON Taiwan 2016 happening in early September, The Linde Group launched a new electronics R&D Center in Taichung, Taiwan. “We had a fabulous opening, with 35 to 40 customers and 20 people from the Taiwanese government such as ITRI,” said Carl Jackson (Fig. 1), Head of Electronics, Technology and Innovation at The Linde Group, in an exclusive interview with SemiMD. This new R&D center represents an investment of approximately EUR 5m to support local customers and development partners throughout the Asia Pacific region with its state-of-the-art analytical and product development laboratory.

FIG1: Carl Jackson, Head of Electronics, Technology and Innovation, LindeGroup. (Source: The Linde Group)

Linde has dozens of labs around the world supporting different industries, all of which work in coordination with three main centers termed ‘hubs’ located in New Jersey, Munich, and Shanghai. This new electronics lab in Taichung will support customers in China, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, and of course Taiwan. Working closely with local research partners and customers, the new center will also support development of local supply chains and local special gases manufacturing capabilities. “Customers do prefer a local supply-chain. There are examples in China where they’re even specifying a geographical limit around their fab, and if you’re outside that limit you can’t supply the materials,” said Jackson.

As a major step in collaborating with key regional partners in Taiwan, Linde is also entering into a collaboration agreement with the Industry Technology Research Institute (ITRI) of Taiwan. Jia-Ruey Duann, the vice president of ITRI, stated, “ ITRI values the cooperation on Electronic Specialty Gases (ESG) Production & Analysis with The Linde Group, and we look forward to working together to develop new products and services that benefit Taiwan’s electronics industry.”

Supporting Asia Pacific region

The R&D Center is part of an ongoing expansion and investment in the Asia Pacific region for Linde Electronics. Last year Linde commissioned the world’s largest on-site fluorine plant to supply SK Hynix, in addition to bringing multiple new electronics project on-stream in Asia. This year Linde announced that they have been awarded multiple gas and chemical supply wins for a number of world-leading photovoltaic cell manufacturers in Southeast Asia. “We’re talking about customer-specific applications in specific market segments,” explained Jackson. “They come to us with specific problems and the purpose of this lab is to find solutions.”

While this new lab supports manufacturing customers in LED, FPD, and PV industries, most of the demand for new materials comes from IC fabs. “Semiconductors always drive the materials focus, because it’s rare to find unique demands in the other markets,” said Jackson. “However, the scale can be much larger in the other segments, and that can drive improvements in gases used in semiconductor fabs. An example is ammonia which is used in huge volumes by LED fabs, and similarly when thin-film solar was happening there was huge demand for germane.”

Linde assists customers in realizing continuous technology progress through improvements in the ability to reduce chemical variability in existing products and in the development of new materials that are critical to support customers’ technology roadmaps. “We feel as thought we need to be better positioned to be able to support customers when they require it,” said Jackson. “Quite frankly, some materials don’t travel well. I’m not suggesting that suddenly we’ll start supplying everything locally, but this facility will help us start supplying customers throughout Asia.”

The Linde Electronics R&D Center (Fig. 2) will be used for improvement of product quality through advanced synthesis, purification, packaging and new applications development. These improvements are enabled by Linde’s advanced analytical processes and quality control systems that verify compositions and manage impurities.

FIG2: New electronics R&D center in Taichung, Taiwan will support customers throughout the Asia Pacific region. (Source: The Linde Group)

Analysis and Synthesis

“The way that we have it configured it has two distinct features that work together, but the main focus is on analysis and that’s where the main investment has been made,” explained Jackson. “We think that we probably have the most advanced lab in Asia and perhaps in the world. At least for the materials portfolio that we have we can do ‘finger-printing’ analysis, including all the trace-elements and all the metals, which is to say all the things that can potentially affect process.”

The second feature of this lab is the ability to create experimental quantities of completely new chemical and blends to meet the needs of customers working in advanced device R&D and in pilot-line production. The lab features new purification and new synthesis technologies that work on small quantities of materials. “One capability we have is to do binary- or mixed-component blends,” elaborated Jackson. “In terms of purification, we have a bench-scale set-up with absorbance and distillation, but generally that would be done somewhere else. That’s the advantage of being connected to the global network of labs.”

“There are unique requirements for every fab in every industry,” reminded Jackson. “For example, nitrous-oxide is a key critical-material for OLED manufacturing and you must maintain repeatability in every cylinder, in every truck, and down every pipe. How do you reduce the variability in the molecule regardless of the supply mode? Having the ability to do in-depth analysis certainly gives us a leg up.”

Since sustainability of the supply-chain is always essential, one trend is HVM fabs today is the consideration of recover methods for critical gases such as argon, helium, and neon. “In some cases it works, and particularly as the scale continues to grow. Being able to use the expertise from our Linde Engineering colleagues and scaling it to the right size for semiconductor manufacturing is really important for us.”


3D-NAND Deposition and Etch Integration

Thursday, September 1st, 2016


By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

3D-NAND chips are in production or pilot-line manufacturing at all major memory manufacturers, and they are expected to rapidly replace most 2D-NAND chips in most applications due to lower costs and greater reliability. Unlike 2D-NAND which was enabled by lithography, 3D-NAND is deposition and etch enabled. “With 3D-NAND you’re talking about 40nm devices, while the most advanced 2D-NAND is running out of steam due to the limited countable number of stored electrons-per-cell, and in terms of the repeatability due to parasitics between adjacent cells,” reminded Harmeet Singh, corporate vice president of Lam Research in an exclusive interview with SemiMD to discuss the company’s presentation at the Flash Memory Summit 2016.

“We’re in an era where deposition and etch uniquely define the customer roadmap,” said Singh,“and we are the leading supplier in 3D-NAND deposition and etch.” Though each NAND manufacturer has different terminology for their unique 3D variant, from a manufacturing process integration perspective they all share similar challenges in the following simplified process sequences:

1)    Deposition of 32-64 pairs of blanket “mold stack” thin-films,

2)    Word-line hole etch through all layers and selective fill of NAND cell materials, and

3)    Formation of “staircase” contacts to each cell layer.

Each of these unique process modules is needed to form the 3D arrays of NVM cells.

For the “mold stack” deposition of blanket alternating layers, it is vital for the blanket PECVD to be defect-free since any defects are mirrored and magnified in upper-layers. All layers must also be stress-free since the stress in each deposited layer accumulates as strain in the underlying silicon wafer, and with over 32 layers the additive strain can easily warp wafers so much that lithographic overlay mismatch induces significant yield loss. Controlled-stress backside thin-film depositions can also be used to balance the stress of front-side films.

Hole Etch

“The difficult etch of the hole, the materials are different so the challenges is different,” commented Singh about the different types of 3D-NAND now being manufactured by leading fabs. “During this conference, one of our customer presented that they do not see the hole diameters shrinking, so at this point it appears to us that shrinking hole diameters will not happen until after the stacking in z-dimension reaches some limit.”

Tri-Layer Resist (TLR) stacks for the hole patterning allow for the amorphous carbon hardmask material to be tuned for maximum etch resistance without having to compromise the resolution of the photo-active layer needed for patterning. Carbon mask is over 3 microns thick and carbon-etching is usually responsive to temperature, so Lam’s latest wafer-chuck for etching features >100 temperature control zones. “This is an example of where Lam is using it’s processes expertise to optimize both the hardmask etch as well as the actual hole etch,” explained Singh.

Staircase Etch

The Figure shows a simplified cross-sectional schematic of how the unique “staircase” wordline contacts are cost-effectively manufactured. The established process of record (POR) for forming the “stairs” uses a single mask exposure of thick KrF photoresist—at 248nm wavelength—to etch 8 sets of stairs controlled by a precise resist trim. The trimming step controls the location of the steps such that they align with the contact mask, and so must be tightly controlled to minimize any misalignment yield loss.

A) Simplified cross-sectional schematic of the staircase etch for 3D-NAND contacts using thick photoresist, B) which allows for controlled resist trimming to expose the next “stair” such that C) successive trimming creates 8-16 steps from a single initial photomask exposure. (Source: Ed Korczynski)

Lam is working on ways to tighten the trimming etch uniformity such that 16 sets of stairs can be repeatably etched from a single KrF mask exposure. Halving the relative rate of vertical etch to lateral etch of the KrF resist allows for the same resist thickness to be used for double the number of etches, saving lithography cost. “We see an amazing future ahead because we are just at the beginning of this technology,” commented Singh.


Silicon as Disruptive Platform for IoT Applications

Monday, August 29th, 2016


By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

Marie Semeria, chief executive officer of CEA-Leti (, sat down with SemiMD during SEMICON West to discuss how the French R&D and pilot manufacturing campus—located at the foot of the beautiful French alps near Grenoble—is expanding the scope of it’s activities to develop systems solutions for the Internet-of-Things (IoT). Part-1 on hardware/software co-development was published last month.

Korczynski: Regarding ‘IoT’ applications, we expect that chips must be very low cost to be successful, and at the same time the ultimately winning solutions will be those that combine the best functionalities from different technology spaces each in a ‘sweet spot’ of cost to performance. It seems that being able to do it on SOI wafers could produce the right volumes.

Semeria: Yes. It could be enough.

Korczynski: Do you have any feel in advance for how much area of silicon is needed? Some small ADC, an 8-bit micro-controller, and RF components may be done in different processes and then integrated. Is it possible that the total area of silicon needed could be less than a square millimeter?

Semeria: Yes.

Korczynski: Well, if they are that small then we have to remember how many units we’d get from just a single wafer, and there are 24 wafers in a batch…

Semeria: One batch can be enough for one market, depending upon the application.

Korczynski: If this is the case, then even though the concept of purely-additive roll-to-roll processes are attractive, oddly they may be too efficient and produce more units than the world can absorb. If we can do all that we need to do with established silicon wafer fab technology creating ICs smaller than a square millimeter then it will be very cost-effective.

Semeria: Leti’s strategy is to keep the performance of solid-state devices, so not to go to organic electronics. Use silicon as the differentiator to lower the cost, add more functions, and then miniaturize all that can be miniaturized. In this way we are achieving integration of MEMS with small electronics in arrays as small as one millimeter square. When you deal with such small die you can put them inside of flexible materials, inside of a t-shirt and it’s no problem. So that’s our strategy to keep small silicon and put it in clothes, in shoes, in windows, in glasses, and all sorts of flexible materials. When you are thinning substrates for bonding, then the thinned silicon is very flexible.

Korczynski: In 1999 I worked for one of the first companies selling through-silicon via technology, and it was all about backside thinning so I’ve played with flexible wafers.

Semeria: So you know what I mean.

Korczynski: Around 50 microns and below as long as you etch away any grinding defects from the backside it is very strong and very flexible (Fig. 1). At 50 microns the chip is still thick enough to be easily picked-and-placed, but it’s flexible. Below 10 microns the wafer is difficult to handle.

FIGURE 1: 50 micron thin silicon wafers can be strong and very flexible. (Source: Virginia Semiconductor)

Semeria: To maintain the advantage of cost for different applications spaces, we are developing the ‘chiplet’ approach which means a network of chips. It starts with a digital platform, then you add an active interposer to connect different dice. For example you could have 28nm-node on the bottom and a 14nm-node chip on top for some specific function. Then you can put embedded memory and RF connected through the interposer, and it’s the approach that we promote for the first generation of multi-functional integration on digital. Very flexible, cost-effective.

Korczynski: This is using some sort of bus to move information?

Semeria: Yes, this will be an electronic bus for the first generation, as we recently announced. Then a photonics interposer could be used for higher-speed data rate in a future generation. We have a full roadmap with different types of integration schemes. So it’s a way to combine all with silicon. Everything is intended to be integrated into existing 300mm silicon facilities. Some weeks ago we presented the first results showing silicon quantum bits built on 300mm substrates, and fully compatible with CMOS processing. So it’s the way we are going, taking a very disruptive approach using the foundation of proven 300mm silicon processing.

Korczynski: Interesting.

Semeria: For example, regarding driving assistance applications we have to consider fusion integration of different sensors, and complete coverage of the environment with low power-consumption. For computing capacity we developed a completely disruptive approach, very different from Intel and very different from nVidia which use consumer products as the basis for automotive application products. Specifically for automotive we developed a new probabilistic methodology to avoid all of the calculations based on floating-point. In this way we can divide the computing needs of the device by 100, so it’s another example of developing just the right device for the right application adapted for the right environment. So the approach is very different in development for IoT instead of mainstream CMOS.

Korczynski: For automotive there’s such a requirement for reliability, with billions of dollars at stake in product recalls and potential lawsuits, the auto industry is very risk-averse for very good reasons. So historically they’ve always used trailing-edge nodes, and if you want to supply to them you have to commit to 10 or maybe 20 years of manufacturing, and yet we still want to add in advance functionalities. The impression I’ve gotten is that the 28nm FD-SOI platform is fairly ideal here.

Semeria: FD-SOI is very reliable and very efficient. That’s why when we showed our demonstrator at the recent DAC it’s based on the STMicroelectronics micro-controller. It’s very reliable and adaptable for automotive applications.

Korczynski: Is it at 28nm?

Semeria: No, about 40nm now. The latest generation is not needed, because we changed the algorithms so we didn’t need so much capacity in computing. In IoT there is space to use 40nm or 32nm down to 28nm. It’s a great space to use ‘old technologies’ and optimize them with the right algorithms, the right signal-processing, and the right security. So it’s very exciting for Leti because we have all of the key competencies to be able to handle the IoT challenge, and there is a great ability to make various integration schemes depending upon the application. There is a very large space to demonstrate, and to develop new materials.

Korczynski: Does this relate to some recent work I’ve seen from Leti with micro-cantilevers?

Semeria: Yes, this is the work we are doing with CalTech on micro-resonators (Fig. 2).

FIGURE 2: MEMS/NEMS silicon cantilever resonator capable of detecting individual adhered molecules, for integration with digital CMOS in a complete IoT sensing system. (Source: Leti)

Korczynski: Thank you very much for taking the time to discuss these important trends.

Semeria: It is a pleasure.


Fab Facilities Data and Defectivity

Monday, August 1st, 2016


By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

In-the-know attendees at SEMICON West at a Thursday morning working breakfast heard from executives representing the world’s leading memory fabs discuss manufacturing challenges at the 4th annual Entegris Yield Forum. Among the excellent presenters was Norm Armour, managing director worldwide facilities and corporate EHSS of Micron. Armour has been responsible for some of the most famous fabs in the world, including the Malta, New York logic fab of GlobalFoundries, and AMD’s Fab25 in Austin, Texas. He discussed how facilities systems effect yield and parametric control in the fab.

Just recently, his organization within Micron broke records working with M&W on the new flagship Fab 10X in Singapore—now running 3D-NAND—by going from ground-breaking to first-tool-in in less than 12 months, followed by over 400 tools installed in 3 months. “The devil is in the details across the board, especially for 20nm and below,” declared Armour. “Fabs are delicate ecosystems. I’ll give a few examples from a high-volume fab of things that you would never expect to see, of component-level failures that caused major yield crashes.”

Ultra-Pure Water (UPW)

Ultra-Pure Water (UPW) is critical for IC fab processes including cleaning, etching, CMP, and immersion lithography, and contamination specs are now at the part-per-billion (ppb) or part-per-trillion (ppt) levels. Use of online monitoring is mandatory to mitigate risk of contamination. International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) guidelines for UPW quality (minimum acceptable standard) include the following critical parameters:

  • Resistivity @ 25C >18.0 Mohm-cm,
  • TOC <1.0 ppb,
  • Particles/ml < 0.3 @ 0.05 um, and
  • Bacteria by culture 1000 ml <1.

In one case associated with a gate cleaning tool, elevated levels of zinc were detected with lots that had passed through one particular tool for a variation on a classic SC1 wet clean. High-purity chemistries were eliminated as sources based on analytical testing, so the root-cause analysis shifted to to the UPW system as a possible source. Then statistical analysis could show a positive correlation between UPW supply lines equipped with pressure regulators and the zinc exposure. The pressure regulator vendor confirmed use of zinc-oxide and zinc-stearate as part of the assembly process of the pressure regulator. “It was really a curing agent for an elastomer diaphragm that caused the contamination of multiple lots,” confided Armour.

UPW pressure regulators are just one of many components used in facilities builds that can significantly degrade fab yield. It is critical to implement a rigorous component testing and qualification process prior to component installation and widespread use. “Don’t take anything for granted,” advised Armour. “Things like UPW regulators have a first-order impact upon yield and they need to be characterized carefully, especially during new fab construction and fit up.”

Photoresist filtration

Photoresist filtration has always been important to ensure high yield in manufacturing, but it has become ultra-critical for lithography at the 20nm node and below. Dependable filtration is particularly important because industry lacks in-line monitoring technology capable of detecting particles in the range below ~40nm.

Micron tried using filters with 50nm pore diameters for a 20nm node process…and saw excessive yield losses along with extreme yield variability. “We characterized pressure-drop as a function of flow-rate, and looked at various filter performances for both 20nm and 40nm particles,” explained Armour. “We implemented a new filter, and lo and behold saw a step function increase in our yields. Defect densities dropped dramatically.” Tracking the yields over time showed that the variability was significantly reduced around the higher yield-entitlement level.

Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC)

Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC) is ‘public enemy number one’ in 20nm-node and below fabs around the world. “In one case there were forrest fires in Sumatra and the smoke was going into the atmosphere and actually went into our air intakes in a high volume fab in Taiwan thousands of miles away, and we saw a spike in hydrogen-sulfide,” confided Armour. “It increased our copper CMP defects, due to copper migration. After we installed higher-quality AMC filters for the make-up air units we saw dramatic improvement in copper defects. So what is most important is that you have real-time on-line monitoring of AMC levels.”

Building collaborative relationships with vendors is critical for troubleshooting component issues and improving component quality. “Partnering with suppliers like Entegris is absolutely essential,” continued Armour. “On AMCs for example, we have had a very close partnership that developed out of a team working together at our Inotera fab in Taiwan. There are thousands of important technologies that we need to leverage now to guarantee high yields in leading-node fabs.” The Figure shows just some of the AMCs that must be monitored in real-time.

Big Data

The only way to manage all of this complexity is with “Big Data” and in addition to primary process parameter that must be tracked there are many essential facilities inputs to analytics:

  • Environmental Parameters – temperature, humidity, pressure, particle count, AMCs, etc.
  • Equipment Parameters – run state, motor current, vibration, valve position, etc.
  • Effluent Parameters – cooling water, vacuum, UPW, chemicals, slurries, gases, etc.

“Conventional wisdom is that process tools create 90% of your defect density loss, but that’s changing toward facilities now,” said Armour. “So why not apply the same methodologies within facilities that we do in the fab?” SPC is after-the-fact reactive, while APC is real-time fault detection on input variables, including such parameters as vibration or flow-rate of a pump.

“Never enough data,” enthused Armour. “In terms of monitoring input variables, we do this through the PLCs and basically use SCADA to do the fault-detection interdiction on the critical input variables. This has been proven to be highly effective, providing a lot of protection, and letting me sleep better at night.”

Micron also uses these data to provide site-to-site comparisons. “We basically drive our laggard sites to meet our world-class sites in terms of reducing variation on facility input variables,” explained Armour. “We’re improving our forecasting as a result of this capability, and ultimately protecting our fab yields. Again, the last thing a fab manager wants to see is facilities causing yield loss and variation.”


Applied Materials Releases Selective Etch Tool

Wednesday, June 29th, 2016


By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

Applied Materials has disclosed commercial availability of new Selectra(TM) selective etch twin-chamber hardware for the company’s high-volume manufacturing (HVM) Producer® platform. Using standard fluorine and chlorine gases already used in traditional Reactive Ion Etch (RIE) chambers, this new tool provides atomic-level precision in the selective removal of materials in 3D devices structures increasingly used for the most advanced silicon ICs. The tool is already in use at three customer fabs for finFET logic HVM, and at two memory fab customers, with a total of >350 chambers planned to have been shipped to many customers by the end of 2016.

Figure 1 shows a simplified cross-sectional schematic of the Selectra chamber, where the dashed white line indicates some manner of screening functionality so that “Ions are blocked, chemistry passes through” according to the company. In an exclusive interview with Solid State Technology, company representative refused to disclose any hardware details. “We are using typical chemistries that are used in the industry,” explained Ajay Bhatnagar, managing director of Selective Removal Products for Applied Materials. “If there are specific new applications needed than we can use new chemistry. We have a lot of IP on how we filter ions and how we allow radicals to combine on the wafer to create selectivity.”

FIG 1: Simplified cross-sectional schematic of a silicon wafer being etched by the neutral radicals downstream of the plasma in the Selectra chamber. (Source: Applied Materials)

From first principles we can assume that the ion filtering is accomplished with some manner of electrically-grounded metal screen. This etch technology accomplishes similar process results to Atomic Layer Etch (ALE) systems sold by Lam, while avoiding the need for specialized self-limiting chemistries and the accompanying chamber throughput reductions associated with pulse-purge process recipes.

“What we are doing is being able to control the amount of radicals coming to the wafer surface and controlling the removal rates very uniformly across the wafer surface,” asserted Bhatnagar. “If you have this level of atomic control then you don’t need the self-limiting capability. Most of our customers are controlling process with time, so we don’t need to use self-limiting chemistry.” Applied Materials claims that this allows the Selectra tool to have higher relative productivity compared to an ALE tool.

Due to the intrinsic 2D resolutions limits of optical lithography, leading IC fabs now use multi-patterning (MP) litho flows where sacrificial thin-films must be removed to create the final desired layout. Due to litho limits and CMOS device scaling limits, 2D logic transistors are being replaced by 3D finFETs and eventually Gate-All-Around (GAA) horizontal nanowires (NW). Due to dielectric leakage at the atomic scale, 2D NAND memory is being replaced by 3D-NAND stacks. All of these advanced IC fab processes require the removal of atomic-scale materials with extreme selectivity to remaining materials, so the Selectra chamber is expected to be a future work-horse for the industry.

When the industry moves to GAA-NW transistors, alternating layers of Si and SiGe will be grown on the wafer surface, 2D patterned into fins, and then the sacrificial SiGe must be selectively etched to form 3D arrays of NW. Figure 2 shows the SiGe etched from alternating Si/SiGe stacks using a Selectra tool, with sharp Si corners after etch indicating excellent selectivity.

FIG 2: SEM cross-section showing excellent etch of SiGe within alternating Si/SiGe layers, as will be needed for Gate-All-Around (GAA) horizontal NanoWire (NW) transistor formation. (Source: Applied Materials)

“One of the fundamental differences between this system and old downstream plasma ashers, is that it was designed to provide extreme selectivity to different materials,” said Matt Cogorno, global product manager of Selective Removal Products for Applied Materials. “With this system we can provide silicon to titanium-nitride selectivity at 5000:1, or silicon to silicon-nitride selectivity at 2000:1. This is accomplished with the unique hardware architecture in the chamber combined with how we mix the chemistries. Also, there is no polymer formation in the etch process, so after etching there are no additional processing issues with the need for ashing and/or a wet-etch step to remove polymers.”

Systems can also be used to provide dry cleaning and surface-preparation due to the extreme selectivity and damage-free material removal.  “You can control the removal rates,” explained Cogorno. “You don’t have ions on the wafer, but you can modulate the number of radicals coming down.” For HVM of ICs with atomic-scale device structures, this new tool can widen process windows and reduce costs compared to both dry RIE and wet etching.


Controlling Variabilities When Integrating IC Fab Materials

Friday, April 15th, 2016


By Ed Korczynski, Senior Technical Editor, SemiMD/Solid State Technology

Semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing has always relied upon the supply of critical materials from a global supply chain. Now that shrinks of IC feature sizes have begun to reach economic limits, future functionality improvements in ICs are increasingly derived from the use of new materials. The Critical Materials Conference 2016—to be held May 5-6 in Hillsboro, Oregon (—will explore best practices in the integration of novel materials into manufacturing. Dr. David Thompson, Senior Director, Center of Excellence in Chemistry, Applied Materials will present on “Agony in New Material Introductions – minimizing and correlating variabilities,” which he was willing to discuss in advance with SemiMD.

Korczynski: With more and more materials being considered for use in high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of advanced ICs, how do you begin to selectively screen out materials that will not work for one reason or another to be able to reach the best new material for a target application?

Thompson: While there’s ‘no one size fits all’ solution to this, it typically starts with a review of what’s available and known about the current offerings. With respect to the talk at the CMC, we’ll review the challenges we run into after the materials system and chemistries are set and have been proven generally viable, but still require significant optimization in order to get acceptable yields for manufacturing. It’s a very long road from device proof of concept on a new materials system to a viable manufacturing process.

Korczynski: Since new materials are being considered for use on the atomic-scale in advanced devices, doesn’t all of this have to be done with control at the atomic scale?

Thompson: For the material on the chip, many mainstream analytical techniques are used to achieve atomic level control including TEMs and AFMs with atomic resolution during film development for many applications. Unfortunately, this resolution is not available for the chemicals we’re relying on to deposit these materials. For a typical precursor that weighs in the 200 Dalton range, a gram of precursor may have 5 × 1020 molecules. That’s a lot of molecules. Even with ppb (109) resolutions on analytical, you’re still dealing with invisible populations of >1010 molecules. It gets worse. While trace metals analysis can hit ppb levels, molecular analysis techniques are typically limited in the 0.1 to 0.01 percent resolutions for most semiconductor precursors and there may be impurities which are invisible to routine analytical techniques.

Ultimately, we rely on analytical techniques to control the gross parameters and disciplined process controls to verify suppliers produce the same compositions the same way, and to manage impurities. On the process and hardware side, it’s like threading the needle trying to get the right film at the right throughput, in a process space that’s as tolerant as possible to the inevitable variability in these chemistries.

Korczynski: With all of this investment in developing one specialty material supplier for advanced IC manufacturing, what is the cost to develop and qualify a second source?

Thompson: Generally, it’s not sustainable to release a product with dual specialty material sources. The problem with dual-sourcing is chemical suppliers protect their knowledge—not simple IP—but also their sub-supply-chains and proprietary methods of production, transport and delivery. However, given how trace elements in the formulation can change depending on conditions the molecules experience over time, the customer in many cases needs to develop two separate sub-recipes based on the specific vendor’s chemistry they are using. So, redundancy in the supply chain is prudent as is making sure the vendor can produce the material in different locations.

There are countless examples over the last 20 years of what I like to call ‘the agony of the supply-chain’ when a process got locked into using a material when the only supply was from a Ph.D. chemist making it in small batches in a lab. In most cases the initial batch of any new molecule is made at a scale that would fit in a coffee mug. Sometimes though scaling up the first industrial-scale batch can alter impurity factors that change yields on the wafer even with improved purification. So while a customer would like to keep using a small batch production, it’s not sustainable but trying to qualify a second vendor in this environment presents significant challenges.

Korczynski: Can you share an example with us of how your team brought a source of subtle variation under control?

Thompson: We had a process using a new metal film, and in the early development everything looked great. Eventually we observed a drift of process results that was more pronounced with some ampoules and less so with others. The root cause initially eluded us. Then, a bright Ph.D. on our team said it’s interesting that the supplier did not report a particular contaminant that would tend to be present as a byproduct of the reaction. The supplier confirmed it was present and variable at concentrations in the 100-300 ppm concentration in the blend. This contaminant was relatively more volatile than the main component due to vapor pressure differences and much more reactive with the substrate/wafer. It was found this variability in the chemistry induced the process variation on the wafer (as shown in Figure 1).


Chasing impurities and understanding their impact requires rigor and a lot of data collection. There’s no Star Trek analyzer we can use to give us knowledge of all impurities present and the role of those impurities on the process. Many impurities are invisible to routine analytical techniques, so we work very closely with vendors to establish a chemistry analytical protocol for each precursor that may consist of 5-10 different techniques. For the impurities we can’t detect we rely on excellent manufacturing process control and sub-supply sourcing management.

Korczynski: Is the supply-chain for advanced precursors for deposition and etch supplying everything we need in early R&D?

Thompson: New precursor ideation—the science that leads to new classes of compounds with new reactivity that Roy Gordon, or more recently Chuck Winter, have  been doing in academia is critically important and while there are a few academics doing excellent work in this space, in general there’s not enough focus on this topic.While we see many IP protected molecules, too often they are obvious simple modifications to one skilled in the art, consisting of merely adding a functional group off of a ring, or mixing and matching known ligand systems. We don’t see a lot of disruptive chemistries. The industry is hunting for differentiated reactivity, and evolutionary precursor development approaches generally aren’t sufficiently disruptive. While this research is useful in terms of tuning a vapor pressure or thermal stability it only very rarely produces a differentiated reactivity.

Korczynski: Do we need new methodologies to more efficiently manage all of this?

Thompson: Applied has made significant investments over the last 5 years to help accelerate the readiness of new materials across the board. One of the best things about working at Applied is the rate at which we can learn and build an ecosystem around a new material. With our strength in chemistry, deposition, CMP, etch, metrology and a host of other technologies, we get a fast, strong feedback loop going to accelerate issue discovery, resolution and general learning around new materials.

On the chemical supply-chain front, the need is making sure that chemical vendors accelerate their analytical chemistry development on new materials. Correlating the variability of chemistry to process results and ultimately yield is the real battle. The more knowledge we have of a chemistry moving into development, the faster learning can occur. I explain to my team that we can’t be proactive and respond to things we didn’t anticipate. Situations where trying to develop the analytical technique to see the impurity responsible for causing (or resolving) a variability is to start out at a significant disadvantage. However, we’ve seen a good response from suppliers on new materials and significant improvement on the early learnings necessary to minimize the agony of new material introductions.

IoT Demands Part 2: Test and Packaging

Friday, April 15th, 2016

By Ed Korczynski, Senior Technical Editor, Solid State Technology, SemiMD

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) adds new sensing and communications to improve the functionality of all manner of things in the world. Solid-state and semiconducting materials for new integrated circuits (IC) intended for ubiquitous IoT applications will have to be extremely small and low-cost. To understand the state of technology preparedness to meet the anticipated needs of the different application spaces, experts from GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Cadence, Mentor Graphics and Presto Engineering gave detailed answers to questions about IoT chip needs in EDA and fab nodes, as published in “IoT Demands:  EDA and Fab Nodes.” We continue with the conversation below.

Korczynski: For test of IoT devices which may use ultra-low threshold voltage transistors, what changes are needed compared to logic test of a typical “low-power” chip?

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Susceptibility to process corners and operating conditions becomes heightened at near-threshold voltage levels. This translates into either more conservative design sign-off criteria, or the need for higher levels of manufacturing screening/tests. Either way, it has an impact on cost, be it hidden by over-design, or overtly through more costly qualification and test processes.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

We need to make sure that the testability has also been designed to be functional structurally in this mode. In addition, sub-threshold voltage operation must account for non-linear transistor characteristics and the strong impact of local process variation, for which the conventional testability arsenal is still very poor. Automotive screening used low voltage operation (VLV) to detect latent defects, but at very low voltage close to the transistor threshold, digital becomes analog, and therefore if the usual concept still works for defect detection, functional test and @speed tests require additional expertise to be both meaningful and efficient from a test coverage perspective.

Korczynski:  Do we have sufficient specifications within “5G” to handle IoT device interoperability for all market segments?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

The estimated timeline for standardization availability of 5G is around 2020. 5G is being designed keeping three classes of applications in mind:  Enhanced Mobile Broadband, Massive IoT, and Mission-Critical Control. Specifically for IoT, the focus is on efficient, low-cost communication with deep coverage. We will start to see early 5G technologies start to appear around 2018, and device connectivity,

interoperability and marshaling the data they generate that can apply to multiple IoT sub-segments and markets is still very much in development.

Korczynski:  Will the 1st-generation of IoT devices likely include wide varieties of solution for different market-segments such as industrial vs. retail vs. consumer, or will most device use similar form-factors and underlying technologies?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

If we use CES 2016 as a showcase, we are seeing IoT “Things” that are becoming use-case or application-centric as they apply to specific sub-segments such as Connected Home, Automotive, Medical, Security, etc. There is definitely more variety on the consumer front vs. industrial. Vendors / OEMs / System houses are differentiating at the user-interface design and form-factor levels while the “under-the-hood” IC capabilities and component technologies that provide the atomic intelligence are fairly common. ​

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Right now it seems like everyone is swinging for the fence. Everyone wants the home-run product that will reach a billion devices sold. Generality generally leads to sub-optimality, so a single device usually fails to meet the needs and expectations of many. Devices that are optimized for more specific use cases and elements of purchasing criteria will win out. The question of interface is an interesting one.

Korczynski:  Will there be different product life-cycles for different IoT market-segments, such as 1-3 years for consumer but 5-10 years for industrial?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

That certainly seems to be the case. According to Gartner’s market analysis for IoT, Consumer is expected to grow at a faster pace in terms of units compared to Enterprise, while Enterprise is expected to lead in revenue. Also the churn-cycle in Consumer is higher / faster compared to Enterprise. Today’s wearables or smart-phones are good reference examples. This will however vary by the type of “Thing” and sub-segment. For example, you expect to have your smart refrigerator for a longer time period compared to smart clothing or eyewear. As ASPs of the “Things”come down over time and new classes of products such as disposables hit the market, we can expect even larger volumes.​

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

The market segments continue to be driven by the same use cases. In consumer wearables, short cycles are linked to fashion trends and rapid obsolescence, where consumer home use has longer cycles closer to industrial market requirements. We believe that the lifecycle norms will hold true for IoT devices.

Korczynski:  For the IoT application of infrastructure monitoring (e.g. bridges, pipelines, etc.) long-term (10-20 year) reliability will be essential, while consumer applications may be best served by 3-5 year reliability devices which cost less; how well can we quantify the trade-off between cost and chip reliability?

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Conceptually we know very well how to make devices more reliable. We can lower current densities with bigger wires, we can run at cooler temperatures, and so on.  The difficulty is always in finding optimality for a given criterion across the, for practical purposes, infinite tradeoffs to be made.

Korczynski:  Why is the talk of IoT not just another “Dot Com” hype cycle?

Rajeev Rajan, Vice President of Internet of Things (IoT) at GLOBALFOUNDRIES

​​I participated in a panel at SEMICON China in Shanghai last month that discussed a similar question. If we think of IoT as a “brand new thing” (no pun intended), then we can think of it as hype. However if we look at the IoT as as set of use-cases that can take advantage of an evolution of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) going towards broader connectivity, huge amounts of data generated and exchanged, and a generational increase in internet and communication network bandwidths (i.e. 5G), then it seems a more down-to-earth technological progression.

Nicolas Williams, product marketing manager, Mentor Graphics

Unlike the Dot Com hype, which was built upon hope and dreams of future solutions that may or may not have been based in reality, IoT is real business. For example, in a 2016 IC Insights report, we see that last year $63.4 billion in revenue was generated for IoT systems and the market is growing at about 20% CAGR. This same report also shows IoT semiconductor sales of over $15 billion in 2015 with a CAGR of 21.1%.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

It is the investment needed up front to create sensing agents and an infrastructure for the hardware foundation of the IoT that will lead to big data and ultimately value creation.

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

There will be plenty of hype cycles for products and product categories along the way. However, the foundational shift of the connection of things is a diode through which civilization will only pass through in one direction.

IoT Demands Part 1: EDA and Fab Nodes

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is expected to add new sensing and communications to improve the functionality of all manner of things in the world:  bridges sensing and reporting when repairs are needed, parts automatically informing where they are in storage and transport, human health monitoring, etc. Solid-state and semiconducting materials for new integrated circuits (IC) intended for ubiquitous IoT applications will have to be assembled at low-cost and small-size in High Volume Manufacturing (HVM). Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and other sensors are being combined with Radio-Frequency (RF) ICs in miniaturized packages for the first wave of growth in major sub-markets.

To meet the anticipated needs of the different IoT application spaces, SemiMD asked leading companies within critical industry segments about the state of technology preparedness:


*  Electronic Design Automation (EDA) – Cadence and Mentor Graphics,

*  IC and complex system test – Presto Engineering.

Korczynski:  Today, ICs for IoT applications typically use 45nm/65nm-node which are “Node -3″ (N-3) compared to sub-20nm-node chips in HVM. Five years from now, when the bleeding-edge will use 10nm node technology, will IoT chips still use N-3 of 28nm-node (considered a “long-lived node”) or will 45nm-node remain the likely sweet-spot of price:performance?

Timothy Dry, product marketing manager, GLOBALFOUNDRIES

In 5 years time, there will be a spread of technology solutions addressing low, middle, and high ends of IoT applications. At the low end, IoT end nodes for applications like connected smoke

detectors, security sensors will be at 55, 40nm ULP and ULL for lowest system power, and low cost. These applications will be typically served by MCUs <50DMIPs. Integrated radios (BLE, 802.15.4), security, Power Management Unit (PMU), and eFlash or MRAM will be common features. Connected LED lighting is forecasted to be a high volume IoT application. The LED drivers will use BCD extensions of 130nm—40nm—that can also support the radio and protocol-MCU with Flash.

In the mid-range, applications like smart-meters and fitness/medical monitoring will need systems that have more processing power <300DMIPS. These products will be implemented in 40nm, 28nm and GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ new 22nm FDSOI technology that uses software-controlled body-biasing to tune SoC operation for lowest dynamic power. Multiple wireless (BLE/802.15.4, WiFi, LPWAN) and wired connectivity (Ethernet, PLC) protocols with security will be integrated for gateway products.

High-end products like smart-watches, learning thermostats, home security/monitoring cameras, and drones will require MPU-class IC products (~2000DMIPs) and run high-order operating systems (e.g. Linux, Android). These products will be made in leading-edge nodes starting at 22FDX, 14FF and migrating to 7FF and beyond. Design for lowest dynamic power for longest battery life will be the key driver, and these products typically require human machine Interface (HMI) with animated graphics on a high resolution displays. Connectivity will include BLE, WiFi and cellular with strong security.

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

We have seen recent announcements of IoT targeted devices at 14nm. The value created by Moore’s Law integration should hold, and with that, there will be inherent advantages to those who leverage next generation process nodes. Still, other product categories may reach functionality saturation points where there is simply no more value obtained by adding more capability. We anticipate that there will be more “live” process nodes than ever in history.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

It is fair to say that most IoT devices will be a heterogeneous aggregation of analog functions rather than high power digital processors. Therefore, and by similarity with Bluetooth and RFID devices, 90nm and 65nm will remain the mainstream nodes for many sub-vertical markets, enabling the integration of RF and analog front-end functions with digital gate density. By default, sensors will stay out of the monolithic path for both design and cost reasons. The best answer would be that the IoT ASIC will follow eventually the same scaling as the MCU products, with embedded non-volatile memories, which today is 55-40nm centric and will move to 28nm with industry maturity and volumes.

Korczynski:  If most IoT devices will include some manner of sensor which must be integrated with CMOS logic and memory, then do we need new capabilities in EDA-flows and burn-in/test protocols to ensure meeting time-to-market goals?

Nicolas Williams, product marketing manager, Mentor Graphics

If we define a typical IoT device as a product that contains a MEMS sensor, A/D, digital processing, and a RF-connection to the internet, we can see that the fundamental challenge of IoT design is that teams working on this product need to master the analog, digital, MEMS, and RF domains. Often, these four domains require different experience and knowledge and sometimes design in these domains is accomplished by separate teams. IoT design requires that all four domains are designed and work together, especially if they are going on the same die. Even if the components are targeting separate dice that will be bonded together, they still need to work together during the layout and verification process. Therefore, a unified design flow is required.

Stephen Pateras, product marketing director, Mentor Graphics

Being able to quickly debug and create test patterns for various embedded sensor IP can be addressed with the adoption of the new IEEE 1687 IP plug-and-play standard. If a sensor IP block’s digital interface adheres to the standard, then any vendor-provided data required to initialize or operate the embedded sensor can be easily and quickly mapped to chip pins. Data sequences for multiple sensor IP blocks can also be merged to create optimized sequences that will minimize debug and test times.

Jon Lanson, vice president worldwide sales & marketing, Presto Engineering

From a testing standpoint, widely used ATEs are generally focused on a few purposes, but don’t necessarily cover all elements in a system. We think that IoT devices are likely to require complex testing flows using multiple ATEs to assure adequate coverage. This is likely to prevail for some time as short run volumes characteristic of IoT demands are unlikely to drive ATE suppliers to invest R&D dollars in creating new purpose-built machines.

Korczynski:  For the EDA of IoT devices, can all sensors be modeled as analog inputs within established flows or do we need new modeling capability at the circuit level?

Steve Carlson, product management group director, Cadence

Typically, the interface to the physical world has been partitioned at the electrical boundary. But as more mechanical and electro-mechanical sensors are more deeply integrated, there has been growing value in co-design, co-analysis, and co-optimization. We should see more multi-domain analysis over time.

Nicolas Williams, product marketing manager, Mentor Graphics

Designers of IoT devices that contain MEMS sensors need quality models in order to simulate their behavior under physical conditions such as motion and temperature. Unlike CMOS IC design, there are few standardized MEMS models for system-level simulation. State of the art MEMS modeling requires automatic generation of behavioral models based on the results of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using reduced-order modeling (ROM). ROM is a numerical methodology that reduces the analysis results to create Verilog-A models for use in AMS simulations for co-simulation of the MEMS device in the context of the IoT system.

Molecular Modeling of Materials Defects for Yield Recovery

Monday, March 21st, 2016


By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

New materials are being integrated into High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) of semiconductor ICs, while old materials are being extended with more stringent specifications. Defects within materials cause yield losses in HVM fabs, and engineers must identify the specific source of an observed defect before corrective steps can be taken. Honeywell Electronic Materials has been using molecular modeling software provided by Scienomics to both develop new materials and to modify old materials. Modeling allowed Honeywell to uncover the origin of subtle solvation-based film defects within Bottom Anti-Reflective Coatings (BARC) which were degrading yield in a customer’s lithographic process module.

Scienomics sponsored a Materials Modeling and Simulations online seminar on February 26th of this year, featuring Dr. Nancy Iwamoto of Honeywell discussing how Scienomics software was used to accelerate response to a customer’s manufacturing yield loss. “This was a product running at a customer line,” explained Iwamoto, “and we needed to find the solution.” The product was a Bottom Anti-Reflective Coating (BARC) organo-silicate polymer delivered in solution form and then spun on wafers to a precise thickness.

Originally observed during optical inspection by fab engineers as 1-2 micron sized vague spots in the BARC, the new defect type was difficult to see yet could be correlated to lithographic yield loss. The defects appeared to be discrete within the film instead of on the top surface, so the source was likely some manner of particle, yet filters did not capture these particles.

The filter captured some particles rich in silicon, as well as other particles rich in carbon. Sequential filtration showed that particles were passing through impossibly small pores, which suggested that the particles were built of deformable gel-like phases. The challenge was to find the material handling or processing situation, which resulted in thermodynamically possible and kinetically probable conditions that could form such gels.

Fig: Materials Processes and Simulations (MAPS) gives researchers access to visualization and analysis tools in a single user interface together with access to multiple simulation engines. (Source: Scienomics)

Molecular modeling and simulation is a powerful technique that can be used for materials design, functional upgrades, process optimization, and manufacturing. The Figure shows a dashboard for Scienomics’ modeling platform. Best practices in molecular modeling to find out-of-control parameters in HVM include a sequential workflow:

  • Build correct models based on experimental observables,
  • Simulate potential molecular structures based on known chemicals and hierarchical models,
  • Analyze manufacturing variabilities to identify excursion sources, and
  • Propose remedy for failure elimination.

Honeywell Electronic Materials researchers had very few experimental observables from which to start:  phenomenon is rare (yet effects yield), not filterable, yet from thermodynamic hydrolysis parameters it must be quasi-stable. Re-testing of product and re-examination of Outgoing Quality Control (OQC) data at the Honeywell production site showed that the molecular weight of the product was consistent with the desired distribution. There was also an observed BARC thickness increase of ~1nm on the wafer associated with the presence of these defects.

Using the modeling platform, Honeywell looked at the solubility parameters for different small molecular chains off of known-branched back-bone centers. Gel-like agglomerations could certainly be formed under the wrong conditions. Once the agglomerations form, they are not very stable so they can probably dis-aggregate when being forced through a filter and then re-aggregate on the other side.

What conditions could induce gel formation? After a few weeks of modeling, it was determined that temperature variations had the greatest influence on the agglomeration, and that variability was strongest at the ~250°K recommended for storage. Storage at 230°K resulted in measurably worse agglomeration, and any extreme in heating/cooling ramp rate tended to reduce solubility.

Molecular modeling was used in a forensic manner to find that the root cause of gel-like defects was related to thermal history:

*   Thermodynamics determined the most likely oligomers that could agglomerate,

*   Temperature-dependent solubility models determined which particles would reach wafers.

Because of the on-wafer BARC thickness increase of ~1nm, fab engineers could use all of the molecular modeling information to trace the temperature variation to bottles installed in the lithographic track tool. The fab was able to change specifications for the storage and handling of the BARC bottles to bring the process back into control.

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