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Posts Tagged ‘ASML’

Blog review December 16, 2014

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

Maybe, just maybe, ASML Holding N.V. (ASML) has made the near-impossible a reality by creating a cost-effective Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV @ ~13.5nm wavelength) all-reflective lithographic tool. The company has announced that Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Ltd. (TSMC) has ordered two NXE:3350B EUV systems for delivery in 2015 with the intention to use those systems in production. In addition, two NXE:3300B systems already delivered to TSMC will be upgraded to NXE:3350B performance. While costs and throughputs are conspicuously not-mentioned, this is still an important step for the industry.

The good and the great of the electron device world will make their usual pilgrimage to San Francisco for the 2014 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting. Dick James of Chipworks writes that it’s the conference where companies strut their technology, and post some of the research that may make it into real product in the next few years.

The 4th Annual Global Interposer Technology Workshop at GaTech gathered 200 attendees from 11 countries to discuss the status of interposer technology. It has become the one meeting where you can find all the key interposer layers including those representing glass, laminate and silicon, blogs Phil Garrou.

Sharon C. Glotzer and Nicholas A. Kotov are both researchers at the University of Michigan who were just awarded a MRS Medal at the Materials Research Society (MRS) Fall Meeting in San Francisco for their work on “Integration of Computation and Experiment for Discovery and Design of Nanoparticle Self-Assembly.”

In order to keep pace with Moore’s Law, semiconductor market leaders have had to adopt increasingly challenging technology roadmaps, which are leading to new demands on electronic materials (EM) product quality for leading-edge chip manufacturing. Dr. Atul Athalye, Head of Technology, Linde Electronics, discusses the challenges.

ST further accelerates its FD-SOI ROs* by 2ps/stage, and reduces SRAM’s VMIN by an extra 70mV. IBM shows an apple-to-apple comparison of 10nm FinFETs on Bulk and SOI. AIST improves the energy efficiency of its FPGA by more than 10X and Nikon shows 2 wafers can be bonded with an overlay accuracy better than 250nm. Adele Hars reports.

Does your design’s interconnect have high enough wire width to withstand ESD? Frank Feng of Mentor Graphics writes in his blog that although applying DRC to check for ESD protection has been in use for a while, designers still struggle to perform this check, because a pure DRC approach can’t identify the direction of an electrical current flow, which means the check can’t directly differentiate the width or length of a wire polygon against a current flow.

At the recent IMAPS conference, Samsung electro-mechanics compared their Plated Mold Via Technology (PMV) to the well known Amkor Through Mold Via  (TMV) technology. The two process flows are compared. Phil Garrou reports.

Solid State Watch: September 12-18, 2014

Monday, September 22nd, 2014
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ASML on EUV: Available at 10nm

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

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By Jeff Dorsch, contributing editor

Extreme-ultraviolet lithography systems will be available to pattern critical layers of semiconductors at the 10-nanometer process node, and EUV will completely take over from 193nm immersion lithography equipment at 7nm, according to Martin van den Brink, president and chief technology officer of ASML Holding.

Giving the keynote presentation Tuesday at the SPIE Photomask Technology conference in Monterey, Calif., Martin offered a lengthy update on his company’s progress with EUV technology.

Sources for the next-generation lithography systems are now able to produce 77 watts of power, and ASML is shooting for 81W by the end of 2014, Martin said.

The power figure is significant since it indicates how many wafers the litho system can process, a key milestone in EUV’s progress toward becoming a volume manufacturing technology. With an 80W power source, ASML’s EUV systems could turn out 800 wafers a day, he noted.

The goal is to get to 1,000 wafers per day. ASML has lately taken to specifying throughput rates in daily production, not wafers per hour, since many wafer fabs are running nearly all the time at present.

ASML’s overarching goal is providing “affordable scaling,” Martin asserted, through what he called “holistic lithography.” This involves both immersion litho scanners and EUV machines, he said.

Martin offered a product roadmap over the next four years, concluding with manufacturing of semiconductors with 7nm features in 2018.

The ASML president acknowledged that the development of EUV has been halting over the years, while asserting that his company has made “major progress” with EUV. He said the EUV program represented “a grinding project, going on for 10 years.”

For all of EUV’s complications and travails, “nothing is impossible,” Martin told a packed auditorium at the Monterey Conference Center.

With many producers of photomasks in attendance at the conference, Martin promised, “We are not planning to make a significant change in mask infrastructure” for EUV. He added, “What you are investing today will be useful next year, and the year after that.”

Blog review August 18, 2014

Monday, August 18th, 2014

Vivek Bakshi provides a deeper look at the ASML/IBM announcement on EUV progress. ASML and IBM reconfirmed the benchmarking in press and via social media. In short, 637 wafers per day throughput stands, resulting from the successful upgrade of source power by 100%, to its targeted level of ~43 W.

Dick James of Chipworks finally has his hands on Samsung’s V-NAND vertical flash. The vertical flash was first released in an enterprise solid-state drive (SSD) last year, in 960 GB and 480 GB versions. Then in May this year they announced a second-generation V-NAND SSD, with a stack of 32 cell layers.

Phil Garrou provides an overview of controlling warpage in packaging as discussed at ECTC by Hitachi Chemical, Amkor, Qualcomm, and imec.

Anand Sundaram, Senior Associate for PwC’s PRTM Management Consulting writes that software that controls and powers embedded devices is playing a key role in making possible the highly integrated, multi-functional ‘smart’ devices we take for granted in our daily lives – from the ubiquitous smart phones/tablet to ‘smart’ home appliances and wearable electronics.

Pete Singer posted an IoT infographic, courtesy of Jabil. The global IoT market is poised for explosive growth. By 2020, the market is expected to soar to $7.1 trillion. This infographic, courtesy of Jabil, gives an good overview of what will be connected (even garbage bins!).

Bob Smith, Senior Vice President of Marketing and Business Development, Uniquify blogs that these days, chip design may seem like an intricately connected jigsaw puzzle, including small, oddly shaped interlocking pieces.

A New Era for Equipment Suppliers

Saturday, September 1st, 2012

By Pete Singer

The semiconductor equipment industry received quite a jolt recently. In July, lithography equipment supplier ASML announced a customer co-investment program that enabled minority equity investments in ASML (up to 25% total) by its largest customers. Customers could also make commitments to fund ASML’s research and development (R&D) spending for future programs.

Intel was the first investor, acquiring 15% equity ownership interest in ASML. R&D funding and equity investment agreements totaled approximately $4.1 billion. Part of the deal was a contractual commitment from Intel for advance purchase orders for 450 mm and EUV development and production tools from ASML. ASML has said the results of the technology investments will be available to every semiconductor manufacturer with no restrictions.

In August, TSMC joined in, taking a 5% stake in ASML, worth about $1.04 billion. TSMC also committed about $341 million, spread over 5 years, to ASML’s R&D programs.

The Intel announcement made instant believers out of many that both EUV and 450mm would actually happen. Both technologies have been significantly delayed beyond initial target dates, and the thinking was that some massive investment would be required to get them production-ready in a reasonable timeframe (i.e,. 2015-2020). $5+ billion is a pretty good start!

Not only does it seem to ensure that EUV will succeed, but it removed one of the most significant barriers to 450mm development. Even if 450mm solutions were developed for all the other types of process equipment — deposition, etch, ion implant, CMP, cleaning, etc. — it would be going nowhere without EUV. Now, seemingly overnight, 450mm seems inevitable.

It is a new era for semiconductor manufacturing equipment suppliers, for they must now seriously tackle the 450mm challenge, but don’t expect a blossoming new model based on customer co-investments anytime soon. There are at least two competitors in other markets, and developments will likely be funded the way they always have been — though good old-fashioned capitalism.