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IoT Will Enable ‘Living Services,’ Keynote Speaker Says

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By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

“It’s not about the sensors,” Nandini (Nan) Nayak, managing director of design strategy at Fjord, said Thursday morning (December 3) in a keynote address at the Designers of Things conference in San Jose, Calif.

Rather than talk about the Internet of Things, the subject of this two-day conference, Nayak addressed what she termed “Living Services” – the product of all those IoT sensors and processors, data centers, and cloud-based services.

Living services are “responsive to individual needs, contextually aware, and react in real-time,” she said. They “learn and evolve…as if they are alive.”

The “digitization of everything” creates “liquid expectations” among consumers and other users, Nayak asserted. “People’s expectations transcend expected boundaries,” she added.

The IoT involves “a shift of focus from designing for users and things to designing for people’s activities,” Nayak elaborated. “Everything is beginning to connect with each other.”

She added, “Sensors are cheap; they are able to be placed in many places.”

User interfaces are changing, Nayak noted, moving from computer screen-based interfaces to haptics and “touch-based interaction.”

She laid out the key characteristics of living services – the automation of low-maintenance decisions and actions, long-term learning from what people do, powered by data and analytics, collected from sensor-rich objects and interactions of daily life. “Think about environments, not industries,” Nayak advised.

“The IoT or living services will affect all aspects of our lives,” she asserted. “The home will be a key battleground.”

Personal health and shopping will be other areas where living services will have dramatic impacts, Nayak said.

How can businesses address living services? Nayak said the key points are: Know your customer; flex your technology; design in order to know and flex; and design to delight.

“Think about the value of the experience,” she asserted. “People expect the richness of experience, fun.”

Nayak concluded, “Prepare to atomize. Make your brand feel alive.”

Fjord was acquired in 2013 by Accenture, the global management consulting and technical services firm.

Nayak’s keynote was followed with a panel session moderated by Lucio Lanza of Lanza techVentures, a veteran technology investor and one-time executive at Daisy Systems, an early leader in electronic design automation that was acquired by Intergraph in 1990 and later absorbed into Mentor Graphics.

While the Internet connected computers and networks around the world, smartphones and other mobile devices are connecting people, Lanza noted.

Rather than the Internet of things or objects, it’s more correct to speak of “a world of things,” Lanza asserted, adding, “There are a lot of opportunities making this thing happen.”

Jack Hughes, the chairman and founder of TopCoder who also serves as chairman of the Christopher & Dana Reeves Foundation, showed part of a foundation video showing the benefits of epidural stimulation for people with paralysis.

“It’s not a cure,” he said of the technology. “These are early days. But it is extremely promising. Every one of these injuries is individual.” The foundation has supported the work of device designers, turning out the electrodes that can help paralyzed people move their limbs for the first time in years.

While the technology could deliver groundbreaking rehabilitation, “how do we make these things secure?” Hughes asked.

Mark Templeton of Scientific Ventures LLC, the co-founder of Artisan Components (acquired by ARM Holdings in 2004) and now a tech investor, talked about the Learning Thermostat from Nest Labs (now a Google subsidiary) and the business model behind the device, which can deliver data on its use to electrical utility companies to guide how and when they supply power to customers.

He urged IoT startups to “think about the business model more than the device itself.” He added, “The device is just the starting point.”

Ted Vucurevich of Enconcert, who once was the chief technology officer of Cadence Design Systems, said the IoT is bringing about a “transformation” in electronics, semiconductors, computing, and related industries. “It’s not about winning a socket,” he said, but “how you’re going to monetize the things you sell.”

He added, “There is consolidation and exploration. How can we allow these ecosystems to move forward? There’s a complete transformation coming.”

Noting his background in software, Hughes said, “When I hear ‘Internet of Things,’ I think ‘community.’ It’s a community of things. This is sort of a watershed moment.”

The panel, left to right: Ted Vucurevich, Mark Templeton, Jack Hughes, Lucio Lanza.



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