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Directed Self Assembly Hot Topic at SPIE

By Jeff Dorsch, contributing editor

At this week’s SPIE Advanced Lithography Symposium in San Jose, Calif., the hottest three-letter acronym is less EUV and more DSA, as in directed self-assembly.

Extreme-ultraviolet lithography continues to command much attention, yet this conference is awash in papers about DSA, which dominates the “Alternative Lithographic Technologies” track of technical sessions. The two-day poster sessions feature 15 posters about DSA. Thursday’s conference sessions include three separate sessions devoted to “DSA Design for Manufacturability” and one for “DSA Modeling.”

With semiconductor industry anxiety rising at the prospect of quadruple-patterning and the slow yet steady progress of EUV technology, directed self-assembly is being hailed and recognized as a way to simplify chip manufacturing at the low end of the nanoscale era.

Before the conference got under way, imec reported on making significant progress in DSA technology, specifically reducing the defectivity associated with the process. Working with Tokyo Electron Ltd. (TEL) and Merck, which acquired AZ Electronic Materials last year, imec has come up with a DSA solution for a via patterning process that they say is compatible with the 7-nanometer process node. The partners are targeting the manufacture of DRAMs using 193nm immersion scanners.

“Over the past few years, we have realized a reduction of DSA defectivity by a factor 10 every six months,” imec’s An Steegen said in a statement. “Together, with Merck and Tokyo Electron, providing state-of-the-art DSA materials and processing equipment, we are looking ahead at two different promising DSA processes that will further improve defectivity values in the coming months. Our processes show the potential to achieve single-digit defectivity values in the near future without any technical roadblocks lying ahead.”

Kurt Ronse of imec describes DSA as utilizing two polymers to get molecules to array in lines or spaces. The issue has been to avoid the creation of holes that don’t fit the guided pattern, resulting in defects.

“All the big [chip] companies are having their internal developments on DSA,” Ronse said at SPIE. “All the memory companies are interested; Micron is in our program.”

While DSA is being implemented with 193 immersion equipment at the outset, there is the possibility of working with EUV scanners in the future, according to Ronse, and imec has an extensive EUV research and development program, he noted.

DSA started to emerge as a technology of note at the 2011 SPIE Advanced Lithography conference, Ronse said, which resulted in imec initiating its program in the field. There has been a significant amount of progress in the past two years, he added.

The momentum behind DSA R&D led to the establishment of the 1st International Symposium on DSA, scheduled for October 26-27, 2015, in Leuven, Belgium. Partnering with imec on the conference are CEA-Leti, EIDEC, and Sematech.

DSA – it’s one TLA you’ll hear a lot about in the years to come.



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One Response to “Directed Self Assembly Hot Topic at SPIE”

  1. Wallace Says:

    Listening to this guy is like following ASML’s source schedule- buy what he has to say and I have a bridge to sell you. Remember this clairvoyance (below)?

    Only 18 months ago Ronse was predicting that EUV lithography would be the way the semiconductor industry would pattern critical layers at the 22-nm node. He was also expecting the pre-production lithography tool to arrive early in 2010 or at least in the first half of the year (see EUV most likely litho for 22-nm node, says IMEC’s Ronse)(1).

    1)EUV litho keeps progressing, keeps slipping
    Peter Clarke
    6/9/2010 EETimes

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