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Posts Tagged ‘chip’

Silicon Photonics Technology Developments

Thursday, April 6th, 2017

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

With rapidly increasing use of “Cloud” client:server computing there is motivation to find cost-savings in the Cloud hardware, which leads to R&D of improved photonics chips. Silicon photonics chips could reduce hardware costs compared to existing solutions based on indium-phosphide (InP) compound semiconductors, but only with improved devices and integration schemes. Now MIT researchers working within the US AIM Photonics program have shown important new silicon photonics properties. Meanwhile, GlobalFoundries has found a way to allow for automated passive alignment of optical fibers to silicon chips, and makes chips on 300mm silicon wafers for improved performance at lower cost.

In a recent issue of Nature Photonics, MIT researchers present “Electric field-induced second-order nonlinear optical effects in silicon waveguides.” They also report prototypes of two different silicon devices that exploit those nonlinearities: a modulator, which encodes data onto an optical beam, and a frequency doubler, a component vital to the development of lasers that can be precisely tuned to a range of different frequencies.

This work happened within the American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics (AIM Photonics) program, which brought government, industry, and academia together in R&D of photonics to better position the U.S. relative to global competition. Federal funding of $110 million was combined with some $500 million from AIM Photonics’ consortium of state and local governments, manufacturing firms, universities, community colleges, and nonprofit organizations across the country. Michael Watts, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, has led the technological innovation in silicon photonics.

“Now you can build a phase modulator that is not dependent on the free-carrier effect in silicon,” says Michael Watts in an online interview. “The benefit there is that the free-carrier effect in silicon always has a phase and amplitude coupling. So whenever you change the carrier concentration, you’re changing both the phase and the amplitude of the wave that’s passing through it. With second-order nonlinearity, you break that coupling, so you can have a pure phase modulator. That’s important for a lot of applications.”

The first author on the new paper is Erman Timurdogan, who completed his PhD at MIT last year and is now at the silicon-photonics company Analog Photonics. The frequency doubler uses regions of p- and n-doped silicon arranged in regularly spaced bands perpendicular to an undoped silicon waveguide. The space between bands is tuned to a specific wavelength of light, such that a voltage across them doubles the frequency of the optical signal passing. Frequency doublers can be used as precise on-chip optical clocks and amplifiers, and as terahertz radiation sources for security applications.

GlobalFoundries’ Packaging Prowess

At the start of the AIM Photonics program in 2015, MIT researchers had demonstrated light detectors built from efficient ring resonators that they could reduce the energy cost of transmitting a bit of information down to about a picojoule, or one-tenth of what all-electronic chips require. Jagdeep Shah, a researcher at the U.S. Department of Defense’s Institute for Defense Analyses who initiated the program that sponsored the work said, “I think that the GlobalFoundries process was an industry-standard 45-nanometer design-rule process.”

The Figure shows that researchers at IBM developed an automated method to assemble twelve optical fibers to a
silicon chip while the fibers are dark, and GlobalFoundries chips can now be paired with this assembly technology. Because the micron-scale fibers must be aligned with nanometer precision, default industry standard has been to expensively align actively lit fibers. Leveraging the company’s work for Micro-Electro-Mechanical Sensors (MEMS) customers, GlobalFoundries uses an automated pick-and-place tool to push ribbons of multiple fibers into MEMS groves for the alignment. Ted Letavic, Global Foundries’ senior fellow, said the edge coupling process was in production for a telecommunications application. Silicon photonics may find first applications for very high bandwidth, mid- to long-distance transmission (30 meters to 80 kilometers), where spectral efficiency is the key driver according to Letavic.

FIGURE: GlobalFoundries chips can be combined with IBM’s automated method to assemble 12 optical fibers to a silicon photonics chip. (Source: IBM, Tymon Barwicz et al.)

GobalFoundries has now transferred its monolithic process from 200mm to 300mm-diameter silicon wafers, to achieve both cost-reduction and improved device performance. The 300mm fab lines feature higher-N.A. immersion lithography tools which provide better overlay and line width roughness (LWR). Because the of the extreme sensitivity of optical coupling to the physical geometry of light-guides, improving the patterning fidelity by nanometers can reduce transmission losses by 3X.

—E.K.

Lithographic Stochastic Limits on Resolution

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

The physical and economic limits of Moore’s Law are being approached as the commercial IC fab industry continues reducing device features to the atomic-scale. Early signs of such limits are seen when attempting to pattern the smallest possible features using lithography. Stochastic variation in the composition of the photoresist as well as in the number of incident photons combine to destroy determinism for the smallest devices in R&D. The most advanced Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) exposure tools from ASML cannot avoid this problem without reducing throughputs, and thereby increasing the cost of manufacturing.

Since the beginning of IC manufacturing over 50 years ago, chip production has been based on deterministic control of fabrication (fab) processes. Variations within process parameters could be controlled with statistics to ensure that all transistors on a chip performed nearly identically. Design rules could be set based on assumed in-fab distributions of CD and misalignment between layers to determine the final performance of transistors.

As the IC fab industry has evolved from micron-scale to nanometer-scale device production, the control of lithographic patterning has evolved to be able to bend-light at 193nm wavelength using Off-Axis Illumination (OAI) of Optical-Proximity Correction (OPC) mask features as part of Reticle Enhancement Technology (RET) to be able to print <40nm half-pitch (HP) line arrays with good definition. The most advanced masks and 193nm-immersion (193i) steppers today are able to focus more photons into each cubic-nanometer of photoresist to improve the contrast between exposed and non-exposed regions in the areal image. To avoid escalating cost and complexity of multi-patterning with 193i, the industry needs Extreme Ultra-Violet Lithography (EUVL) technology.

Figure 1 shows Dr. Britt Turkot, who has been leading Intel’s integration of EUVL since 1996, reassuring a standing-room-only crowd during a 2017 SPIE Advanced Lithography (http://spie.org/conferences-and-exhibitions/advanced-lithography) keynote address that the availability for manufacturing of EUVL steppers has been steadily improving. The new tools are close to 80% available for manufacturing, but they may need to process fewer wafers per hour to ensure high yielding final chips.

Figure 1. Britt Turkot (Intel Corp.) gave a keynote presentation on "EUVL Readiness for High-Volume Manufacturing” during the 2017 SPIE Advanced Lithography conference. (Source: SPIE)

The KLA-Tencor Lithography Users Forum was held in San Jose on February 26 before the start of SPIE-AL; there, Turcot also provided a keynote address that mentioned the inherent stochastic issues associated with patterning 7nm-node device features. We must ensure zero defects within the 10 billion contacts needed in the most advanced ICs. Given 10 billion contacts it is statistically certain that some will be subject to 7-sigma fluctuations, and this leads to problems in controlling the limited number of EUV photons reaching the target area of a resist feature. The volume of resist material available to absorb EUV in a given area is reduced by the need to avoid pattern-collapse when aspect-ratios increase over 2:1; so 15nm half-pitch lines will generally be limited to just 30nm thick resist. “The current state of materials will not gate EUV,” said Turkot, “but we need better stochastics and control of shot-noise so that photoresist will not be a long-term limiter.”

TABLE:  EUVL stochastics due to scaled contact hole size. (Source: Intel Corp.)

CONTACT HOLE DIAMETER 24nm 16nm
INCIDENT EUV PHOTONS 4610 2050
# ABSORBED IN AREAL IMAGE 700 215

From the LithoGuru blog of gentleman scientist Chris Mack (http://www.lithoguru.com/scientist/essays/Tennants_Law.html):

One reason why smaller pixels are harder to control is the stochastic effects of exposure:  as you decrease the number of electrons (or photons) per pixel, the statistical uncertainty in the number of electrons or photons actually used goes up. The uncertainty produces line-width errors, most readily observed as line-width roughness (LWR). To combat the growing uncertainty in smaller pixels, a higher dose is required.

We define a “stochastic” or random process as a collection of random variables (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stochastic_process), and a Wiener process (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiener_process) as a continuous-time stochastic process in honor of Norbert Wiener. Brownian motion and the thermally-driven diffusion of molecules exhibit such “random-walk” behavior. Stochastic phenomena in lithography include the following:

  • Photon count,
  • Photo-acid generator positions,
  • Photon absorption,
  • Photo-acid generation,
  • Polymer position and chain length,
  • Diffusion during post-exposure bake,
  • Dissolution/neutralization, and
  • Etching hard-mask.

Figure 2 shows the stochastics within EUVL start with direct photolysis and include ionization and scattering within a given discrete photoresist volume, as reported by Solid State Technology in 2010.

Figure 2. Discrete acid generation in an EUV resist is based on photolysis as well as ionization and electron scattering; stochastic variations of each must be considered in minimally scaled areal images. (Source: Solid State Technology)

Resist R&D

During SPIE-AL this year, ASML provided an overview of the state of the craft in EUV resist R&D. There has been steady resolution improvement over 10 years with Photo-sensitive Chemically-Amplified Resists (PCAR) from 45nm to 13nm HP; however, 13nm HP needed 58 mJ/cm2, and provided DoF of 99nm with 4.4nm LWR. The recent non-PCAR Metal-Oxide Resist (MOR) from Inpria has been shown to resolve 12nm HP with  4.7 LWR using 38 mJ/cm2, and increasing exposure to 70 mJ/cm2 has produced 10nm HP L/S patterns.

In the EUVL tool with variable pupil control, reducing the pupil fill increases the contrast such that 20nm diameter contact holes with 3nm Local Critical-Dimension Uniformity (LCDU) can be done. The challenge is to get LCDU to <2nm to meet the specification for future chips. ASML’s announced next-generation N.A. >0.5 EUVL stepper will use anamorphic mirrors and masks which will double the illumination intensity per cm2 compared to today’s 0.33 N.A. tools. This will inherently improve the stochastics, when eventually ready after 2020.

The newest generation EUVL steppers use a membrane between the wafer and the optics so that any resist out-gassing cannot contaminate the mirrors, and this allow a much wider range of materials to be used as resists. Regarding MOR, there are 3.5 times more absorbed photons and 8 times more electrons generated per photon compared to PCAR. Metal hard-masks (HM) and other under-layers create reflections that have a significant effect on the LWR, requiring tuning of the materials in resist stacks.

Default R&D hub of the world imec has been testing EUV resists from five different suppliers, targeting 20 mJ/cm2 sensitivity with 30nm thickness for PCAR and 18nm thickness for MOR. All suppliers were able to deliver the requested resolution of 16nm HP line/space (L/S) patterns, yet all resists showed LWR >5nm. In another experiment, the dose to size for imec’s “7nm-node” metal-2 (M2) vias with nominal pitch of 53nm was ~60mJ/cm2. All else equal, three times slower lithography costs three times as much per wafer pass.

—E.K.

3D-NAND Deposition and Etch Integration

Thursday, September 1st, 2016

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

3D-NAND chips are in production or pilot-line manufacturing at all major memory manufacturers, and they are expected to rapidly replace most 2D-NAND chips in most applications due to lower costs and greater reliability. Unlike 2D-NAND which was enabled by lithography, 3D-NAND is deposition and etch enabled. “With 3D-NAND you’re talking about 40nm devices, while the most advanced 2D-NAND is running out of steam due to the limited countable number of stored electrons-per-cell, and in terms of the repeatability due to parasitics between adjacent cells,” reminded Harmeet Singh, corporate vice president of Lam Research in an exclusive interview with SemiMD to discuss the company’s presentation at the Flash Memory Summit 2016.

“We’re in an era where deposition and etch uniquely define the customer roadmap,” said Singh,“and we are the leading supplier in 3D-NAND deposition and etch.” Though each NAND manufacturer has different terminology for their unique 3D variant, from a manufacturing process integration perspective they all share similar challenges in the following simplified process sequences:

1)    Deposition of 32-64 pairs of blanket “mold stack” thin-films,

2)    Word-line hole etch through all layers and selective fill of NAND cell materials, and

3)    Formation of “staircase” contacts to each cell layer.

Each of these unique process modules is needed to form the 3D arrays of NVM cells.

For the “mold stack” deposition of blanket alternating layers, it is vital for the blanket PECVD to be defect-free since any defects are mirrored and magnified in upper-layers. All layers must also be stress-free since the stress in each deposited layer accumulates as strain in the underlying silicon wafer, and with over 32 layers the additive strain can easily warp wafers so much that lithographic overlay mismatch induces significant yield loss. Controlled-stress backside thin-film depositions can also be used to balance the stress of front-side films.

Hole Etch

“The difficult etch of the hole, the materials are different so the challenges is different,” commented Singh about the different types of 3D-NAND now being manufactured by leading fabs. “During this conference, one of our customer presented that they do not see the hole diameters shrinking, so at this point it appears to us that shrinking hole diameters will not happen until after the stacking in z-dimension reaches some limit.”

Tri-Layer Resist (TLR) stacks for the hole patterning allow for the amorphous carbon hardmask material to be tuned for maximum etch resistance without having to compromise the resolution of the photo-active layer needed for patterning. Carbon mask is over 3 microns thick and carbon-etching is usually responsive to temperature, so Lam’s latest wafer-chuck for etching features >100 temperature control zones. “This is an example of where Lam is using it’s processes expertise to optimize both the hardmask etch as well as the actual hole etch,” explained Singh.

Staircase Etch

The Figure shows a simplified cross-sectional schematic of how the unique “staircase” wordline contacts are cost-effectively manufactured. The established process of record (POR) for forming the “stairs” uses a single mask exposure of thick KrF photoresist—at 248nm wavelength—to etch 8 sets of stairs controlled by a precise resist trim. The trimming step controls the location of the steps such that they align with the contact mask, and so must be tightly controlled to minimize any misalignment yield loss.

A) Simplified cross-sectional schematic of the staircase etch for 3D-NAND contacts using thick photoresist, B) which allows for controlled resist trimming to expose the next “stair” such that C) successive trimming creates 8-16 steps from a single initial photomask exposure. (Source: Ed Korczynski)

Lam is working on ways to tighten the trimming etch uniformity such that 16 sets of stairs can be repeatably etched from a single KrF mask exposure. Halving the relative rate of vertical etch to lateral etch of the KrF resist allows for the same resist thickness to be used for double the number of etches, saving lithography cost. “We see an amazing future ahead because we are just at the beginning of this technology,” commented Singh.

—E.K.

Memristor Variants and Models from Knowm

Friday, January 22nd, 2016

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

Knowm Inc. (www.knowm.org), a start-up pioneering next-generation advanced computing architectures and technology, recently announced the availability of two new variations of memristors targeting different neuromorphic applications. The company also announced raw device data available for purchase to help researchers develop and improve memristor models. These new Knowm offerings enable the next step in the R&D of radically new chips for pattern-recognition, machine-learning, and artificial intelligence (AI) in general.

There is general consensus between industry and academia and government that future improvements in computing are now severely limited by the amount of energy it takes to use Von Neumann architectures. Consequently, the US Whitehouse has issued a grand challenge with the Energy-Efficient Computing: from Devices to Architectures (E2CDA) program (http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16526/nsf16526.htm) actively soliciting proposals through March 28, 2016.

The Figure shows a schematic cross-section of Knowm’s memristor devices—with Tin (Sn) and Chromium (Cr) metal layers as the new options to tungsten (W)—along with the device I/V curves for each. “They differ in their activation threshold,” explained Knowm CEO and co-founder Alex Nugent in an exclusive interview with Solid State Technology. “As the activation thresholds become smaller you get reduced data retention, but higher cycle endurance. As that threshold increases you have to dissipate more energy per event, and the more energy you dissipate the faster it will burn-out.” Knowm’s two new memristors, as well as the company’s previously announced device, are now available as unpackaged raw dice with masks designed for research probe stations.

Figure: Schematic cross-section of Knowm’s memristor devices using Tin (Sn) or Chromium (Cr) or tungsten (W) metal layers, along with the device I/V curves for each. (Source: Knowm)

Knowm is working on the simultaneous co-optimization of the entire “stack” from memristors to circuit architectures to application-specific algorithms. “The potential of memristors is so huge that we are seeing exponential growth in the literature, a sort of gold rush as engineers race to design new circuits and re-envision old circuits,” commented Knowm CEO and co-founder Alex Nugent. “The problem is that in the race to publish, circuit designers are adopting models that do not adequately describe real devices.” Knowm’s raw data includes AC, DC, pulse response, and retention for different memristors.

Additional memristors are being developed by Knowm’s R&D lab partner Dr. Kris Campbell of  Boise State University (http://coen.boisestate.edu/kriscampbell/), using different metal layers to achieve different activation thresholds beyond the three shown to date. “She has discovered an algorithm for creating memristors along this dimension,” said Nugent. “From a physics perspective it makes sense that there would be devices with high cycle endurance but reduced data retention.”

“In the future what I image is a single chip with multiple memristors on it. Some will be volatile and very fast, while others will be slow,” continued Nugent. “Just like analog design today uses different capacitors, future neuromophic chips would likely use memristors optimized for different changes in adaptation threshhold. If you think about memristors as fundamental elements—as per Leon Chua (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leon_O._Chua)—then it makes sense that we’ll need different memristors.”

The applications spaces for these devices have intrinsically different requirements for speed and retention. For example, to exploit these devices for pattern recognition and/or anomaly detection (keeping track of confidence in making temporal predictions) it seems best to choose relatively high activation thresholds because the number of operations is unlikely to burn-out devices. Conversely, for circuits that constantly solve optimization problems the best memristors would require low burn-out and thus low activation thresholds. However, analog applications are generally problematic because the existing memristors leak current, such that stored values degrade over time.

Knowm is shipping devices today, mostly to university researchers, and has tested thousands of devices itself. The Knowm memristors can be fabricated at <500°C using industry-standard unit-process steps, allowing for eventual integration with silicon CMOS “back-end” metallization layers. While still in early R&D, this technology could provide much of the foundation for post-Moore’s-Law silicon ICs.

—E.K.

Managing Dis-Aggregated Data for SiP Yield Ramp

Monday, August 24th, 2015

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By Ed Korczynski, Sr. Technical Editor

In general, there is an accelerating trend toward System-in-Package (SiP) chip designs including Package-On-Package (POP) and 3D/2.5D-stacks where complex mechanical forces—primarily driven by the many Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) mismatches within and between chips and packages—influence the electrical properties of ICs. In this era, the industry needs to be able to model and control the mechanical and thermal properties of the combined chip-package, and so we need ways to feed data back and forth between designers, chip fabs, and Out-Sourced Assembly and Test (OSAT) companies. With accelerated yield ramps needed for High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) of consumer mobile products, to minimize risk of expensive Work In Progress (WIP) moving through the supply chain a lot of data needs to feed-forward and feedback.

Calvin Cheung, ASE Group Vice President of Business Development & Engineering, discussed these trends in the “Scaling the Walls of Sub-14nm Manufacturing” keynote panel discussion during the recent SEMICON West 2015. “In the old days it used to take 12-18 months to ramp yield, but the product lifetime for mobile chips today can be only 9 months,” reminded Cheung. “In the old days we used to talk about ramping a few thousand chips, while today working with Qualcomm they want to ramp millions of chips quickly. From an OSAT point of view, we pride ourselves on being a virtual arm of the manufacturers and designers,” said Cheung, “but as technology gets more complex and ‘knowledge-base-centric” we see less release of information from foundries. We used to have larger teams in foundries.” Dick James of ChipWorks details the complexity of the SiP used in the Apple Watch in his recent blog post at SemiMD, and documents the details behind the assumption that ASE is the OSAT.

With single-chip System-on-Chip (SoC) designs the ‘final test’ can be at the wafer-level, but with SiP based on chips from multiple vendors the ‘final test’ now must happen at the package-level, and this changes the Design For Test (DFT) work flows. DRAM in a 3D stack (Figure 1) will have an interconnect test and memory Built-In Self-Test (BIST) applied from BIST resident on the logic die connected to the memory stack using Through-Silicon Vias (TSV).

Fig.1: Schematic cross-sections of different 3D System-in-Package (SiP) design types. (Source: Mentor Graphics)

“The test of dice in a package can mostly be just re-used die-level tests based on hierarchical pattern re-targeting which is used in many very large designs today,” said Ron Press, technical marketing director of Silicon Test Solutions, Mentor Graphics, in discussion with SemiMD. “Additional interconnect tests between die would be added using boundary scans at die inputs and outputs, or an equivalent method. We put together 2.5D and 3D methodologies that are in some of the foundry reference flows. It still isn’t certain if specialized tests will be required to monitor for TSV partial failures.”

“Many fabless semiconductor companies today use solutions like scan test diagnosis to identify product-specific yield problems, and these solutions require a combination of test fail data and design data,” explained Geir Edie, Mentor Graphics’ product marketing manager of Silicon Test Solutions. “Getting data from one part of the fabless organization to another can often be more challenging than what one should expect. So, what’s often needed is a set of ‘best practices’ that covers the entire yield learning flow across organizations.”

“We do need a standard for structuring and transmitting test and operations meta-data in a timely fashion between companies in this relatively new dis-aggregated semiconductor world across Fabless, Foundry, OSAT, and OEM,” asserted John Carulli, GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ deputy director of Test Development & Diagnosis, in an exclusive discussion with SemiMD. “Presently the databases are still proprietary – either internal to the company or as part of third-party vendors’ applications.” Most of the test-related vendors and users are supporting development of the new Rich Interactive Test Database (RITdb) data format to replace the Standard Test Data Format (STDF) originally developed by Teradyne.

“The collaboration across the semiconductor ecosystem placed features in RITdb that understand the end-to-end data needs including security/provenance,” explained Carulli. Figure 2 shows that since RITdb is a structured data construct, any data from anywhere in the supply chain could be easily communicated, supported, and scaled regardless of OSAT or Fabless customer test program infrastructure. “If RITdb is truly adopted and some certification system can be placed around it to keep it from diverging, then it provides a standard core to transmit data with known meaning across our dis-aggregated semiconductor world. Another key part is the Test Cell Communication Standard Working Group; when integrated with RITdb, the improved automation and control path would greatly reduce manually communicated understanding of operational practices/issues across companies that impact yield and quality.”

Fig.2: Structure of the Rich Interactive Test Database (RITdb) industry standard, showing how data can move through the supply chain. (Source: Texas Instruments)

Phil Nigh, GLOBALFOUNDRIES Senior Technical Staff, explained to SemiMD that for heterogeneous integration of different chip types the industry has on-chip temperature measurement circuits which can monitor temperature at a given time, but not necessarily identify issues cause by thermal/mechanical stresses. “During production testing, we should detect mechanical/thermal stress ‘failures’ using product testing methods such as IO leakage, chip leakage, and other chip performance measurements such as FMAX,” reminded Nigh.

Model but verify

Metrology tool supplier Nanometrics has unique perspective on the data needs of 3D packages since the company has delivered dozens of tools for TSV metrology to the world. The company’s UniFire 7900 Wafer-Scale Packaging (WSP) Metrology System uses white-light interferometry to measure critical dimensions (CD), overlay, and film thicknesses of TSV, micro-bumps, Re-Distribution Layer (RDL) structures, as well as the co-planarity of Cu bumps/pillars. Robert Fiordalice, Nanometrics’ Vice President of UniFire business group, mentioned to SemiMD in an exclusive interview that new TSV structures certainly bring about new yield loss mechanisms, even if electrical tests show standard results such as ‘partial open.’ Fiordalice said that, “we’ve had a lot of pull to take our TSV metrology tool, and develop a TSV inspection tool to check every via on every wafer.” TSV inspection tools are now in beta-tests at customers.

As reported at 3Dincites, Mentor Graphics showed results at DAC2015 of the use of Calibre 3DSTACK by an OSAT to create a rule file for their Fan-Out Wafer-Level Package (FOWLP) process. This rule file can be used by any designer targeting this package technology at this assembly house, and checks the manufacturing constraints of the package RDL and the connectivity through the package from die-to-die and die-to-BGA. Based on package information including die order, x/y position, rotation and orientation, Calibre 3DSTACK performs checks on the interface geometries between chips connected using bumps, pillars, and TSVs. An assembly design kit provides a standardized process both chip design companies and assembly houses can use to ensure the manufacturability and performance of 3D SiP.

—E.K.