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Intel CEO looks to 3D tech at display conference

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By Jeff Dorsch, Contributing Editor

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich touted the capabilities of his company’s RealSense technology in a keynote address today at the Society for Information Display conference in San Jose, California.

In the five decades of Moore’s Law, named for the Intel co-founder, “computing has really had one trajectory,” Krzanich said – smaller, more personal, and more connected.

With the advent of wearable gadgets, implemented with Intel’s Curie module, “personal is at a new level,” he noted. “Displays are more personal and more connected.”

The devices of today, such as smartphones and tablet computers, “are dumb displays,” he asserted. “Everything you do is flat.”

While the advent of touch displays has freed users from computer mice and keyboards, the display remains “2D, flat,” Krzanich noted.

The next step is to make computers able to “see and hear like a human,” he said. “For humans, everything is 3D.”

He added, “That future is not too far off.”

Speech recognition has been in development for some time and has demonstrably advanced, Krzanich said. “When you can hear but not see, you’re only halfway there,” he added.

The Intel chief then held up a RealSense module, which is 3.75 millimeters in thickness. It can be embedded in the top bezel of a laptop computer, among other applications, he noted.

Intel is making its RealSense software development kit available at intel.com/realsense, and “all of these APIs are free,” Krzanich said.

The chip company has been working with such companies as Disney, Lego, and Food Network to develop RealSense applications, he added.

“RealSense cameras enable a new video experience, a much more immersive experience,” Krzanich said. “The computer starts to see the world as you and I do.”

Moving beyond consumer applications, Intel is now working on industrial and professional apps, according to Krzanich.

He demonstrated how a device with a RealSense camera could complete a three-dimensional scan of his body in about 30 seconds, and showed off a bust of himself made with a 3D printer.

This was followed by a demonstration of putting a virtual Brian Krzanich into a video game, where the figure ran and did handsprings and backflips. “If only I could do this in real life,” he joked.

Krzanich also demonstrated how RealSense can work with augmented reality, repeating a demo done at the International Consumer Electronics Show in January, where a virtual piano appeared in mid-air and could be played. With some help, he showed how a virtual secondary screen could materialize in mid-air and could employ AR for a variety of applications.

Krzanich appealed to the keynote attendees to take advantage of the free RealSense SDK.

“We want you to create something bigger and better,” he concluded. “We need help.”



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